100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 13, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE, WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

Y

sit 4311

Iaii4

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY ,A" NIGHT WU
SERVICE

VOL. XXXII. No. 16

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1921

PRICE FIVE CE

'25 GET-TOGETHER
AT UNION PROJES
ITSELF9ASUCCESS
VAUDEVILLE AND BOXING MATCH
FURNISH YEARLINGS WITH
ENTERTAINMENT
HENDERSON ADDRESSES
MEN ON OPPORTUNITIES

Informality
muIisic

Is Keynote
and Speeches
Evening

of Mixer;
Liven

Complete informality, plentiful re-
freshments, and a widely varied pro-
gram of entertainment guaranteed
an evening of unhampered amusement
to the hundreds of freshmen that at-
tended the first big mixer and get-
together meeting 'of the year given by
the Union for the '25 men last night.
The men were kept busy continually
circling around the assembly hall un-
der the supervision of committeemen
and the general spirit of informality
was fostered by the short talks of the
speakers on the program.
The evening was opened by selec-
tions from the Michigan Union dance
orchestra, which played music dur-
ing intermissions. A. O. Cuthbert,
'22E, Varsity 'cheer leader, led the
men in some Michigan yells and in-
troduced Jack Kelly, '24L, the stu-
dent speaker, who obliged with his
league house story and some pungent
advice to his incoming classes.
Mike Chon, '23, and Edward McCal-
lum, '24, followed with some special
music on the saxophone and piano.
Cuthbert, the master of ceremonies,
then introduced Prof. William D.
Henderson, of the University Exten-
sion division, the principal speaker,
who addressed the men of '25 on the
theme, "The Golden Age of Tomor-
row"
ZOOLOGICAL JOURNAL CLUB
HEARS ADDRESSES TONIGHT
Carl Hubbs, curator of fishes in the
Museum, C. W. Creaser, assistant in
zoology, and T. L. Hankinson are
scheduled to speak at a meeting of the
Zoological Journal club at 7:30
o'clock tonight in room Z-231 of the
zoological laboratory.
Mr. Hankinson will speak on the
progress of the icthyological survey
of the Great Lakes basin, Mr. Creaser
will relate the results of last sum-
mer's work on the lampreys of Michi-
gan, and Mr. Hubbs will discuss the
"ecology of the fishes of the Cheboy-
gan drainage.
FISHER CALLS FOR MORE
'25 BASKETBALL TRYOUTS
About 45 freshmen were out for this
year's freshman basketball squad last
night, and some good material was on
the floor, but Coach Fisher wants more
than 45 freshmen out for the team
and'hts issued a call for all freshmen
interested to report at Waterman gym-
nasium at 6:45 o'clock tonight. With
a large turnout only will a team prop-
erly representing the freshman class
be possible.
GREATER NEWARK CLUB
MEETS FRIDAY NIGHT

DAILY EXTRAS FOR ALL
FOUR CONFERENCE GAMESILL CLSSES HOLD
Football extras will be pub-
lished by the Michigan Daily. givE-
ing a play by play story of each
of the four Conference gaes. Several Engineers Named Tuesday
Provisions are complete that Found Ineligible for
will give The Daily facilities for Office
immediate communication with
their correspondents at each of REVISED LIST OF NOMINEES
tesegamesAt linosandIS OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCED
Wisconsin, The Daily 'will work
with a special leased wire. All class elections will be held to-
'Phone service at the Ohio and morrow at times and places to be
Minnesota games will connect posted in bulletins in each school.
press box and The Daily office. The junior lits selected as nominees
In addition to an exact play for class president, yesterday, Ted
by play story of the game, each Bank and Lawrence Snell; for vice-
extra will contain a number of president, Lucile Welty and Helen
photographs of members of both Partlow; for secretary, Virginia Bro-
teams, scrimmages, and for the del and Sadye Harwick; for treasur-
"away" games, pictures of the er, Lee Mills and Thomas Lally.
gridiron. Soph Engineers
Watch for the pink sheet It The freshman engineers nominated
will be The Daily Extra for the tions were as follows: President, J.
Ohio game? P. Bernard and C. A. Campbell; for
Previous records of extras will vice-president, C. A. Ross and J. W.
probably be shattered. The staffs Hostrup; for secretary, Henry Hub-
year are competing with one an- bard and C. R. Webb; for treasurer,
other for the honor of first place F. S. Kratz and S. H. Morgan.
in point of time. It is estimated The freshman engineers nomiated
that the first start of the press W. H. Webb and C. W. Merriam for
will occur not more than 90 see- president; R. L. Underwood and R.
ends after the final whistle. S. Scribner for vice-president; Mu-
Watch for the pink sheet? riel Ray for secretary; J. R. Gilpin
I_,_ and N. W. Hammett for treasurer.
Since Ray was the only nominee for
secretary, she was declared elected
to that office.
Several of the nominees of the ju-
VO Enior engineers as announced in yes-
terday's Daily were found to be ineli-
gible,and consequently the candidates
-who had received the next highest
number of votes replaced them. The
Today's Session of Conference Opens revised official list follows:
at 9 O'clock with Business Senior Engineers
SST eSenior engineer nominations: Pres-
ident, Milton Dixon and G. W. Mc-
Cordic; for vice-president, l. I. Fox
PRESIDENT CLARK E. HIGBEE and Milton Goetz; for secretary, Eu-
UNABLE TO ATTEND AFFAIR gene Harbeck and E. S. Bradley; for
treasurer, H. D. Tubbs and G. M.
Due to the illness of President Chute.
Clark E. Higbee, of Grand Rapids, Junior engineer nominations: Pres-
Vice-president Fred R. Johnson, of ident, P. G. Goebel and R. H. Row-
Lansing, called the first meeting of land; for vice-president, William Cot-
the Michigan State Conference of So- ton; for secretary, E. C. Haug and R.
cial Work to order last night in room H. Piper; for treasurer, W. F. Moore
316 of the Union. Chairman Johnson and K. S. Anderson. Another meet-
proceeded to call on a local commit- ing of the junior engineers will be
teeman, Arthur Vf. Wood, professor held at 4 o'clock this afternoon in
of sociology, for announcements con- room 348 engineering building for the
cerning the meeting which is to be purpose of selecting another candidate
held for a period of three days. A for vice-president.
program of addresses by Dr. Olin, Dr.
Barrett, and a short talk by Mr. Wor
den, of the State Tubercular associa-
tion, followed.U
This morning's session will open PN T
at 9 o'clock with a bu'siness meeting, PERlMANt10oASSOCIATION
followed at 10 o'clock by a general
session on the subjects: "Probation AT
and Patrol", Judge Stewart Hanley
of Detroit presiding; "The Fundamen-
tals of Probation" introduced by "BIG BILL" DAY, 'VOL, WILL ACT
Charles L. Shute, secretary of the Na- AS TOASTMASTER AT OHIO
tional Probation association of New GATHERING
York city, and discussion opened by
Edwin M. Mulock, chief probation of-
ficer in the recorder's court, Detroit, A permanent Western Conference
110' 1. he ecrde a out, Deroi,:association of Cleveland will be or-
and "The Michigan Parole System andasociat.oevesand will ber-
How It Is Operating" by Fred E. ganized at the first annual dinner of
Janette, state commissioner of pardon alumni of Western Conference col-
and patrol of Lansing, and discussion leges Monday evening, Oct 17 at the
opend by W. W. Hodges, county agent, University club of Cleveland.
Cadillac. Former Federal Judge William
The programs will be continued this Day, '00I, ("Big Bill" Day of Michi-
afternoon and evening. gan), will be toastmaster and master
__t__nn__nd______g of ceremonies. Coaches Yost o
Michigan. Wilce of Ohio State, Stagg
SIGMA. DELTA CHI of Chicago, Steihm of Indiana, Mc-
MEETING CALLED Devitt of Northwestern, Deits of Pur-
due, Zuppke of Illinois, Richards of
Wisconsin, Williams of Minnesota, and
Sigma Delta Chi, national journal- Jones of Iowa have been invited as

istic society, will meet for the first guests.
time this year tonight at the Michigan Joseph Fogg of Wisconsin, ,John
Union. Matters pertaining to the in- McGovern and Bert Baston of Minne-
ned workings of the organization are sota, Stanley Wells and Hiram Col
on the business program, of Michigan are among the All-Amer
Plans will be laid for the coming ican and All-Western football players
year's work. who are expected to attend.
Michigan, as dean of the Western
Must Have Bursley Permit for Dances universities, will be represented by a
Permission must be secured from large number of alumni. Reserva
Joseph A. Bursley, Dean of Men, by tions may be made by mail through
any organization wishing to give a Carlton L. Schmock, 1139 Guardiar
dance. building, Cleveland, Ohio.

COUNCIL MAKING ELABORATE PLANS
FOR HOME-COMING DAY, OCTOBER 22

Elaborate preparations are being
made by the Student council for the
observation of home-coming day, which
will be the day of the Ohio State game,
Oct. 22. At the meeting of the coun-
cil which was held last evening at 7
o'clock in the Union, a committee con-
sisting of Renaud Sherwood, '22, R. F.
Wieneke, '22, and P. H. Scott, '22, was
appointed to make suitable arrange-
ments. The council plans to have all
streets and houses decorated for that
day and to make it a real home coming
occasion.
The subject of proper insignia for
cheer leaders was discussed at the
meeting and it was decided that white
sweaters with a blue M. C. L. should
be awarded to successful candidates
for positions. The Student council
also went on record as favoring the
location of the block "M" in the west
stands at the Minnesota game. The
"M" in this case would be composed
of freshmen. Disciplining of freshmen
by unauthorized persons was alsoa
matter fordiscussion and it was de-
cided to bring offenders against this
ruling of the University before the
Student council when necessary.'
NEW_ CHOIR AIMS
FOR 100 VOICES
Chorus Will Make First Appearance
of Year at Sunday Service
November 6
DIVISION OF PERSONNEL SET
AT 70 WOMEN AND 80 MEN
Organization of a University choir
of 100 voices is being planned by the
University services committee in
charge of the series of Sunday eve-
ning meetings in Hill auditorium
which. begin Oct. 23. It is expected
that the chorus will make its first ap-
pearance at the Sunday service on
Nov. 6, and from that time on will be
a feature of the -gatherings.
The choir is to be composed of 70
women and 30 men, and will be under
the direction of George Oscar Bowen
of the School of Music. Mr. Bowen
has had considerable experience in
leading large -community choruses,
and at the present time has charge of
music in the Ann Arbor high school.
Everyone interested in chorus work1
of this type is asked to meet Mr. Bow-
en in the auditorium of Lane hall at
4 o'clock Thursday and Friday after-
noons of this week.
School of Music students not con-
nected with the Choral union or any
of the other musical organizations
are invited to join the new chorus.
Freshmen, however, are not eligible.
"THREE PILLS IN A BOTTLE"
TONIGHT BY PLAYERS CLUB
Persons Interested in University May
Join the Organization
This Evening
"Three Pills in a Bottle" will be
presented by the Players club at 8
o'clock tonight in Sarah Caswell An-
gell hall. Following the play there
will be special music under the di-
rection of R. B. Ritter, '22. The aims
I of the club will be presented during
the meeting and those interested in
joining the organization may do so.
Faculty, students and friends of the
- University are eligible to membership.
Admission will be free.

s SOPHOMORE LITS MEET FOR
NOMINATION AT 4:00 TODAY
a All sophomore lits will meet at 4
- o'clock today in University Hall for
h the purpose of nominating officers for
a the year. The elections will be held
Friday. A full attendance is desired.

REGENTS DISCONTINUE
ANNUAL CONVOCATION
By action of the Board of Re-
gents, the annual fall Convoca-
tion of the University is to be
discontinued, effective this year.
It is felt that with the opening
Assembly, which was held for
the first time this year, the con-
vocation is no longer necessary.
The Senate reception, usually
held in connection with the Con-
vocation, Is in a sense replaced by
President and Mrs. Burton's days
f"at home," on which they receive
the members of the University
faculty.
OHIO STATE GAME
SEATS SOLD OUT
Seats for the Ohio State game, Oct.
22, have been completely sold and
late applications are being returned
with the notation that no more tickets
are available.
With the filing of numerous late or-
ders, the stands were sold out en-
tirely, and those who have been late
in returning their applications will
have to depend upon general admis-
sion to see the contest
The notice which the athletic office
is inclosing with the unfilled orders
advises that the men mail their or-
der for general admission tickets im-
mediately. Arrangements have been
made for the construction of .an in-
cline platform at the east end of the
field to accommodate 4,000 spectators,
and the number of tickets which are
placed on sale corresponds to this
number. These tickets can be pur-
chased at any time and the associa-
tion urges that those who wish to see
the game file their orders early. The
number of general admissions will
be limited to 4,000 and when these
are sold there will be no way in
which the tardy ones can gain admis-
sion to the field. General admission
tickets are priced t0$1.50.
Approximately 200 unfilled orders
for reserved seats are being prepared
for their return to the applicants.
Many of these were for four or five
seats.
Distribution of tickets will begin not
earlier than the 18th of this month,
as stated on the explanatory matter
on the rear of the order blank. This,
it is pointed out, is ample time for
the applicants to receive their tickets.
RN BOVEN AND CRESS
PURCHASE TOGGERY SHOP
Two Michigan graduates, Peter Van
Boven, '21, and Earl Cress, '20, pur-
chased the Varsity Toggery Shop at
1107 East University Wednesday morn-
ing from E. J. Lohr, who has operated
the establishment for several years.
The new owners expect to make a
complete change in the way that the
store will be managed.
As soon as it is possible to clear
out the present stock, an entire new
line of up-to-date men's furnishings
with ready made suits will be installed.
The interior of the store will be slight-
ly changed. Peter Van Boven will be
the active manager, while Earl Cress
plans to continue in his present posi
tion of Ann Arbor bond salesman for
Howe, Snow, Cogan, and Burtels of
Grand Rapids and Detroit.
The new proprietors are well known
on the campus. Van Boven last year

was captain of the Varsity basebal
team, on which he played shortstop
and for two years previous to tha
he was the second baseman. In 1916
Cress played on the All-Fresh foot
ball team. He later devoted his time
to publication work, being advertising
. manager of The Daily in 1918.

GIANTS BREAK TIE"
WIT TE YANKEES
WHBY WINNING21
SCHNEIDER KNOCKS .TWO-BAG.
GER IN SEVENTH, BRINGING
IN DECISIVE TALLY
MC GRAW NEEDS 1MORE
WIN FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
Fray Would Have Gone to Extra
Innings But for Error
by Ward
(By Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 12.-Frank Schneid-
er, the Giant bulky catcher, pulled one
of Carl May's underhand twisters in
to left center for a two base hit in the
seventh inning at the Polo grounds
this afternoon and sent home the tal-
ly that won the seventh game of the
World's Series for the New York Na-
tional league champions. The Giants
by winning this contest 2 to 1 went
for the first time into the lead in the
World's Championship race, making
the count stand 4 and 3.
The McGraw men need .but one
more victory to give them the series
and the big end of the money.
Today's game, probably the best
played and certainly the snappest
and tensest in the series, Was one
worthy of the two pennant inning
clubs. It was witnessed by a holida
crowd of 36,503 persons, a crowd
which was by all odds the most de-
monstrative of all the great throngs
which have gathered for these games
Carl Mays, while the loser, has tc
be given credit for a notable perform
ance on the mound. The blonde is-
sourian was steadier than Douglas
not issuing a pass and allowing bu
6 hits to 8 for his opponent and bul
for a slip on the part of Ward in th
seventh inning the game might easil
have gone into extra innings with th
score tied 1 to 1.
HROF.COWOEN IHELPINS7
STUDENT PLAYWRISHT6
MAY ARRANGE WEEKLY CONSUL
TATION OF PROSPECTIVE
AUTHORS
Prof. Roy W. Cowden, of the rhetor
ic' department, has issued a call lo
all students interested in writin
plays to meet with him in room 20:
West hall at 4 o'clock this afternoo
The meeting is intended for thos
whose interest is more than superfil
cial, and who have already some defi
nite idea as to the work they wish ti
accomplish.
It is the intention of Professor Cow
den to offer his services to the stu
dents throughout the year. While v
class will be organized, he plans t
meet them frequently at cosulta
tion, and, if necessary, to arrange
special consultation period each weel
at which time he will see only th
prospective playwrights.
Through these consultations th
students will be helped to develo
their own ideas into play forms. La
er in the year it is planned to pre
sent on the campus several of tb
best plays which are written unde

r Professor Cowden's supervision. Tb
f Players club will probably be aske
to co-operate in the presentation o
the plays.
1 Junior Girls to Meet on Friday
Dean Myra B. Jordan will receive th
t junior girls at a tea at 4 o'clock Fr
6 day afternoon. This meeting is fc
- the purpose of having the girls of tb
e class become better acquainted. TI
g social committee will be elected a3
plans made for the year.

Members of the Greater Newark
club will convene for the first time
this year at 7:30 o'clock Friday night
in room 306 of the Union.
Election of a vice-president and
historian will take place, as well as
formation of a program for the year's
activities.
Wenley Now in Montreal
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the phil-
osophy department, is in Montreal as
ofiicial representative of the Univer-
sity at the centenary held this week at
McGill university. McGill university
was founded in 1821.

I

LECTURE
ru

"

COURSE TICKETS
ODAY

At Wahr's, Graham's and Slater's Bookstores
(Prices '$2.50 and $3.00)

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan