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May 12, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

m

Fa5, asI e~s4

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saily endorse the sentiments expressed
'RIAL STAFF
phone 2414
,......BRrWSTFR P. CAMPBELL
. .............Joseph A. Bernstein
....................James B. Young

of the Festival, and not to broadcast any of the
concerts.
The action of the School of Music authorities
appears foolish, yet the same motives have appar-
ently prompted, them that prompted many artists
to refrain from making records for phonographs
when the talking machine first came into popular
use. At that time, countless musicians refused
flatly to have anything to do with the phonograph,
because of a feeling on their part that it might
cheapen their profession, and perhaps cut down
attendance at many concerts: they felt that people
would not pay high prices for concert seats when
they could listen to the same artists at home.
As a matter of fact, the talking machine did not
have the effect that was anticipated, and neither
will the radiophone. The use of the phonograph
has promoted interest in present day musical ar-
tists rather than retarded it; far from attracting
people away from concerts, it gives them instead a
desire. to hear and see the artist himself, or her-
self, once a reproduction ofi the artist's voice has
been enjoyed by a parlor company. The same thing-
undoubtedly will ultimately be true of the radio-
phone. It cannot reproduce the musician's person,
ality, which is, nor should be, a vital factor in the
success of any artist. It can merely reproduce his
voice, and hence, by the very limitations of its
scope, will attract people who benefit by it to the
orchestra hall to actually be in the presence of the
one whom they have heard over the radiophone.
Let the R. O. T. C. broadcast the May Festival, if
it is able to do so. The accomplishment will be a
bit of excellent advertising, and will reduce the at-
tendance in no way whatsoever: He who is suf-
ficiently interested in the Festival to come from a
distance \o hear it, would receive only a paltry
thrill at the.prospect of hearing it through a pair;
of telephone receivers, despite the fact that a slight
saving in car fare might be gained thereby. On the
other hand, to many who are not able to visit Anti
Arbor. for the concerts, the radiophone would offer
a worth while substitute.

GRA AM'S

AT

.. 4.

Mother's

G. P. Overton
M. B. Stahl
Paul Watzel
..........L. Armstrong

Keni

BOTH STORES

DETROIT UNITED LINES
An* Arbor and Jachrsoa
IXF TABLE
(Eastern Standard Tiwe)
Detroit Limited and Epress Cara 6:o
a. mn., 7:o0 a. Wa., 3:oo a. mn., g:oo a. W,. and
hourly to a5 p. iM.
Jackson Ere.. Car (local steops of Aan
Arbor), *:47 a. W and ever7 two hours t.
L eV a ac"ars Ret D. d---s:ss a.m., 7:oe a.
mn. 'and avr' two Ihotato t:.o p. rn., z11.06
P. ma. TO Y1psilauti only-tr :40 p. i.
. ,T *,"f*xg a.*. ie ,- n. :%
Totaline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars Weas Bouad.-7:5e a. n.., 40
To Jackson and Vi.aoo-Llinited cars:
4:47, 10:47, a. in., 42:47, 2.47, :47.
To jacksa sad Lansing - L.mited: 9:47
P. as.

COMING SOON?
jCK4. _q

I'm starting a riot
t at the
ARCADE
Wanna join us?

.....

*...Thornton W. Sargent, jr.
....George $. Sloi
........Sidney B. Coates
............George Reindel
..........Zlizabeth Vickery
......... R. Meins

It's Laughter Time Again - And
That You Never Will Forget-Regh
Upon Your Memory - Truly a Pi

1922
S

Marion Koch
J. E .Mack
Kathrine Montgomery
R. C. Moriarty
Lillian Scher
R. B. Tarn
Virginia Tryon

K

7
14
21
28

1
15
22

T
9,
18,
23
so

MAY
W T
34
10 1
17 18
24 20,

F
12
19
26

1922
6
18
13
20
27

+r+.. ... 3i.r. rr r.n .. rr

,jP

..........aV9RNON F. HILLERY
.Albert J. Parker
........John J. Hamel, Jr.
...............Nathan W. Robertson
..................Walter K. Scherer
....................Hero C. Hunt

I . D. Armantrout
$dward Conlin
Lawrence Favrot
C. D. Malloch
Wallace Flower
Charles R. Richards
Richard G. Burchell

/

AZING UNNECESSARY
which arise from mob hazing
ognized as well by the rational
lent body itself as by the faculty
Jniver'sity. In order to stop this
ining of freshmen which almost
cesses of brutality and often to
a plan was devised whereby the
hie rules for first-year men was
of a small and efficiently cen-
wn as the Underclass Conduct
ommittee was appointed by the
id as a result of its function,
:tically an unknown affair at
r, the Underclass Conduct coin-
defied by a first-year man, and
uliar circumstances surrounding
k of any official support by the
nmittee was unable to proceed
easures in regard to the matter.
licity was given the case, and it
certain unfortunate incident of
hazing of which the defiant
:im two days ago, that when'the
at its Underclass Conduct com-
ess to function in the manner
re, certain elements of the stu-
to the old "take the law in your
and proceeded to conductthe'
ght desirable.
[ways expressed itself' as abso-
hazing. But long and often
has taught that it cannot be
rely by an official dictum to the
of it will be tolerated. From
the freshman student, the f eel-
and upperclassmen towards him
am as it has in the past, and as
there will be. rules for first-year
to see that those rules are en-

NOW'S YOUR CHANCE
The time of year has come when the sophomore
and the freshman classes will have an opportunity,
to settle their differences by a means somewhat
more emphatic than mere verbiage. Argument may
be the more gentlemanly way, but it does not begin
to compare with actual physical contest for reliev-
ing pent-up feelings.
.Although the spirit of the spring games is
"fight", from the blast of the referee's whistle un-
til the final gin, there is no reason why clean and
fair sportsmanship should not-mark all of the con-
tests. In the rope-tying match, one has many op-
portunities to slug an opponent, or jamb a knee
into his neck. The tug-of-war has long been
known to offer subtle temptations to the wily-
minded. In all of the gantes there will be many,
openings for underhar<l tricks. Actions such as
these, though they may be mhost effective, are never-
theless not the most sportsmanlike, - nor are they
always the most judicious; the man on the bottom
may get mad.
'The spring games are one of the traditions on the
campus, and like other traditions, demand a whole-
hearted interest fron all who participate. Without
this, they become mere performances, uinteresting
to those who engage in them and to those who watch
them. A fight' in which there is no spirit is a tire-
some affair -- no fight.
The contests, although they are not slugging
matches, are nevertheless intended to be fights.
Plenty of "scrap" is necessary. Fall in, Sophs;
bring those Frosh down to earth! Firosh, show 'em
you can use your legs ; don't let the Sophs trample
you, under!
Sunday is Mother's day. How about a "special
delivery" tq reach her just as the family is sitting
iown to dinner?

HATS - SPRITNG- HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside aut, with all new trim-
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FAOTORY 'HAT STORE
817 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. io, rgr
Read Down Central Standard Time
A.M. P.M P.M. A&PM
Daily D~aly Daily Daily
7:30 r:3o Lv... Adrian ...Ar. 7.00 12:43
8:0S:5 e...Tecumsack .... 16:25 1:10x
8:25 2:25 ....Clinton......6:05 11:5.
9:15 3 --..-. Saline ... -.5:1 1:
4' 4gAr. Ann Arbor Lv, :51 1
A A&PDi
Read Up
SUNDAYS AD ITOLIDAYS
P.Y. PM.
3:30 Lv.- Adrian ..Ar. :oo
4:05 ...Tecumseh .. 2
4:25 Clinton . : 5
5:15 .. Saline ..7:15
5:45 Ar. Amn Arbor Lv. 6:45
P-M. P.-
Friday and Saturday
Hoot Gibson
IN
"Headin' West"

Men of Affairs
A new Dress Oxford
made with a wide toe.
Patent leather, the shoe for
wear with ,white flannels.
Dull calf with plain toe, if you
prefer.

1

$8.00

They're right

E@duottlonatComedy

WAGN ER
'For Men

%. .
Since 1.848

"No Parking"

rt

THE

ATTRACTIV

OF

HOME.

derclass Conduct committee has been a
means for enforcing these rules in a safe
manner, and thus removing the necessity
anized mob hazing. Its effectiveness in
practically all disorderly conduct from
.s has been sufficient proof of its, worth.
such as the one which has jus toccur-
te clearly that if mob hazing is to be
or good, some such student organization
derclass Conduct committee must be au-
vith definitely designated powers, of
I upheld by the University.

Ie Telescope
Por Your Beneit
We are trying
To satisfy
Your taste
For humor,
So send us
'Some suggestions
And samples
Of what
You like.
A Rotten Trick
She gets my goat, I'll not deny,
I speak of Sally Slater ; y,
Whenever she has company,
She makes me be the waiter.
Very Practical
A good way to test an aviator's equilibrium
would be to give him a round trip on an Ann Arbor'
street car.
Advice to- the Prof s
If a student tries to soft-soap you, always re-
member that soft-soap contains a large quantity of
lye.

IS GREATLY ENHANCED BY

WAL L

PA PIE

THAT HARMONIZES IN DESIGN AND COLOR WITH THE
DECORATIVE SCHEME, AND CONTENTS OF THE ROOM.
WE CARRY ALL THE NEWEST PAPERS IN BEAUTIFUL
TAPESTRY DESIGNS AND SOFT BLENDED COLORINGS.
WE BOUGHT PATTERNS TO PLEASE EVERY ONE, SO
YOU ARE SURE TO FIND WHAT YOU WANT HERE AND
AT THE PRICE YOU WISH TO PAY.
SPECIALS For Saturday and Mona
1 gal. $2.00 Special Interior Floor Oil. . . . $1.50
$1.00 bottle Furniture Polish for. . . . .75
3'Boxes Climax Cleaner ... .......... .30

5j°

OUGH PEOPLE FOR BOTH
of the signal corps unit of the Uni-
I. T. C. have intended to broadcast the
al concerts of next week, and have un-
een looking forward to this first worth
e to show the value of their equipment.

One to Think Oe r
If Spring comes, will the trees leave?
UNCLEBI

. H. WMajor
203 E. WASHINGTON ST.

NIE.

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