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October 14, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-14

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Of

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER '
TODAY

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A40
*Ktr t an

tilu

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 17. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1921 PRICE FIVE CENTS

CLASSES BALLOT
ON SUCCE[SSFUL
SENIOR, JUNIOR, AND SOPH LITS
CASTING VOTES IN UNI-
VERSITY HALL
ALL LAWS AND '25 LITS
ARE ONLY EXCEPTIONS

Booth for Engineers Located
Arch on Second
Floor

Over

Election for officers of all literary,
engineering, medic, architect and
homoeop classes with the exception
of the freshmen lits, who will nom-
inate their officers next Monday, will
take place today. All votes for offi-
cers for the senior, junior and sopho-
more lit classes will be cast in the
lower corridors of University hall
from 9-12 o'clock and from 1-3 o'clock.
Engineer elections will take place
from 9-2 o'clock in the second floor
corridor above the arch of the Engi-
neering building.
Senior lit nominations are as fol-
lows: For president, Walter B. Rea
and Preston H. Scott; for vice-pres-
ident, Martha Shepard and Josephine
Walter; fbr secretary, William Mich-
aels and Thomas C. Truss; for treas-
urer, Maurice Atkinson and George
Buchanan
Junior lit nominations are: Presi-
dent, Theodore Bank and Lawrence
Snell; for vice-president, Helen Part-
low and Esther Welty; for secretary,
Sadye, Harwick and Marian Wood-
mansee; and for treasurer, Thomas
Lally and Lee Mills.
The sophomore lits nominated Har-
ry Kipke and Stanley Muirhead for
president, Frieda Diekhoff and Elsie
Stevens for vice-president, Hortense
Miller and Marion Taylor for secre-
tary, and John Lawton and William
Weeks for treasurer.
Senior Engineer Nominations
Senior engineers nominated W. E.
Bandemer and G. W. McDoric for
president, E. H. Fox and W. E. Goetz
for vice-president, Eugene Harbeck
and E. S. Bradley for secretary, and
H. D. Tubbs and G. M. Chute for
treasurer.
Junior engineers: For president,
Paul Goebel and Thomas Lynch; for
vice-president, J. E. Johns and R. H.
Rowland; for secretary, E. C. Haug
and R. H. Hand; and for treasurer,
William Cotton, Jr., and W. F. Moore.
Sophomore engineers nominated J.
P. Bernard and C. A. Campbell for
president, C. A. Ross and J. W. Hos-
trup for vice-president; for secre-
tary, Henry Hubbard and C. R. Webb;
and for treasurer, F. S. Kratz and S.
H. Morgan.
Freshinen engineer nominations are
as follows: For president, W. H.
Webb and C. W. Merriam; for vice-
president, R. L. Underwood and R. S.
Scribner; for secretary, Muriel Ray;
and for treasurer,. J. R. Gilpin and
N. W. Hammett.
Senior medics nominated J. H.
Taylor, N. W. Bourne, Wilfred Mul-
doon and E. Elzinga for president; S.
J. Joyce, W. A. Smith and E. A. Wish-
ropp for vice-president; Isla DePree
for secretary; J. B. Stone and J. W.
Nagle for treasurer.
Junior Medic's Choices
Junior medics chose as their nom-
inees G. H. Belote and 0. H. Gillett
for president, Mary Saxe for vice-
president, R. F. Heatley for secre-
tary, and S. E. Doolittle and W. W.
Babcock for treasurer.
Sophomore medics nominated R. L.
,Mustard, J. M. Barnes, and W. C.
Wright for president, Louise Kappes
and Geraldine Hamilton for vice-
president, L. A. Brunsting, P. W. Du-
Bois and Thomas Outland for treas-
urer, and E. N. VanOrnum and C. J
Merkel for secretary._
(Continued on Page Ten)

Fetter Programs
For O.S.U. Game'
Programs for the Ohio State game,
will be of a more elaborate nature
than originally planned, according to
Bruce H. Bacon, '23, managing editor.
The change was made due to the fact
that the contest with the Buckeyes
had been designated as the Homecom-
ing game.
As first conceived, the athletic pro-
gram was to be similar to that is-
sued at the Illinois game last year, a1
16 page, rough paper issue without a
cover.' Because of the fact that the
notice of the change of the Homecom-
ing date was made late in the season
and the athletic program had been
laid out, extensive changes were im-!
possible.
However, it has been decided to
Improve the quality of the paper
which is to go into the program, in-'
crease it to 20 pages and put a&cover!
on the issue. The additional cost
will be defrayed by a charge of five
cents. The programs will be on sale
at the gates before the beginning of
the game.
DETROIT L U M iELECT
OFFICERS AT LUNCHEON
FOOTBALL SMOKERS, MEMBER-
SHIP DRIVES PLANNED FOR
THIS FALL
Detroit alumni held their first meet-
ing and luncheon of this fall at 12:30
&'clock yesterday at the Hotel Cadil-
lac, when officers for the coming year
were elected as follows: Mason P.
Runney, '08E, president; Roscoe B.
Huston, '04L, vice-president; Carl
Johnson, '20E, secretary; Charles Del-
bridge, '01L, treasurer.
Plans were made for a manifold
membership drive to start immediately
with special efforts to get the more
recent alumni to join. It was decided
to have smokers for all of the foot-
ball games played outside of Ann Ar-
bor. They will be conducted in much
the same way as were those of last
fall with special cars from Ann Arbor
on the days of the smoker, a direct
wire communication with the scene
of the game, a cheer leader on hand,
and eats and drinks.
From reports at the meeting many
Detroit alumni will be seen in the
stands at Ferry field tomorrow after-
noon to cheer the Varsity men against
M. A. C.
Meetings of. the Detroit alumni will
be held weekly from now on at 12:30
o'clock every Thursday in the Hotel
Cadillac. An invitation has been ex-
tended by the association to all stu-
dents to attend these meetings when
possible.

GIANTS' 1-0 WIN
GIVES PENNNT TO
NATIONA1.L1LEGUE
TWIRLING DUEL BETWEEN HOYT
AND NEHF FEATURES
FINAL GAME
RUN SCORED IN FIRST
INNING WITHOUT A HIT
"Babe" Ruth Vainly Enters Fray in
Ninth as Pinch Hitter
Despite Injury
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 13. - The Giants'
winning run in the first inning was
scored without the aid of a hit. Burns
went out, Baker to Pipp, Bancroft
walked. Frisch fouled out to Pipp.
Hoyt walked Young. Kelly sent what
looked like an easy grounder to Peck-
enpaugh but the latter let the ball
get through him and Bancroft, start-
ing from second as the ball was hit,
scored easily before it could be re-
trieved.
The New York National league
.baseball club tonight holds the
World's championship.
The Giants won the title by defeat-
ing the New York Americans in the
eighth game of the series at the Polo
grounds today. The American league
players died hard in a classic twirl-
ing duel between their pitching aces,
Hoyt and Art Nehf, the Giant star
left hander. However, they lacked
the necessary punch to win, the Na-
tional leaguers taking the game by
the score of 1 to 0 and the series,
5 games to 4.
McGraw's Second Pennant
The Giants' victory gives Manager
John J. McGraw his second World
championship team. The New York
Nationals seven times pennant win-
ners under McGraw's management
captured the World title against the
Athletics of the American league in
1905, and although winning the bunt-
ing five times since, they .have been
baffled every time until this year in
their quest for World honors, twice
bowing to the Athletics, once to, the
Red Sox and once to the White Sox.
This year after getting off with a poor
start, through loss of the first two
games, the Giants gamely came back,
evened up the series and with a
slight let-up while getting their sec-
ond wind, rounded into the stretch
with a rush and pushed through with
three straight victories to their final
triumph. In every victory, except to-
day's, they came from behind to win.
Pitching Wins for Giants
As for the underlying reason for
the success of the McGraw men, the
experts may differ, but there seems
little cause to doubt that the most
widely propounded opinon will lie
(Continued on Page Ten)

Alumnus Appears
In Weekly Form
"With the present issue, the Michi-
gan Alumnus enters into a new
period of its existence. Established in
1894 as one of the pioneers in alumni
ournalism - only two papers, those
at Yale and Harvard, preceded it In
the field - it has been serving the
alumni and the University over an
eventful period in the life of the in-
stitution and the history of American
education." Thus, Wilfred B. Shaw,
'04, editor of the Michigan Alumnus,
introduces the latest Alumnus on the
opening page.
The features of this first issue are
a digest of the new building pro-
gram, by the editor, a statement by
President Marion L. Burton, a resume
of the first two football games, an
article by Coach Fielding H. Yost,
and a short story of the life of the
late Prof. Henry C. Adams.
Until this fall the Alumnus has
been a monthly magazine sent out to
Michigan alumni all over the world,
but lately the alumni felt a need for
a more flexible and close touch with
the campus and its affairs.
EUSTCWEEK PRGRM
NERING COMPLETION
STUDENTS, CLUBS, UNIVERSITY
AND CITY ORGANIZATIONS
TO TAKE PART
Plans are practically completed for
Michigan's first Music week to be ob-
served in all the principal cities of
Michigan Oct. 16 to 22. It is aimed
to have Ann Arbor take a leading
place in this activity.
George Oscar Bowen of the School
of Music is in charge of Ann Arbor's
week. He reports the project is be-
ing supported with enthusiasm by all
city and University organizations
which have been asked to join in
making the work a success. The pur-
pose of this week is to bring music
to every man, woman and child in
the city.
Special Music Sunday
Sunday's program includes special
services of a musical nature in all the
churches. In the afternoon the first
concert of the Faculty series will be
given at 4:15 in Hill auditorium. Then
each eveninig of the week following,
except Thursday when Harold Bauer
will play in the Choral Union Concert
series, there will be a complimentary
community concert in Pattengill aud-
itorium. These programs will fea-
ture community singing and between
the popular numbers will be selections
by various local artists and musical
organizations, instrumental selections,
school numbers, music student num-
bers, choir selections and musical
numbers by guest organizations such
as the Y. W. C. A., Kiwanis club, Ro-
tary and Canopis clubs and the Boy
Scouts. There will also be four min-
ute speakers each evening.
Ann Arbor artists who will take
part are Frank L. Thomas, baritone;
Mr. and Mrs. William Wheeler, teno
and soprano; Nora Crane Hunt, con-
tralto; Nora B. Wetmore, soprano
and Nell Stockwell, piano. The fou
minute speakers are L. H. Butler, su-
perintendent of schools; C. A. Sink
secretary of the School of Music; Dr
A. A. Stanley, retired director of the
School of Music; Dr. Arthur W
Stalker, and Mayor George E. Lewis
Students Take Part

Students taking part in the pro.
grams will be Lucille Graham, plan-
ist; Louella Ensworth, soprano; Dor-
is Howe, contralto; Calvin Buzzo, vio.
lin, and Carol Pierson, soprano. Num-
bers will also be contributed by the
High School orchestra, the High
School Girls' Glee club and the Var-
sity Glee club.
In addition to programs in Patten-
gill auditorium and the concert by
Harold Bauer, will be an organ re-
cital by Earl V. Moore.

CASE ADDRESSES CONOPUS
CLUB ON DARWIN THEORY'
"The Antiquity of Man" was the
subject of an address by Prof. E. C.
Case, of the geology department, de-
livered before the members of the
Conopus club last night at the Union.
Professor Case expounded the Dar-
winian theory, and spoke in general
on the ancestry of the human race.
Cu~OMMITTEES FOR
Plans for Year Announced in Gen-
eral Way; Include Short
Trips in State
WALDER AND CROUSHORE ARE
MADE ASSISTANT MANAGERS

LEO NIEDZIELSKI, '23,
IS AUTHOR OF BOOK
Needs Larger Cast and Chorus Than
Any Other Show; Costumes
Already Ordered

"MAKE IT FOR TWO" IS CHOSEN BY
UNION COMMITTEE FOR PRODUCTION
AS MICHIGAN'S SIXTEENTH OPERA

SELECTION
WORKS

MADE FROM FIVE
SUBMITTED THIS
SUMMER

"Make It For Two," an opera in two
acts, was chosen yesterday by the Un-
ion book committee as the production
to be staged this year. Leo Niedziel-
ski, '24, of Bay City, is the author of
the book which will be put on as the
16th annual opera- under the direction
of E. Mortimer Shuter. The commit-
tee selected "Make It For Two" as the
best of five books which were submit-
ted. Two, however, were considered
so good that they will be presented at
the Union theater this winter.
One Act Abroad
The first act of "Make It For Two" is
laid in America, but in the second act
audiences will be transported to for-
eign soil. The book is brimming with
comedy situations, and there is enough
local atmosphere to make it a real col-
lege opera, and popular both in Ann
Arbor and on the road. The finale of
the show contains a surprise on even
a greater scale than the transforma-
tion scene in "Top o' th' Mornin'," last

Announcement of committee ap-
pointments for the Glee and Mando-
lin club for the coming year were
made yesterday by Gordon F. Godley,
'22E, manager of the combined clubs.
At the same time plans for the year
were announced in a geenral way.
Committee appointments were as
follows: Assistant managers, How-
ard C. Walder, '23M, and James'
Croushore, '23M; ticket committee,
Joseph H. Taylor, '22M, chairman, J.
M. Lightbody, '23, Walter Hanley,
'24M, and Arthur Robinson, '24; pub-
licity committee, Thomas Dewey, '23,
chairman, John Dawson, 124, Harry
Hoey, '24, Joshua Bacon, '24M, and
Ben Lee, '24; program committee,
James Stevens, '23, chairman,,Clif-
ford G. Currie, '23E, 0. B. MacGill-
cuddy, '25M, Roger Wakefield, '24M,
and Francis Scott, '25M.
The plans include arrangements for
short trips throughout the state for
concerts and plans for a Glee and
Mandolin concert this fall as soon as
the work of the clubs can be brought
up to standard.
LECTURE TICK ET,
SALES TOTAL 500;
Tickets for the Oratorical board se-
ries of lectures were placed on sale
yesterday noon and late in the after-
noon the total sale had reached more
than 500. The majority of tickets
sold were for the reserved section.
Included in this series of lectures
are many such prominent men as:
Sir Phillip Gibbs, English journalist
and statesman, Irvin S-Cobb, Charles
Rann Kennedy, playwrite, and possi-
bly Gen. John Pershing, or some oth-
er member of the coming armament
conference. It is expected that all
reserve seat sections for the series
will be sold by the end of the week.

year.
Several authors have been working
on music all summer, and most of it is
already in the hands of publishers.
A variety of writers will insure that
there will be no sameness in the mus-
ical numbe's.
Both cast and chorus will be larger
than last year. Twenty men will
have principal and minor parts in the
cast, while the chorus requires 60
men. Many new faces will be seen,
due to graduation by old favorities.
Scenery Building Starts
It is promised that costumes, danc-
ing and scenery will not be equalled
by any former production. Costumes,
every one of which will be especially
made to order for this year's show,
have been sent for. Scenery is to be
built by Carl Bromel of Detroit, Un-
ion scenic artist, who comes here to-
day to begin work. It is said that this
year's settings will surpass those of
"Top o' th' Mornin'" which were ad-
mittedly the best of any previous
opera.
Dancing practices have been under
way for three weeks in the Union
theater where 'the performers now
have the advantage of the theater at-
mosphere. Concentrated effort by ev-
eryone in cast and chorus is neces-
sary because it is realized that this
years effort is a large attempt.
To Take Long Trip
the show opens in Ann Arbor ox
Dec. 5 for a week's run. It will take
the road Dec. 16, playing first at
Grand Rapids. The itinerary which
includes two shows in Chicago and
Detroit, besides firts appearances in
Indianapolis, Cleveland, Dayton, Cin-
cinnatti, Lima and Toledo, and the
regular route to Michigan cities, is
by far the longest ever taken. The
show will be on the road 18 days, giv-
ing 16 performances in, 14 cities.
Men Wanted to Sell Megaphones
Thirty men are needed by the Ath-
letic association to sell individual
megaphones at the M. A. C. football
game tomorrow afternoon. Those in-
terested are asked to call at the ath-
letic office in the press .building this
afternoon to receive instructions.

Ethereal Jiusic Enraptures Large
Audience At Twilight Organ Recital

(By Thomas Dewey)-
More than 1,000 ' people responded,
to the second of the weekly twilight
concerts by Earl V. Moore, University
organist, yesterday afternoon in Hill
auditorium, and a program consist-
ing of three selections from "Messe
de Manage", by Dubois, and two by
Guilmant, gave them a restful hour
of the kind of music one- expects to
hear at a twilight concert.
The program opened with the viru-
lent "Entree du Cortege", the first of
the group from the Messe de M-iage,_
which carried the audience through
the intricate passages of the march,
to a thrilling fortissimo ending. "In-
vocation", the second selection, ether"-
eal in its beauty and so soft and spir-
it-like in places that one had to strain
to hear the distant notes, coming from

the very top of Hill auditorium, left a
deep religious haze behind it, which
was followed by the jubilant anthem,
Laus Deo, replete with its conflicting
harmonies and strong, hymn-like
character.
Guilmant's "Caprice in B flat", pre-
sented a strange contrast to the
deeply religious character of the
preceding piece being a quick, sen-
suous, typically French fantasy. Per-
haps the most impressive selection of
the afternoon was the last, "Funeral
March and Chant of the Seraphs",
which brought out the wonderful com-
mand of the organ by its greatest
master. Mr. Moore followed its chang-
es in spirit with a feeling remarkable
for -its interpretation of the slow,
stately and sad march of the funeral
cortege, followed by the joyous but
subdued chant of the heavenly choir.

SENATOR KNOX SUCCUMBS
TO STROKE OF PARALYSIS
Washington, Oct. 13. - Sen. Philan-
der Knox of Pennsylvania, former sec-
retary of state, died at his home here
Wednesday after a stroke of paraly-
sis. Senator Knox was on his way to
the dining room at 6:15 o'clock when
he suffered the stroke. He died .15
minutes later without regaining con-
sciousness.
Senator and Mrs. Knox returned
from England only day before yester-
day, where they had spent a vacation
during the recent recess of congress.
The trip seemed to have benefited the
senator and he had given no indica-;
tion of failing health.

r1

Public Sale of Season
Choral Union Concert Tickets

Saturday, October 15,.- 8 to 12
Hill Auditorium, $4.50, $5.00, $5.50

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