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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY 'O

CI1 £tlign Z xt
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Suoscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street,
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The- Daily at tle
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor.................Hugli W. Hitchcock
City Editor............................... E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-- .
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. F. Adams Hughston McBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials.. T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Supplement Editors.................T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Sporting Editor ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor .................................E R. Meiss
.Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates Julian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowel1 S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arr.old Fleig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising......................F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publication .......................... Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts .................................. John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation ............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule . A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Xurane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe

'n-

. _ ,.

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1921
Night Editor-HUGHSTON McBAIN
BASKET SQUABBLES WITH THE EAST
Although Michigan and the East were at one
time continually at swords points with one an-
other athletically, it is now a rare occasion on which
our Varsity mixes in with an eastern squad on the
floor of Waterman gymnasium, and even less often
does Ferry field witness a repetition of the old
East-vs.-Michigan struggles.
Now, however, according to action taken in the
last meeting of the Board in Control of Athletics, the
Wolverines will compete in basketball with two
eastern teams this season, with Carnegie Tech on
Dec. 29, and with Colgate on Dec. 30 and 31. Both
contests will be played in Ann Arbor.
Such schedules with colleges and universities
Soutside our ordinary realm - the Conference -
should make for something of a continuance of
Michigan's old-time policy of wide competition. It
does us no harm to take on teams outside the Big
Ten; on the contrary such a plan is exceedingly
valuable to the University. By our competition in
athletics are we known. The high school athlete
at Hinkle's Junction, N. Y., or at Poppy Center,
Cal, learns of Michigan, not through published
statements regarding her course in the Metamor-
physis of the Invertebrate, but through the teams
which Michigan sends to the state in which the
Hinkle's Junction or Poppy Center boys reside.
They learn of her through her prowess on the field,
the diamond, the track or the basket floor. Conse-
quently, the scope of Michigan depends, to a con-
siderable extent at least, on the work of her ath-
letes in foreign fields - and no one can gainsay the
fact.
Not that our academic achievements do not re-
flect themselves in every man or woman who is
graduated from Michigan and goes elsewhere to
enter the world of business and work; as a matter
of fact, the academic side of our institution actually
constitutes the vital part, the soul, of the name and
spirit of Michigan. But, at the same time, it is the
popular reputation of the University which we are
now considering, and in no way practically can this
reputation be so enlarged, extended, and made solid
and lasting as in athletics. We therefore welcome
this year's contests with Colgate and Carnegie In
-stitute of Technology, in the hope that this new
movement toward regular competition with the
East.will be continued steadily, year by year.
MAKING BETTER CITIZENS
The main purpose of a university education, if
the courses, curricula, and methods of teaching of
the various institutions of higher education in the
United States are to be taken as a criterion, is to
give the student a theoretical training in whatever
branch of learning he is pursuing. When the stu-
dent has left the protecting walls of his alma mater
and finds himself face to face with a hard, action-
wanting world, he discovers that it is some time be-
fore he can fully apply his theories and hypothe-
sies to the needs and demands of the business
world. It is with the avowed intention, therefore,
of preparing the student to enter the domain where
deeds accomplished mark a man's value and rank
among his fellowmen that the department of so-
ciology of the University has this fall added to its
already extensive program of study - courses
which will give 'the world, trained, practical work-

ers, who, from the moment they leave the Univer-
sity will be fully equipped to take up the impor-
tant duties expected of college graduates and Amer-
ican citizens.
In the field of sociology, especially, there is a
pressing need for men and women who know how
to combine theory with practice in producing re-
sults which will make for better community and
general social conditions. Thus these courses will
include practical research in such lines of work as
social administration, community surveys and sta-
tistics, education of abnormal children, psychiatric
social work and child welfare.
Working in harmony with the purposes of these
new branches of study, this week a special oppor-
tunity for hearing men who have already made
names for themselves as sociologists and crinnol-
ogists is offered to students in the sociology de-
partment. The Michigan State Conference of So-
cial' Workers is this year holding its annual meet-
ing in Ann Arbor, with a program of lectures deal-
ing with economics, sociology, and criminology.
Thus two forces are combinng to bring about a
praiseworthy result, namely, of making the stu-
dents who leave the University as its representa-
tives not only well-trained, prepared-to-meet-the-
demands-of-the-world workers, but also citizens of
the highest mental and moral calibre.
THE GENTLE RAZZ
The carpenter and riveter are of great service to
humanity. They are always knocking, but when
they do knock they hit the nail on the head and the
result is something worth while.
Unfortunately not all knockers are carpenters
and riveters.
No man has a right to find fault -with the way
others are doing thingsunless he has done the
thing better himself.
The man whose idea of campus activities is flirt-
ing with a lamp-post has no right to criticise the one
who does go out for activities in the effort to ac-
complish something worthwhile for his own benefit
and that of his school. The man who considers his
mission in life the tucking away of three "squares"
a day has no right to tell another man that he isn't
doing enough work.
The moral is, that if you are one of those peo-
ple who must knock - knock yourself first.
Mr. Zero, of auction block fame, seems to have
developed into a second Coxie.
~siTheuTelescope
"Romnance'", Our Own Opera
(Prologue - A Court Scene)
The scene was in a royal court,
Where kings and queens did come;
Then entered knights and princes, too,
They were the bluebloods, by gum.
Sir Erm was there, in a suit of mail,
And Erma wore clothes of silk;
But the whole court laughed when Erman ar-
rived.
Sipping a glass of milk.
The closest of all unto the king
As usual was fluffy Ermine,
And right in the middle of everything
Were our old friends, Herman and Sherman.
- Erman.
(To be continued when we see or are fit)
Inquisitive one-How come your cheeks so pretty
and red?
Rosy-cheeked one-They are painted, -by God.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Gone is young John Blocksmith,
An aviator he,
Who took his girl up in the clouds
'N' lost all control, you see.
Heard in Keim's

"How in the world can you eat pie a la mode an
hour after a heavy supper?"
"With a fork," came the facetious reply.
- Steve.
This Doesn't Apply to All
Maxine Kenton's
Twice as fair
Since she went an'
Bobbed her hair.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Absence Makes the Heart Grow Fonder of
Someone Else." - Ermine.
Friends and others
Take advice,
Don't play poker,
Don't shoot dice.
But if you gamble and don't pay,
You'll live to play some other day, -maybe.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.os a.
M., 7:o5 a. m., &:1o a. m. and hourly to g:io
P. M.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. m. and every two hours to
9: 48 p. m.
Local Cars -Fast Bound--5:55 a.m., 7':00 a.
m. ande twohours to 9:o p. in., 1t:00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-i40 p. in., 12.25
a. m., 1:15 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :so a. in., 2:40 p.
m.
To Jackson and Kamaazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, o n:4a.n., 12:48,-2:48, 4:48.
ToJackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
P. in.

1921

OCTOBER

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90 81

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1921
15
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29

If you are . hungry,
or
If you are thirsty,
or
If you just need a friend,
Drop in at that friendly place.
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
THERE'S A DEAL OF
KNOWLEDGE IN BOOKS
-and far from the least of these, as every successful
person knows, is the bank boob.
Acquire the bank book habit and you will succeed.
Pay it by check, it is the easiest and safest way
FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
101-105.South Main Street. 330 South State Street
(Nickels Arcade)
Member Federal System

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
ENGAGE
-
8 CHAFARIK'S ~
ORCHESTRA
(OF YPSILANTI)
For Any Occasion
Phonepsi 822-M...

. wr w M

A complete line of textbooks and supplies

for all colleges act both stores
GR *AHAM
Deoth ends of the diagonal I'alk

{I 1

Few students like the
same food every week
"I get away from. menus that
repeat weekly by eating at the
Arcade Cafeteria!"

It's upstairs in
Nickels' Arcade

p/

"When You Buy, Buy Quality"
For Your Winter Suit
A small cheek in dark brown
Or an oxford grey with a neat stripe
Possibly a grey tweed sport suit
Hand tailored, but ready to put on
Made for us by
Hirsh, Wickwire Co.
Hickey-Freeman Co.
WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848

Dear Erm:
Why is a professors?

Yours,
Hugh Rona.

Esteemed Hugh-We suppose, to seat the co-eds
in the front row.
Famous Closing Lines
"On the watch," said the pickpocket as he skill
fully removed the gold chain from his victim's
vest. ERM.

STATE

STREET

AT

LIBERTY

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