100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 03, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

the University
fal-

tled t. the ee ft
it or not othrwis
abliaked thifrein.

stree

rcrpt.will
expressed

sentiments

STAFF

TOR......,.....ER WSTER P. CAMPBELL
,...,...................,,.Joseph A. Bernstein
...James B. Young
m G. P. Overton
awon M. B. Stahl
ambrecht Paul Watzel
.Pike
hairman................L. Armstrong Kern
dorfer Et. R. Meis
rews
1Iditor.............--hornton W.Sargent, jr.
.................. ..George---.-Sloan
............................Sidney B Coates
................................George Reindel
............. .....lizabeth Vickery.
. . ... .. .. .. .. .... .. . R. Iteiaa

. Robert M. Loeb
),.i~. Mack
ard Kathrine Montgomery
R. C. Moriarty
R. B. Tarr
Virginia Tryon

--. . --

.VERNON P. HILLERY
.,,, ..............Albert J. Parker
. . . . . . . ..Jo h n J . H a m e l , J r .
, .. ....Nathian W. Robertson
,w.Valter K. Scherer
Herold C. Hunt
aistants
WVolfe E. D. Armantrout
*lum * dward Conlin
y Monroe Lawrence Favrot
m Graulich C. D. Malloch
Maltby Wallace Flower
y Reed. Charles R. Richards
Rockwood Richard G. Burchell
?Y, MAY 3, 1922
-PAUL WATZEL
E. Howlett

1 * £L li I*1ALA
Those of us who cone from the smaller towns and
villages wellremen ber the spirited games of quoits
that used to -occup the spre time f the older
pnembers of the co unitypr Bt wo would have
braved public opinion a year ago by suggesting that
the game be introduced into intramural athletics?
Although there is very little authentic information
on the subject, it is quite prcbable that the whole
affair came about in the following manner.
During the year previous to the current one, it
became a .growing custom, among those in higher
administrative positions of the University, to con-
gregate after the work of the day was finished, and
amuse themselves by pitching a game of horse-
shoes. The sport became popular and numerous
members of the faculty indulged in its relaxing ex'-
ercise. So popular, in fact,.did the pastime become,
and so great the eclat that was lent it by the illus-
trious persons who were its patrons, that the stu-
dent body gradually began to manifest interest also.
Clamor for the game became so loud that the in
tramural department was finally forced to include
it among the sports which it recognized.
Thus ,the ancient and honored game of quoits
gained its admittance into the aristocracy of college
sports. Strange things often happen. Maybe we
have inherited the tastes of our grandfathers. Who
can say but that when we have grown old, and have
returned to our native hamlets, we too shall hobble
out to the village green, and while away a Sunday
afternoon in a game of horse-shoes with our
cronies ?
SPENDING FATHER'S MONEY
Ever since the beginnihg of civilization,.evidence,
has been left to show something of the carefree dis-
regard of youths for parental labor and exertion.,
This has existed in one form or another throughout
the ages, until, in the college man of the twentieth
century, we find it mnanifested in what might be in-
nocently termed an orgy of wild spending. To the
tune of synthetic hootch, frost bites, golf suits, and
other incidental luxuries, the youth in college ex-
periences little difficulty in speedily getting rid of
money which may have cost Dad long hours of work
and worry to obtain.
At the other end of the line, Father lives in a
reverie of marvel and wonderment at the cultivated
ability of his son or daughter. Neither do the bi-
monthly statements he receives, artful and prolific
lies often, stretched out by thought and diplomacy
to masterpieces of grammar and diction, serve to
diminish his parental pride.
The Daily is opposed 'to censorship in all such
matters. Likewise, there re questions which con-
cern us more vitally than that of championing Fa-
ther's cause. But besides giving Dad an opportu-
nity to better his golf gne, a little less thoughtless
spending might have a tgndency to force some Ann
Arbor merchants, whose profits are swelled by in-
flated prices, to ask a little less for some of their
commodities.
Publication of SunDodger, the comic monthly
magazine at the University of Washington, has been
ordered discontinued by the dean of men, on the
ground that there is not enough comic material about
a college to enable a humorous magazine to sur-
vive. Very apparently the dean never went to
Michigan._
A Canadian student newspaper has just discov-
ered that Judge Ben Lindsey lectured here, and has
published a review of the speech, "Why Kids Lie",
which he delivered in Hill auditorium. This might
remind the old-timer of .the days when the ox cart
was used as a means of dommunication.
I'milce Telescop e
These Is Thesis Days
used to be happy and carefree and gay,
There were times when I e'en was so bold as
to play,
But now I travail in the "Libe" every day,
Why? - Because I am writing my Thesis.

I don't even go to the movie shows now,
But I sit atthat desk with a deep-furrowed
brow,
Gosh! - I surely get into a dreadful pow-wow
When I picked a course with a Thesis.

sE

GRAHAM'S

N

BOTH STO ES

IN lL Y

DETROIT UNITED LINES
An. AArbor end Jackiw
T IME .ABLE,
(Eastern Standard Tinic)
Detoit Limited and xpres Cir- 6:so
a. it>. 7:50 a. in., 8: .m~ . . :oea. 'm. and
hourly to :65 p..
jackson Expre.. Cars (local stos of Ann
mArbor), ; : ' a. - and every' two heours te°
Local Cara 4ast Bouud-S:gs am., 7:;o a.
m,. and every two burs to 9 ;oo p. an. A!.otl
-. . 'ToaYpsolainti ondly-ri : .d iii.. ra:aR
T;. Ca, Chang at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bo ud-7 :10 a. fn., :4
To Jackson and -alariazoo-limited ears:
ro Jacks". and Lanasig- I 7~ted: 1:41

ENGRAVING
100 CARDS- FROM YOUR
PLATE - $1.75
100 CARDS WITH YEW
PLATE - $3.00 UP
0. D. MORRILL
17 NICKELS ARCADE
Stationery & Typewriters

- -

RAE
Last Times Today
Lois Weber's
"TOO WISE WIVES"
also 1
Christy Comedy
At Pre.War Prioes
Tuesday . Wednesday
"The Four Horsemen"
RAE

t

A New Line of Place Car

n

.

r;,,.

REE BUTr
two things

BODY BOUND
in its train :the fever
aminations. Strangely
losely related.
usually necessitates dis-
ubus, exams.. To rid
ms to have recourse to
own, letting the thing
sto be no escape from
he who forgets studies
ch trouble for himself

*1

1922 MAY 1922
Sfl T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 .6
7 r8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 { 29 30 31
rHATS - SPRING - HATS
Jieblosked at greatiy redaced prices.
'Turned inside obut, .with all new. trim-
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792'
OTHIERSSAY:
THE FRESHMAN CAP
(Detroit News),
"I am attending this college to gain
an education, not to follow your tra-
ditions," a freshman is said to have
replied when summoned before a stu-
dent committee to explain why he re-
fused to wear the regulation freshman
cap which University tradition forces
uponthe head of every member of the
first-year class.
Now it may be difficult for thinking
men and women to understand just
why this, reverence for tradition runs
so high on the college campus; for it
does run high-higher at times with
some of these young people than does
the desire for an education. We have
been told by college presidents and
commencement orators that education
means freedom, that the trained mind
ihas more initiative, is less shackled
by customary and traditional ways of
thinking, that it is only natural for
us to look at education as the process,
by which we are taught to think for
ourselves.
And still to the college student a
university without its student tradi-
tions is like a pork roast without apple
sauce, Qr turkey without cranberry.
Of course none of this is very serious,
Such a practice as fitting out all fresh-
men with regulation caps has in the
opinion of the majority a good deal to
recommend it. It makes a 'distinction
which on the campus is a necessary
and vital distinction.
It inflicts injury on no one. And to
the great majority of students, fresh-
men and upperclassmen alike, it is
highly agreeable to make these dis-
tinctions in years of residence on the
campus: The freshmanl toque helps
freshmen to recognize each other, just
as the students of the various upper-
classes and different departments are
set off from each other by these and
similar insignia. It is all a part of
the life and atmosphere of the college
community..'
'The° point at issue is' scarcely a legal
one. It is merely a matter of good
judgment and expediency as to just

PHONE 2030

O.CECrA
I C E"REAM

PHONE 2830

AT

Every flayor meets lioth favor
First Class Fod
and at
RE ASONABLE PRICES
Oh, you will like the good old-fashioned
meals you get at

Be SURE it's a
FROSTBITE
IF IT ISN'T A
FROSTBITE
IT ISN'T FILLED WITH

p

512 E. William Street

........:.:..,.Y

m

disinclined to work, - though
and the river call, - he must
educing allurements, close his
he outdoors, and dig in. The
is at once harmless and - in--
ing oneself on fancy, picturing
ner, yet not indulging in them.
tism, it seems. 3
y on. Only a few more weeks,.
ill end in the fields where stud-

_ti f
r
wr
r
+r
'w
w
wr
w ',.
,
"w
.w ;
r
ww
w
w
s
'
err
r -
w ,
w
aw
w
.w
rr
Yr
r
s
r
. .
r
w
i
w
.r
r
i
1
At
A °
r
A
1!A{
10
A
i/
w
. rr
.
s
w

i illililiiliillililii11i11tMlltlllllill lillilil
...,..
<<
''
, t
. . :
,I 1
}
,,
(4'
a
.
.. } -

Do You :
that We
New Fur

out of old -that we s
ize in upholstery and
ishing - and finally tha
SAVE YOU MO
We also will Pack and
Your Furniture for Y

Z BETTER SUMMER UNITY
students of the University, not also en-
regular sessions, are denied some part
rience of- "going to college" merely be-
ch thing as intercollegiate athletics ex-
the Summer session. Competitive
ge. factor in making for unified college
atirely lacking during the short sumier
student is engaged in his own individ-
e has little contact with other students,
lly no, common interest'with them. What
tion there is occurs within small, lim-
else may be said about the value of
te athletics, it must be admitted that
provides a check upon the tendency to-
ive individualism. Loyalty to the teams
the University is an important tie,
ind together, by a common interest, the
rse groups of persons which make up
body. For this reason, such loyalty is
deed almost demanded.
competitive sports idea to the Summer
much will have been done toward solving
of how to attain unity among the stu-
ege spirit, so called, will survive
the summer instead of suffering a lapse
warm session. A schedule of competi-
contests of some kind, between the two
n ference universities maintaining large
ools, should carry over a healthy rivalry
institutions, a spirit of rivalry and mu-.
which should be as beneficial for sum-
s as for those of the regular term.
SE-SHOES ON THE GREEN
advent of quoits, or as the game is bet-

Prompt Service
Satisfactory Results

k w .

w
a
w
r
_
it

,. ,
w
a
0
w
i
ur
s
r_

Ann Arbor Furniture Co.
Phones 2049 -'2059 209 N. Fourth Ave.

Mayhap if I find enough way I can rave,
* I'll finish that paper o'er which I now slave,
And then I want people to put on my grave,
"He's finished - and so is his Thesis".
{_ - U. Noe.
Easy 'Answers
Dear Erm:
I haven't got thirty-five cents Ito go to the show,
and so I want to know if the "Green Temptation"
is .a necktie or a bottle of Creme de Menthe?
Yours, Ichabod.
Dear Ich: Your second suggestion sounds more
plausible, but we're inclined to believe that the title
"Green Temptation" refers to a frosh co-ed.
Our O zn-News Bureau
A shortage of horseshaes has decidedly ham-
pered the progress of the new intramural sport of
quoits. In order to obviate this, it has been sug-
gested that students should visit farms at night, and
wait for the horses to take off their shoes in going
to bed, then steal them and run quickly back to the
campus. All men from metropolitan cities approve
this plan as a wise one.

what it brings the individual if he
thus insists on being different from
his fellow-students. Quite aside from
the idle consideration as to whether
he can be made to wear this cap by
student or faculty ruling at the risk
of being sent home if he fails to con-
form, the young man would no doubt
find it more expedient if ne conformed
to the will of the majority. It is
better to do in Rome as the Romans
do, whether in college or out of it.
COLLEGE REPUTATIONS
(McGill Daily)
The deeds of our lives are as grass;.
the wind passes over them -and they.
are gone, Such is the destiny of the
acts of most of us-f-ading memory,
occasional recollection, and then ob-
livion. Not even the evil that men do
lives after them; for long.
Bat it is ludicrous to ask that what
a man does during his college career
should make him immortal or even
cause his memory to be revered for
long. He works for temporary reputa-
tion, for the value of meeting his fel-
lows, for the experience which comes
from doing the work of the campus,
for the good of a campus which must
have that work done.

i
r uri nnr i i EU n it . i

COMING! COMING!! COMING
ATTRACTION EXTRAORDINARY

jI!

JESSE L LASKV-9R fENti
. t t nSf
/ *$pIL31L" i
.. tp ON!LD

, RoDoo"' v

Famous Closing Lines
ejaculated the young man, as the in-

=r

Rena

Michigan Daily Ads and

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan