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May 03, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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IASSOCIATI
PRESS
fDAY AND NIGHT
I SIR VICE

)

153

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN'WEDNESDAY, MAY 3, 1922

PRIG FIV I

.......,.,.,..,..,,.wY

PRICE FIVE C

- _ _.. . .

r.ER

LEADS

IN

COUNCIL

RAC

r.

USSES
MAND
'ROBLEMI

[)ED TO

.Legaxl Steprs Will'
lie Ta ken A t Union
"Crease N dance? wWhy Crease
dance?" Nobody knows. 'The. namte
of the dance is merely a tradition, in-
herited from years past, which has
long since lost its meaning. The only
data on the subject is that it is the
annual party of the law students of
the University, and that thi' yerr it
will take place at 9 o'clock Friday
night at the Union.
Chief among the minor attractions
of the evening will be the appearance
of the Crease paper, whicl offers two
law gems, one purporting to relate the
origin of the Crease dance, .and the
other burlesquing the class in corpo-
rations in a feature entitled "Corpora-
tions, Its Resurrection."
Chaperons will be Dean Henry M.
Bates and Mrs. Bates andthe members
of the law faculty and their .wives.

State Rivals Cross Bats at
Lansing; Entire Squad to
Take Trip

East

'WOLYERlINES CLASH
MTHASGIES TODAY

7RE CONCLUDES
TORICAL COURSE
Not Popular Biut Powerful,
Declares Student of
Situation

TEAM TO TRAVEL VIA AUTOS
. INTO OPPONENTS' TERRITORY
Michigan's entire Varsity baseball
squad of 23 players accompanied by
Coach Fisher and Manager Wilson
will leave this morning for Fast Lan-
sing, where the Wolverine nixre meets
the M. A. C. team this afternoon on
the Aggie field in the first diamond
encounter between the two state riv-
als this season. Fisher's party of ath-
letes will leave at 10 o'clock from the
Ferry field club house, from where
they will drive to Lansing in automo-
biles.

F rolic T 'icket s
Sold T omorrow
Tickets for the Freshman Frolic,
which will be held May 12 in the
ballroom of the Union, will be on sale
tomorrow from 10 to 12 o'clock and
from 3 to 5 o'clock in the lobby of
the Union. They will continde on sale
.or several days at the same hours.
One hundred and seventy applications
have been received to date and as 200
tickets will be sold, there are still
chances for 30 freshmen to obtain
tickets..
Class dues must be paid before tick-
ets are purchased and for this reason
the dues may be paid at the same.
time the tickets are purchased. The.
tickets sell far' $5:00.
.S
P Y H

EARLY MORNING RESULTS, FAR FROM COMPLETE,
CLOSE RACES; OFFICIRALS
CONTINUE COUNT

SHOW MA

UNDERWOOD, LYNCI IN CLOSE CONTEST
FOR UNION PRESIDENT1 3000 BALLOTS
POLLED IN ALL-CAMPUS ELECTID

NEW

PLAN ADOPTED BY
SUCCESSFUI ; FAIR

COUNCiL PROVES
ELECTIONS ASSUIR

Frances Ames, '23, Elected to Presidency of Women's League by
Majority; W. A. Cotton, '23E, heads Engineering Society
E. H. Lunden, '23A, Leads Architects

easier to find Bolshevism in
'k than in Russia," is the
t of Sir Paul Dukes, who has
years in Russia studying the
.s of thb country, in his ad-
Hill auditorium last night
e auspices of the Oratorical
on. Sir Paul, who was re-
nighted by the British gov-1
in recognition of his service,
majority of his time in Rus-
ised as an ordinary peasant.
Creed Not Sectional
evism is not essentially a
of Russia or any community;
ssentially a international
t," he said, "and Russia was
starting place for it. Those-
inated it intended that it
e spread all over the world.
e Bolshevists in Russia now
ii are for the most part not

Cenftral Leader Attempts to Break.
Line by All-Night Cannon-
ade
-.
TWO THOUSAND FATALITIES
OCCUR IN PEKIN REGION
(By Associated Press)
Pekin, May 2.--Heavy cannonading
was in progress today at various'
points along the front extending from
Machang, south of Tientsin, across the
country to= the vicinity of Pekin.
Heavy fighting occurred along the
Hun Ho river 30 miles south of this:
city where 40,000 troops of General.
Wu Pei Fu, the central Chinese lead-
er, endeavoring to force a crossing in
order to gain control of the Pekin-
Tientsin railroad.
More Troops on Way
General Chang Tso-Lin, governor of
Manchuria and dead of the opposing.
forces, from his headquarters in Ti-
entsin,. ordered trains to convey the'
main body of his 1,000,000 soldiers
to the front south of the Great Wall.
Advices received] (by military at-'
taches here said Wu Pei Fu was send-

evism is a creed originated by
rxs, and this is probably why
of the creed's adherents are
hese adherents, though, ,are
11 of them, among the few
in cbntrol of the government;
e very few among the com-
ple."
aking of the foremost leaders
ussian people, Sir Paul said
ine was far less unpopular
more powerful than the oth-
that Trotzky enjoyed only a
lower because of his control
my. The reason for Lenine's
y is that he is now granting'
ncessions to capitalists and
sople in general, and is re-
his old ideas on bolshe-
said. He is granting more

Expert Opposition
Today's trip is the first one of the
season on which all of the Varsity
players have been included. Coach
Fisher is not expecting his team to
encounter great difficulty in winning
from the Farmers, although he is not
allowing his men to take the Aggie
contest too lightly. On paper the 'Wol-
verines have a tremendous advantage
for the Green and White nine has
been none too successful this spring
and only recently took the small end
of a 12 to 6 count against Notre Dame.
In the past, however, the Farmers
have jut up their best games against
Michigan, and this year ,should prove
to be no exception. Dick Shultzrand
Blott will be the battery men for
Michigan. Shultz earned the name of
the iron man of the Wolverine mound
corps on the southern trip when he
twirled in more contests than any
other of Fisher's hurlers. Dick shows
a vast improvement over last year and
has an effective delivery, which should
fool the Green and White batters.
Blott ,to Work
Jack Blott will work behind the
bat. Blott has the ear marks of a
star catcher and Fisher is grooming
him for the position next year when
Michigan will be without the servic-
es of Ernie Vick, who completes his
period of competition for the Wolver-
ines this June.,fSlott has been a
heavy batter man in the practice
game, but has had little opportunity
to demonstrate his ability with the
stick in regularhgames as Captain
Vick has been used in every contest
except the Ypsilanti fray.
M. A. C. should give the Wolverine.
team good preparation for the coming,
games this week end with Notre Dame
and Iowa. Last week against Chica-
go and Wisconsin the Michigan bat-
ters hammered the offerings of the
opposing pitchers all over 'the dia-
mond. If Fisher's men hit as well,
against the Farmiers as they did last;
week they should win by a large
score. Uteritz, Wimbles and Knode,'
all in the heavy end off the ,batting or-,
der, were the stick men who played
havoc with the pitchers Chicago and
Wisconsin sent against Michigan.
These men together with Shackle-
ford, Kipke and Vick are the batters
who are counted on by the Wolverine
mentor to keep Michigan out in front
of the flag race.
PN T
PAYS I-

Tendency Towards Increasing of
Production Seen Despite
Condition

Coal

HOOVER STUDIES MINING
CONDITI NS OF INDUSTRY
,(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 2. - Indications
were given today that the administra-
tion policy toward the bituminous
coal strike would remain unchanged
for the present, although President
"Hardings' advisers and officials have
given attention recently looking to in-
tervention of the industry by the gov-
ernment.
Production Increases
A slight tendency for coal production
'to incease notwithstanding the strike,
fairly peaceful conditions _in mining
sections as evidenced from confiden-
tial reports from almost every locality
from government agents, and undis-
turbed price levels, it was declared,
might allow operators and miners to
work adjustments eventually without
federal action,
Secretary Hoover has had under
way a study of the industry particu-
larly with reference to mining condi-
tions which occasioned in it part time
operations and intermittent strikes. It
was not indicated: today, however,
that those studies had direct relation
to the wage controversy which caused
the national strike, but it was con-
sidered they might have some indi-
rest bearing..
Federal Action Seen
Secretary Davis was also under-
stood to have gathered data on a va-
riety of plans submitted looking to
federal action. Some of them in-
volve creation of federal regulatory
commissions and are in line with
house labor committee proposals
which have been put before President
Harding.
J imes* Attempts
Hy .stery Drama I
f H igh Cal riber1

exception of the complete literary
college vote and Law and Medical
schools ballot, show that the total
'ote cast will probably exceed 3,000.
At 12:30 o'clock this morning the re-
sults given above in the two major
issues were gleaned from the ballots
counted. Councilmen continued 'their;
counting, declaring that they would
not leave the .room until the complete
returns were in.
Voting was strictly according to the
registration lists and only a few at-
tempts 'were made by non-registered
students to cast ballots. These votes'
were rejected so that only those
whose names appeared on the lists
have haid'their votes counted. The
ballot boxes were delivered to the
Student council under lock and
brought to the Union for counting the
votes.
All members of the council with
the exceptional of those who were ,
candidates for campus offices were.
present. Counting of votes began at.
6 o'clock and still continued at' an.
early hour this morning. Each ballot
wasy gone over and the votes transfer-
red to individual sheets.l or this rea-
son the final result in all offices was

iie Conditions Bad
omic conditions, he stat-
ey had depreciated one
million timnes in value
ginning of the late war,
ant of the industries were
1, and that the two great-
s were the manufacture
es and paper money. ,
is to developdas a na-
d, "vitality ,and political
be restored to her peo-
[glt which .the officials
hoot a man for criticism
od."
e concludes the series of
s given under the an-
University Oratorical as-
the present year. The
next year have not been
ILTY SECURES
ES OF GOODRICH
LN AT IOWA NAMED
SSOR HERE FOR
EXT YEAR
r M. Bates, of the Law
need the appointment of,
t F. Goodrich, acting
>wa Law school, as pro-
T in the University yes-
oon.
roodrich, who has been
as "a man of affairs, a
ve student of law, a pro-
fer, and an effective and
er," will take up his new
fall. He received, his
ning at Carleton college,
w degree, L.L.B. cum
arvard in 1914. After a
a active practice in Min-
ich . accepted an instruc-
Iowa Law school. He
'essor in 1919 and acting,

Election returns coming thick and fast at an early hour this morning
indicated that Vernon F. Hillery, '23, is the campus choice for the presi-
dency of the Student council. Late reports of similar nature practically
tied the situation between Thomas J. .Lynch, '23E, and Thomas I. Under-
wood, '23L, for the presidency of the Union. These returns cover a little
more than half the total vote and were given Thd aDily at 12:30 o'clock
this morning.
Returns from practically every department of the University with the

ing" troops northward at the greatest
possible speed.
Foreigners Watdi
Two thousand dead and wounded
were found on the field after the bat-
tle of Changsinpi n, outside of Pekin.
The booming of cannon was heard in
Pekin all last night but the cannon-
ading ceased' this morning. Despite
the continuation of trench warfare,
many foreigners including legation
guards, went outside the city to view
the hostilities.
. .. - . ..
y:
ftl'usic Stu rdent s
To Give Tw.ilight
Rftecitatl Tomovrrowv

delayed until the entire
ballots had been counted.

number of

Advanced students of the School of
Music will give the next Thursday
Twilight program at 4:15 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon in Hill auditorium.
Every year those students in the dif-
ferent departments of the school who
have shown exceptional merit during
the past year .are given an opportu-
nity to play before a Hill auditorium,
audience. Those taking part in to-
morrow's concert will be from the
voice, piano and violin .departments.
Their program will be as follows:
Etude, Op. 10, No. 12 ..... ,...Chopin
Valse Chromatique..........Godard
Gage Clark, '22, S. of M.
Birthday Song .........Woodman
Berceuse...........Gretchaninow
Theme and Variations ........Proch
Esther Hollands, S. of M.
Concerto, E minor..........Nardini.
Allegro moderato; Andante can-"
tabile;
Allegrett6 giocoso
Josephine Connable, S. of M.
Faith in Spring, The WGanderer,
Who Is Sylvia? ........Schubert
Richmond Gardner, S. of M.
Carrillon de Bruges.........Versel
Capriccio.............Scarlatti
Lotus Land. ... .....Scott.
Invention in Octaves..........Bach
Mary Louise Maxwell, S. of M.
Myself When Young (Persian Gar-

Unusual tribute was paid to Chimes
when. editorials and a cartoon from
the March issue were reproduced in
full with favorable comment in the
April issue of the "Collegiate Pub-
lisher." The Collegiate Publisher is
a magazine devoted to the interest of
better college publications in ,tie Un-
ited States and Canada.
The cartoon reproduced is the work
of James House, Jr., '24L, art editor
of Chimes. The editorials are in re-
lation to the subject of the cartoon,
"Campus Rumors."
In speaking of the merits of the
work used the Collegiate Publisher
says in part: "We reproduce a car-
toon and an editorial from the Mich-
igan Chimes, campus opinion month-
ly of the University of Michigan,
worthy of extraordinary praise, in line
with our editorial comment and spe-
cial article resume of the scandal
story situation in the American col-

The student presentation of "The
Thirteenth Chair," a mystery drama,
said by critics to equal, if not to sur-
pass, Mary Robert Rhinehart's "The
Bat," plays at the Mimes theater Fri-
day and Saturday nights. George Bu-i
chanan, '22, who takes the leading
role in the production, is an actor of
no little merit and is well chosen for
so difficult a part.
The plot of the drama surrounds the
mysterious death of Edward Wales,
played by Buchanan, who during a se-
ance with the spirit world is struck
dead by an unknown hand. The plot
thickens when the police discover that
at the time of his death, NVJr. Wales
was endeavoring to ascertain the mur-
derer of his closest friend, through
spiritualistic means. Investigation
casts suspicion upon all who were
present at the seance, .which is not
cleared until the last few minutes be-
fore the final curtain. The play,
which is well handled by its produc-
ers, maintains great interest through-
out the performance.
Tickets go on saletThursday, and
may be 'obtained at the box office of
the Mimes theater from 10 to 12
o'clock Thursday morning, from 2 to.
6 o'clock that afternoon and from 7
to 9 o'clock that evening. The ticket
sale will continue from 10 to 12
o'clock and from 2 to 6 o'clock Friday
and Saturday.
w.t. r.te un n m. ix a !

MICHIGIIAN UNION
-. (At 12:30 A. M.)
President
James Stevens, 250.
Thomas Underwood 441.
Robert Neale 273
Thomas Lynch 587, '
Recording Secretary
Bert Uebele 540. .
John M. Burge 754.
Literary Vice-President
(At 12:30 A. M.)
James Hume 260.
Robert Adams 266.
Engineering Vice-President
(Final Vote)
Frank ' E. Camp 205.
John W. Ross 402.
Combined Departments
Vice-presidents_
(Final Vote).
(Dents, Homoeops, Pharmics)t
Gilbert T. Ely 83.,
Robert Winslow 59. 4
John Searle 112.
President Student Council
(At 12:30 A. M.)
John W, Ross 584.
Vernon F. Hillery, 964.
Student Councilmen at-Large
(At 12:30 A. M.)
Robert. Martin 227.
Robert Knode 787.
Stanley Muirhead 696.'
Harry C. Clark 195._
Robert V. Rice 383.
John B.' Lawton 414.
' Robert C. Moriarty 254.-
Students' Christian Association
(At 12:30 A. M.),
,President
Julius B. Glasgow 202.
Burton E. Dunlop 246.
Robert E. Adams 355.
Paul A. Rehmus 216.°
FINAL RESULTS
STUDENT COUNCLMEN
Junnior Architects
Earl Lundin 22.
Howard Farley 17.
Junior Pharnies
Russel Taylor 8.
Frederick L. Fischer 6.
Junior Homoeops
William LeFever 3.
C. H. Peachey 7.

W. A. Cotten 89.
Soph Engineers
Jphn Polhamus 85.
C. A. Campbell 84.
Junior Lits
(12:30 A.M. )
Albert J. Parker 133.
Howard Liverance 190.
James Hume 158.
Burton Dunlop 135.
Nathan W. Robertson 111.
Lawrence Snell 142.
Sopi Lits -
-(12:30 A. M. )
Edward Murane 134.
George Troost 76.
Harry Kipke 257.
Walter Scherer 153.
' . A. Cotton, '23E, was elected
president of the Engineering society
with iR. E. Everett, '22E, as vice-
president. :The other officers are:
Treasurer, W: C. Kratz, '24E, and sec-
retary, Henry -Hubbard, '23E. The of-
ficers of the Architectural society
were: President, E. H. Lundin, '23A;
vice-president, E.- L. Kline, '23A;
treasurer, H L. Farley, '23A; and
secretary, A. K. Hyde, '24A.
Women Elect Officials -
Frances Ames, '23, was elected pres-
ident of the Women's league by a large
majority in yesterday's elections. Bal-
loting for women candidates was held
in University hall. The other officers
of the league ~ are: Vice-president,
Laura Mills, '23; recording secretary,
Susan Fitch, '24; corresponding secre-
tary, Catherine Stafford, '24; tr~asur-
er, Helen Delbridge, '24; senior repre-
sentative, Beatrice Champion, '23;
junior representatives; Frieda Diek-
hoff, '24, Dorothy Weimer, '24; soph=
amore representative, Edna-Kadow.
Grace Fry, '23, was elected pres-
ident of the Women's Athletic asso-
ciation. Other officers selected were:
Vice-president, Marions Miller, '24;
secretary, Josephine Connable, '23;
treasurer, Dorothy Brown, '23. Joyce
Van Alstine, '23, Louis Miller, '24, and
Alma Crouse, '25, were named senior,
junior and sophomore representatives,
respectively.
Figures on all of the women's elec-
tions were unavailable from officials
in charge of the. courting;
NEW FR ATERNITY
RECOGNIZED HERE
Omicron Chapter of Phi Beta Del-
ta, having fulfilled the resident re-
quirements of the University, ha been
officially recognized as a general i.o
ternity on the campus, it was yester-
day announced.
Phi Beta Delta has established chap-
ters in various of the larger universi'
ties in the East and Far West, and is
now organizing chapters in the large
er of the mid-western universities.
The '.parent chapter is at Columbia
university, where its ,organization
dates back to 1903.
The fraternity is at present located
at :915 EastAnn Street.
CO ERCE CLUB TO HEAR
DETROIT INSURANCE MAN

has contributed

real, and
etin from
922.

den).......... .....Lehmann leges. Here apparently the quarrel
Mavaurneen.................Lang is not with the outside influences-nor
The Irish Guards ..........German with the city newspapers and national
Thomas Dewey, '23, S. of M. magazines, nor with vehement public
(Continued on Page Ten) and private scandal mongers outside
of the college, but with the under-
Watch for t1Ie " "'s." Todar k W" isvM" i'tr adu sthe .sijlanf heAw r, Mn..

"Life Insurance as a Professik
will be the subject of an address
be delivered before Commerce c&
students by Mr. Ernest W. Owen, ma
ager of the Detroit division of t

t

ei

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