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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 14, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'AGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republicationof all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suscription by carrier or mail, $35o. y
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration.aNo man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.'
"What'sGoing On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ............................... E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R E. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials. .T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Supplement Editors...............T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Sporting Editor.............................George Reindel
Women's Editor............................. Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor .................................... E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry 'B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates ulian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arold Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising..... .................... F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication'Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts..............................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation~...............................Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Godring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1921
Night Editor-EDW. F. LAMBRECHT
VOTE RIGHT
Casting a ballot is the work of an instant. A few
scratches of a pen or pencil and it has been com-
pleted. But this is by no means all there is to giv-
ing a proper vote. Snap judgments, especially as
to candidates in an election, are seldom sufficient.
The officers to be elected today must be more
than the most popular men of the moment. The
proper discharge of the duties of these class repre-
sentatives requires, as is well known, ability and
hard work. To elect men able and willing to put
these requisite into the jobs is the problem of the
voter. This necessarily demands looking up, to
some extent, the past performance of the candi-
dates in public positions, and deliberation on their
relative merits.
Indifference taking the form of failure to vote at
all, is an evil that will probably be avoided this year,
but it should nevertheless be guarded against. By
failing to cast a ballot a voter makes the officers
elected just so much less representative, and if
enough voters commit the same neglect, peanut pol-
itics finds a fertile field.
Make it a point to vote today, and vote right.
HOW ABOUT IT, MICHIGAN?
One thousand five hundred Ohio State rooters
are planning to come to Ann Arbor by special train
to support their team at the Michigan-Ohio game a
week from Saturday. A total of five thousand
seven hundred and twenty seats have been reserved
by students, alumni, and supporters of the Ohio in-
stitution. Of course, the Oberlin disaster of last
week may dampen the enthusiasm of some of these,
but the Buckeyes are backing their team to the last

ditch. The number of seats they have reserved
verifies this statement.
The Michigan Union has announced that a spe-
cial train accommodating one hundred and twenty-
five persons will carry Michigan rooters to Urbana
and return for only $14.60 - almost one-half the
regular rate. Michigan students will go to Illinois
to support Michigan's team. But, will the Union
have difficulty in securing one hundred and twenty-
five supporters? Or with true Michigan spirit and
characteristic Wolverine loyalty, will our backers so
swamp the Union with applications that popular de-
mand will force those in charge to find room for
more? Cheer-leaders will be at Urbana; the band
is planning to go. How about rooters?
Ohio will probably have at least fifteen hundred
student backers at Ann Arbor. Are only one hun-
d-ed and twenty-five Michigan men going to Illi-
nois ?
A BIG TEN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
If plans to be discussed at a dinner of the alumni
of Western Conference colleges, Monday evening,
in Cleveland, prove popular to all, it is probable that
a permanent Western Conference Alumni associa-
tion will be formed in the near future, probably at
that self-same dinner.
It is to be hoped that the plan will go through as
expected. Not for nothing have the universities of
the Big Ten banded themselves together in a group
both for the promotion of athletic competition ard
general co-operation among them. For a good many
years these ten institutions have been acting as one
great unit in many respects, the activities of each

being devoted ultimately to the whole. With a few
exceptions, the spirit has been of the best, and the
organization has undoubtedly been of benefit to
every one of the schools represented.
Past happenings, most of them of a minor na-
ture, however, have indicated that a similar unifi-
cation of the alumni of all the universities in this
same group would not be a bad thing for the spirit
of each of the several alumni associations. An ex-
change of wordy buffets between alumni, notably
of Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan, carried on last
spring through the sporting columns of a Chicago
paper, and all growing out of a single outburst of an
over-heated Michigander, would seem to point to
the need for some sort of co-operation between the
alumni as well as between the schools themselves.
The Big Ten was organized to create a better
spirit of competition between the universities of the
Western Conference, .and not for the purpose of
promoting antagonism between individual gradu-
ates. Unity of the schools, ideal unity, is only.pos-
sible when the graduates of those schools endeavor
to maintain among themselves just such a spirit of
sensible rivalry as exists among the various student
bodies. If the proposed new Western Conference
association is able to effect and bring about such a
unification and such a spirit of mutual help and
consideration, it will have done much to multiply the
benefits of the Conference organization as a whole.
ABOLISH PANTOMIME
It should not be necessary in a school with our
traditions, our glories of the past and present, to
repeat every year the need of greater co-operation
on the part of the student body to the cheer leaders.
Eleven men fighting alone for eleven thousand
others who may sit passively on the sidelines can
seem a rather harsh picture to look upon, but the
fact is as true today as it ever was - that the team
alone cannot win the game: the men and women
behind the team must help decide the final score.
Get behind your cheer leaders, Wolvetines! The
big battles are just ahead of us. Change those puny
whisperings to man-size yells. Let the alumni go
back to their desks after the game with the voices
of husky thousands ringing in their ears. We do
not want our cheer leaders to go through pantomime
exercises. 'They are doing their level best for the
school and for the team. It is up to us to do like-
wise, by following these men "until the air is rent
as if by thunder". In the Saturdays to come Mich-
igan expect~ every man to do his duty!
T he Telescope

i,.--

A complete line of textbooks and supplies
for all colleges at both stores
GRAHAM
30th ends of the diagonal Ivalk

'1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
m., 7:05 a. m., 8:io a. m. and hourly to 9:xo
P. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), :48 a. m. and every two hours to
9:48 p. m.
Local Cars East Bound- :55 a.m., 7:0 a.
m, and every two hours: to 9 :oo p. in., z i :00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-11:40 p. in., 12.25
a. mn., 1:15 a.m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40 p.
m.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 1o:48 a. in., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48

PUBLIC

SALE

1921

OCTOBER

2
9
16
28
30

3
10
17
24
31

4
11
18
25

b
12
19
26

6
1s
20
27

7
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28

1921
1
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15
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OF
Choral Union Tickets
CONCERTS BY
HAROLD BAUER.....October 20
JOHN McCORMACK.November 22
IGNAZ FRIEDMAN..December 5
FRITZ KREISLER .....January 9
ERIKA MORINI.....February 3
ROSA RAISA, and
GIACOMO RIMINI .......March 14
Saturday 8 to 12 A. M.
AT HILL AUDITORIUM
THEREAFTER AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Good Seats Will Be Available at $4.50, $5.00, and $5.50

.

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
*nslde out, with all new trimmngs,'
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
e k*
I~cRLA ~- b

1'

I . ! I

Borrow It from Her
a young man

If you were.

ADVANCED
SECRETARIAL
TRAINING
FOR STENOGRAPHERS
MONDAY AND THURSDAY
EVENINGS
Class Commences
OCTOBER 24

Hot Malted
Hot Chocolate
Hot Bittersweet
Hot Butterscotch
WE WASH ALL GLASSES IN HOT WATER
709 N. UNIVERSITY

I

As I am
And met a sweet young thing
As I did
And were anxious to make a good impression
As I was
And took her to Freddie Besimer's for dinner
As I did
And then you reached into your pocket to pay the
bill
As I did
And found you forgot to shift your money from
your other pants
As I did
What would YOU do? -Ges Who.
WOW!
Headline in Ann Arbor Times News: SHOW
GIRL'S JEWELS ARE BASIS OF SUIT. We
wonder what else the suit was made of.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
He died of suffocation
Before his will was signed,
With every indication
Of too small a frame of mind.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Our Relatives Are Born to Us, but Thank God
We Can Pick Our Teeth."
Page the Nursery
Erm, Erma, and Erman,
Ermine, Herman, and Sherman,
All are getting there;
Can you make room in your family
For a lonely Teddy Bear?
Your one verse was good, Ermine, and Erm en-
joyed it. But you mailed it to the wrong address.
We are not the editor of Snappy Stories. Here is
the other one:
Lack of Foresight
If the freshmen form this year's Block M,
There's one thing that's not foreseen,
While the M's supposed to be maize and blue,
With the frosh it is sure to be green.
-Ermine.
Want to see something slick?
Sure Mike!
Look at a greased pig.
A New Version
Roses are red,
Violets are blue,
I like tea,
My sister has a horse.
- Dr. Kekkle.
Famous Closing Lines
"These are not breaches of etiquette," said the
flippant young thing as she strode across the cam-
pus in her 'bockers. ERM.

s: "
pytE f #R CN' EwI ALD
us'you

!'

hI

Note

November 10th of the Month
Records Now on Sale

,IoIe'

A-4468-IN A BOAT-Fox Trot...................................Happy Six
EMALINE-Fox Trot..........................Yerkes Jazarimba Orchestra
3453-SALLY WON'T YOU COME BACKI..............From Zlegfeld's Follies, 1921
SECOND-HAND ROSE....................Follies, 1921, Played by Ted Lewis
A-8459-I AIN'T NOBODY'S DARLING-(Song)-Fox Trot
Paul Blese Trio and Frank Crumit
FRANKIE AND JOHNNY-(Song)--Fox Trot'
Paul Blese Trio and Frank Crumit
A-8468-MOLLY D-Fox Trot...........................;Art Hickman's Orchestra
GOODBYE, PRETTY BUTTERFLIES-Fox Trot.... Art Hickman's Orchestra
A-8457-rM LOOKING FOR A BLUEBIRD (To Chase My Blues Away)
Marion Harris, Comedienne, Paul Blese's Orchestra, Ace.
SWEET COOKIE ................... ..........Marion Harris, Comedienne
A-3461-IN THE OLD TOWN HALL, from Ziegfeld Follies
Van and Schenk, Comedians
WHAT'S A GONNA BE NEXT, from Ziegfeld Follies
Van and Schenk, Comedians
Al2.mendinger Music Shop
122 E. Liberty Street

f

4

"When You Buy, Buy Quality"

Van

Heusen Collars

Place your quantity orders in advance
WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848

STATE

STREET

AT

LIBERTY

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