100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 05, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ring the uiyerslty
-licationa.

s u.
- a --._ .,o---.
133. asecoad

nard Street.

manuscript wil
menu. expressed

leaving a dance must ,pay an extra admission if he
wishes to return. In other words, those who attend
the Armory must remain cooped up in the smoke-
filled, inadequate lounge rooms all during the eve-
ring, while at the Union no dancer may even make
a trip to the Tap-room without paying an extra
dollar for the privilege. It is a question whether
the lure -of the back door at house, dances may not
prove too enticing to be resisted.
The question which arises in connection with
this whole business is that , of the interpretation
which will be placed by the city on the term "pub-
lic dance". Is a public dance one which is merely
paid for by those who participate, regardless of
whether or not attendance is limited to a certain
specified group ? Or does the term refer merely to
a dance held in a strictly public hall, and which
anyone may attend providing he can produce the.
required admission fee?
The Daily is entirely in sympathy with all at-
tempts to eliminate disorderly, vicious, or immoral
conduct at social functions anywhere, and it has
no fault to find with any ;efforts to regulate dancing.
in certain halls which have always been the object of;
much condemnation, and in which dancing never
has been properly regulated. But it does object
decidedly to having the city step in and dictate to
the campus.
The University has provided adequate rules gov-
erning all campus dances, has made it a point to
have every orfe well chaperoned, and is quite capa-
ble of continuing this practice unaided. It has
regulated the dancing hours, and has seen to it that
its regulations were enforced. It needs no assist-
ance from the city..,

ANew Line of

GRAH AM'S

.

BOTH STORES

i

AT'

TOR..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
......... ,...........Joseph A. Bernstein
............................ James B. Young
s : G. P. Overton
awaon M. B. Stahl
mbrecht Paul Watzel
ike
airman....................L. Armstrong Kern
dorner E. R. Meoss
ews
ditor................Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
G..... eorge E. Sloan
.Sidney B. Coates
.. .............George Reindel
........................ la....be. R. Meiss
Assistants
H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
Dorothy G. Geltz E. Mack
H. B .Grundy Kathrine Montgomnery'
Winona A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
Harry D. Hoey Lillian Scher
H. E~. Howlett R. T. Tarr
in Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
Victor Klein_
BUSINESS STAFF ,
Telephone 960
GER..............VERNON F. HILLERY
.........,,.......Albert J. Parker
...o......... .John j. Hamel, Jr.
............... ....Nathan W. Robertson
........................V'alter K. Scherer
................Herold C. Hunt'

DETROIT UNITED LINES
An. Arbor and Jacacas
TjME TABLE
(Easturn Standard Time)
Detroit Limitd and Fcpress Cam - 6:o
a. m., 7:6o a. ni., E:.o a. at., g:o. a. a. and
houtrlyto a5ssp. n+.
Jacsaon ExpresCars (local stops of Aan
Arbor),. .:4q a. and evr . two :ours t
Iw-.p. a.
Local Cam e at Beud-5 : S a a.,, y:o.a:.
'm. snd everytwo henrI Sto ,3:.o pa., t11.00
p. a. To Y4psilaalS onl-u : o . a.,n. :sg
s,. Aa., :: i5 s. in.
To Salle.echangi at Ypsdasti.
Locall Crs W sool ouad-7 :u. a. a., a:4c
To Jackon sad alamasoo-Iamfted carse
To Jacskoa and Lvsma - Lim ited: 37
ii. n

~RAE F
LAST TIMES TODAY I
"A CERTAIN RICH MAN"

GEORGE WALSH In
" Stanley in Africa "

{ 11
I The Fay

This "ad." with'>o cents will admit you ~agtimet
TUESDAY full instructio
your firstlesso
"The Four Horsemen" to play during
RA E DAVID PIANO
EZLVElTh vT.
lf,

3

1922.
,S

7.
14
21
28

1
15
22
29

T'
9
16
23
30

1 AY
3
10
17
24
31

T
4
11
18
25

F
5
12
19
26

1922
6
18
2Q
27

Keep Fit.

E. D, Armantrout
Edward Conlin
>e Lawrence Favrot
ich C. D. Malloch
wallace Flower
Charles R. Richards
rood Richard G. Burchell

FRIDAY. MAY 5, 1922
ht Editor-R. E. ADAMS,, JR.
stants-R. C. Moriarty
R. B. Tarr
T IS A "PUBLIC DANdE"? -
the city of Ann Arbor is seeking to
i right to jurisdiction over the acts of
.e University, if a newly-proposed or-
:gulate all public dances held within
s is to" be taken as a basis for judg-
rdinance has been designed seemingly
aany alleged defects", whatever that
e dance hall systems within the city.
. to cover fully "every known wrong
be existing in any local hall or acad-
it might, appear that the ordinance.
omly dances held in public halls down
lly, however, it- probably would apply
an Union membership dances, to all
vial functions, and even to fraternity
ory, 'and sorority parties. For the
fines a public dance as any dance the
which are paid, even in part, by- the
That covers practically everything.
tors of the ordinance even demand
dance - meaning practically no dance
he held within the city limits until a
:n procured from the city clerk, - and
is license shall be five dollars, the cer-'
issued only upon the approval of the
apparently means that if a f.rater-
club, or any other University group
I a dance at which admission is to be
her that admission be paid before, at
>r after the dance, five dollars. must
I over to the city treasury. In this
scheme ought to prove quite produc-
>r the city.
e goes on to state that no license will
1 the hall has first been inspected by
his repesentative. We shall have the
>lice continually looking over every
>r west of Main street; if this goes
ey will be required even to examine
ventilation, lighting and toilet. facil-
use. provides that no persons, or or-
of persons, shall hold a dance for
f raising money until a permit fee of,
;been paid to the city. Is the city a
arity? It is also declared illegal for
ider seventeen years of age even to
e unless accompanied by his or her'
l guardian. Which means that many
s, who are now being trusted far
me, are to be barred, while the rest
fly have to present birth certificates
rmission cards.
mes a stickler: Every "public dance",
expenses of which are paid even in
articipants, shall close before or at
midnight. The J-Hop will end at
I the Soph Prom, and all other stu-.

A GAME WITH THE BIG-LEAGUES
With the announcement yesterday that the Mich-
igan and Detroit American league baseball nines
may meet in Detroit, a proposition is presented that
is at once promising and attractive. It would be
a plan worth trying, as well because of its novelty
as because of the opportunity which it would give
the Varsity players of testing their mettle under
big-league fire. Michigan holds an enviable record
in the 'Western Conference and in general among
colleges throughout the country, but has never yet
ventured outside of this field. .
Such a game would also be a great drawing card
for the alumni, who would ,undoubtedly welcome
an opportunity of seeing the undergraduate repre-
sentatives in action on a big-league diamond. Stu-'
dents, to, would doubtless flock, to Detroit to wit-
ness the contest. Princeton, Yale, and similar east-
ern institutions make it a regular practice of book-
ing some National or American league team on their
schedules, and the games have always attracted.ca-
pacity crowds of students and alumni, as. well as
home team supporters.
If Michigan should win, it would be a proud
feather to wear in her cap. If she should lose, the
contest would still be a worthwhile experiment,
which might be made into an annual affair, such as
the Yale-Giants gartie. Arrangement of a suitable
date is about all that is required now to make the
Wolverine-Tiger fray a reality.
Locally, we have campus time, city time, and
railroad time, to which we may now add: Library
time, - a pleasant little variation inaugurated pre-
sumably to permit Library employes to quit work
ten minutes early each evening.
Are you practicing with that cane, senior?

HATS -- SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned Inside out, with all new trim.
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
ADRIAN-ANN ARB3R LUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. 1o, 19a
Read Down Central standard Time
AM. P.M. P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily Daily Daily;
.30 s:30 Lv... Adrian ...Ar. . 2:45
8:a5 2:05 .--. Tecumoe ... 6:2g a:zo
8 :2g' z:2 ....Clinton .... 6:05 r1r:5.
:z5 3:15......Saline .....5:15 r:oo
q .W Ar Ann Arbor Lv. A&PY
Read Up
SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS
1~u*

for both muscular and mental work by
one meal a day of
Two biscuits make a delicious and satin
you can eat all you wish without harm
cent. whole wheat, steamed and baked,
taste. Very rich in energy-building ca
' muscle-making proteins; liberal in vitami
food of brain workers and a leading ite
at athletic training quarters.
Shredded Wheat is. on the training
nearly every scho'ol and college in thi

making at

4:2 5
' 5
5 :45
P: M.

Lv.. Adriaun ..,.Ar,
.Tecumseb ...
. Saline ..
Ar. Ann Arbor Lv.'

r:o.
7:5
6:45
P.s
P.I

Shredded Wheat (

Visiting

Cards

100 cards from new plate
100 cards from your plate

10 per cent Discount on all orders received I
Avoid disappointment by ordering now

The Optimists
I never yet have met
A barber who could keep
Anybody's hair from falling out;
Nor, have I met a barber
Who did not think he could.
They all'have preparations
Guaranteed to make it stick
And after several applications
The customer has to'hold his hair
To keep jt in.
But I guess somebody has to believe
That the community isn't getting bald,
'And the barber might as well do it
Just as the preacher often has to believe
That his congregation isn't getting bad
Because if ie -doesn't
No one else will.
. Suggestions
HIow o get the crane out of the Clements library:
"DRIVE iT THROUGH THE BASEMENT."
Respectfully submitted,
An Instructor in, Mineralogy.

0

"

17 NICKEL'S ARCADE

SOME OF OUR
LATEST STYLES OF ENG RAVING
Mrs. Henry Ilunkn'on

iEwIxut~pxe(t ~Y*~JUxs44cs~i

MRlt s. OU; 1IUJE.S

a
2

9'9. 41Lt'' a " '0''11 ?
p

4~ii~zm ~wb*7

r i~nin

MR . tIIENRY NOR@AN,
s

Mr. George Quinlin
II

N''iss Florenxce Garrison.

6% amuo/FO ( nwr
~' K

These Wild Universities
The next thing we expect to see is a headline in
the "Podunk Gazette" or the "Oshkosh B'Gosh"
stating that "COLLEGE YOUTH$ KILL
TW1,LVE HORSES TO GET HORSESHOES
FOR QUOIT MATCHES".
Riddles
If for hours, like a horse
You'd worked'; your- grades were A or B,
And in a darned one hour course
A pesky prof gave you aD, -
Now what would you do in a case like 'that?

-.MORTON CLAiRE BENTLEY

MK. hOWJARD S. MOR0TON1
M

MR.CHARLES HARDING

N

-~ &1)?~~$ .~s~Q

I

P

'r

If C_

M~1~ t1~TTT ~tAYrrn4
5

MR.GRZANT 1S. TAYL®R

y

"

_ "Our heavy

Famous Closing Jines
hitter," said the baseba
"Orhev squd sheDzra1

squad as .the

ngral at '

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan