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April 26, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

except Monday during the University
Student.Publication..
HE ASSOCIATED PRESS
" exclusively entitied t" the nse fr
atche credited to it or not otherwie
the local news published thaereis.
e s at Ax~, whboa, lLVichi :an, gmmexs+

Sf.
g, Manard Street,
2414.
words, if signed, the sigia-
but as an evidence of faith,
in The Daily at the discre-
The Daily office. Unsigned
ration. N. manuscript will
ostage.
>rse the sentiments expressed

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
)R............BREWST'ER P. CAMPBELL
. ......... .......Joseph A. Bernstein
............ ....8.P. 1Lovejoy, Jr.
...... B. Young

G. P. Overton
M. B. Stail
Paul Watzel

1hairman...................L. Armstrong Kern
bdorfer E. R. Meiss,
Arews
Editor.............Thornton W. Sargent,-Jr.
........................,......George E. Sloan
.... ........Sidney B. Coates
....................George Reindel
........... ...............Elizabeth Vickery
........... .................... . R. Meiss
Assistants
Q Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
Winona A. Hibbard Kathrine Montgomery
Harry D. Hoey R. C. Moriarty
Agnes Holmquist J. F. Pontius
H. E. Howlett Lillian Scher
Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
lin Victor' Klein Virginia Tryon
Marion Koch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 980
AGER................VERNON F. HILLERY'
..............................Albert J. Parker
. . . . John J. Hamel, Jr.
................... ....athan! W. Robertson
.............................Walter K. Scherer
......................Herod C. Hunt
Assistants
David Park D. C. Maltby
'arks 3. A. Dryer Harvey Reed
T, H. Wolfe George Rockwood
Paul Blum E. D. Armantrout
f Stanley Monroe Edward Conlin
William Graulich Lawrence Favrot
DNESDAY, APRIL 26, 1922
ight Editor-M. B. STAHL

. A. Donahue

i

ART THE THIRD YEAR
a, interested in the possibility of
to make Michigan men out of the
an material that is brought into the
year, met in the fall of 1920 to per-
r system for freshman instruction.
pt, sad to say, proved an utter fail-

ur tor ers nas sine oeen punisneG. jMr. orman
not only laughs at the belief that educational taxes
are becoming overburdensome, but has compiled
figures to scare it entirely away.
In scouting what he terms "this ridiculous idea",
the speaker points to the American vice of extrav-
agance. "During the last year," he says, "we spent
approximately $22,500,o00,000 for luxuries, .and
about $I,300,000,000 for all kinds of education, in-
cluding elementary, secondary, normal school and
university. Out of this sum less than $300,000,000
went to the support of our higher institutions of
learning. Of the total luxury bill, $300,000,000
was spent for face powders and cosmetics, $oo,-
oo0,0o for cigarettes, $8ooooo,ooo for cigars,
$500,000,ooo for tobacco and snuff, and $50,000,000
for chewing gum. We spent twice as much for face
powder and cozetics as we spent for higher edu-
cation. The total cigarette, cigar, and tobacco bill
was about $2,oo,oooooo, nearly $oo,ooo,ooo
more than was spent for all kinds of education; and
the total chewing gum bill was nearly twice as much
as we spent for the training of teachers in the
United States"
These figures speak only too plainly to be mis-
taken, and as Mr. Coffman points out .later in his
speech, "The cry of the man who says he cannot
support our universities is likely to be the cry of the
man who wishes to spend more for luxuries." If the
time ever comes when institutions of higher learn-
ing are really a burden upon the nation, then it will
be because universities will have becom'e so vast in
proportions that the great majority of American
citizens will be college trained, and college trained
men and women will be willing to bear some burden
in order that succeeding generations may have the
benefit of that same advantage.
' THE FROSH WIELD A BIG STICK
Members of the freshman classes, in voting Mon-
day to ostracise from their ranks one first-year man
who has been branded "undesirable", partly be-
cause of failure to wear his grey pot, have shown a
good spirit and a pleasing willingness as a body to
support the Student council in its enforcement of
yearling rules.
Their action should prove .a lesson to any remain-
ing delinquents, by showing them part of what may
happen if they, too, insist on continuing in their
erring frays. Bani hment from one's .own group
class is about as severe a punishment as could be
administered: the "man without a class" is in a
decidedly unenviable position.
Unless some of the daring spectators who per-
ford acrobatic feats on top of the concrete stands
during baseball games desist, the Univdrsity hospi-
tal may find itself with a few cases of broken bones
and cracked skulls on its hands, and somebody will
have to stand the cost of a funeral or so.
The Columbia Spectator waxed mildly rebel-
lious recently. "Heigh-ho !" it' groaned, "Don't pro-
fessors ever get spring fever? Or is it unethical
for them to cut classes?" Probably the latter: we
doubt if they are .much more hardened to the influ-
ences of balmy weather than are their students.
The price has dropped on at least one commod-
ity - a round trip from Detroit on the M. C. All
aboard for the Ann Arbor special!
fe Teleoe,
My Tumbleddown Hack in Athlone
I'm' a long way from home
And my thoughts ever roam
To ould Erin far over the sea;
There my Ford has a berth,
Hocked fro all it is worth,ge
And my flivver is calling for me:
Oh, I want to go back to that tumbledown hack
Where you never can open a door,
Just to clamber right in, and to start for a spin,
Just to get that old bacl ache pnce more.
There's a light, not 'so bright, guiding me home

tonight
Down the long road of white cobblestones ;
Just "three balls" keep be back.
From that tumbledown hack,
From that tumbledown hack in Athlone.
It Is Rumored
That Ann Arbor merchants held a co-operative
meeting the other night, and to conclude the affairs
they all arose and sang that famous song of prices,
entitled,
"United We Stand, Divided We Fall".
Oh, for some national hero to come to our com-
munity and put the "pry" into "pryces".
And Then She Blushed
The professor was trying to explain a proposi-
tion to a certain young lady in his class.. The young
lady was not exactly dense. She simply couldn't
understand what the professor meant. After the
first half hour of discussioh the following conver-
sation took place:
"Do you understand it now ?"
"No, professor, I'm' afraid it doesn't penetrate."
"But it's as plain as the nose on your face."
"Well, I can't see that."
It is obvious that the young lady was not cross-
eyed.
Famous Closing Lines
"There's no point to that," said the practical
joker as he handed the stenographer a rubber pen-
cil. ERM.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ana Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Liitd and Express Cars :6. 6:eo
a. M., 7:so a. a., $:.o a. to., a:ooa.. im. and
hourly to q:05 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of An
-r r), 9:47 a. "*# andevely two hrs to
9:7P R 1LclCars ?past B ound-5:ag,7:.*
mn. and ievery two hours' to -*:oo p. mn., M~O
p. an. To psilasti only-tz:4o.% . i.-23~a
a. an., x:i5 :a. n.
To Saline, change at Ypailanti.
Local Cars' West Bound- 7:se a. in., s:4e
p. as.
To Jackson aandala:nasoo-Limited cars:
8:47~ 1*47. a.n. t--:, -2.47. 4:47.
To Jackansad Lanaing-- Iited: 1:47
Q.. Mn.

Do You Need ExtrasI
Send for catalog describing over 400 courses in -Histo
Mathematics, Chemistry, Zoology, Modern Languages,
Philosophy, Sociology, etc., given by corresponden
how credits earned may be applied on present colleg
HOME STUDY DEPT. cic

A New Line of

Y

AT

1922
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APRIL
T W T

1922
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21 22
28 29

2
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16
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HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE;
617 L"ACKARD. STREET
Telephone 1792
ii
Wednesday-Thursday
A FIRST NATIONAL
ATTRACTION

I

.1

Tomorrow
English Twills ma
bat-wing ties, in
colour combinatic
duced for the fi
in America. Smai
original patternir

11

All Genuine
the name star

Mack & Co., Main St.
F. W. Gross, Main St.

N.

GRAHAM'

ce

"HUSH"

BOTH STOIFLC

S. Q. DavIs, Toi

J. F.
Wad:

fall, many of those same upperclassmen,
w recruits from the sophomores of the year
met again, and began a second time to per-
working system. This attempt proved the
f the saying, "If at first you don't succeed,
again"; for the system maintained during
t two semesters has been more than sixty
it efficient, according to a recent statement
it .to the advisors by the chairman. of the
tee.
h criticism of the plan has, been raised; of
particularly among the first-year men: too'
zas no doubt been expected of a new and
embryonic organization in the first place,
. the second, probably some few advisors
iled to put their full efforts behind the plan.
whole, however, the men have given the ad-
system a very hearty support, and have so
complished what they set out to, that those
:re influential in originating the system have
ore- than pleased with the results.
arrangements are under way for next year,
start the work off right, all upperclassmen
phomores, - next year's juniors, - are
o be present at a short meeting, scheduled
ight. It will be to their interest, and to the
of the yet-unborn class of 1926, for them
out in full force.
system, as handled this year, has been of in-
due to the freshmen whether they realize it
not: they will later after they have become
zed students of Michigan. The success of
ent committee may doubtless be credited en-
the untiring energy and efforts of its mem-
rticularly those in charge. But The Daily is
itly optimistic to feel that upperclassmen as
now appreciate the value of the advisory
even more than they ever did before, and
ieve truly unhoped-for results next year.
LUXURIES AND EDUCATION
the steadily increasing size of universities
out the country has come a serious doubt
'hether the immense institution of the near
will be able to maintain a proper educa-
fficiency. But more thar a doubt has been
ed upon the part of many 2s to whether the
and this of course applies largely to state
t.ies, will be financially able to support these
of learning.
elieve even silently that the state is being'
d to excess by educational taxes is an un-
ble inconsistency, according to Lotus D.
i, a speaker at the inauguration of Ernest
Lindley to the chancellorship of the Univer-
--L.

:I 11- 11111tt1 1it N Ii1l1111111 111111111
iI
-
- ia teee 'lc h eo
Butnhsbe skdt pa n
- eoetestdn oy
Th eryapoa ytecm
reua otl ovctosaewr
toteuiest uhrte httesu
Iniain aebegvnt

lA nnouni

d convocation will be held.;

Pr

e has some interesting matters

us of the first convocation showed that
:h while, and the packed house proved
dents are interested in such a plan.
en, of eminence whom we hope to be

able to secure for convoeation and acceptances will be announced from time

to time.

Let's be there!

Eleven O'Clock!1

Hill Auditorium.

.

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