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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 26, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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IDAY AN~D NI
SERY]

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN WEDNESDAY APRIL 26, 1922 PRIE

FORCE
FFICIENT TO
FOREIGN
EEDED
"ALLED
MINIMUM
000 Men and
1s Re.
Press)
.-A plea for a
v w ih wnild

ORR REQUESTS TO
B E REINSTATED
Louis T. Orr, who refused to wear
his freshman toque, and who was
ostracised from the class by, 300 of his
classmates at a mass meeting in Hill
auditorium Monday afternoon, exhib-
ited a change of attitude last night,
and issued the following signed ap-
plication to the Student council:
"I~ wish to express my desire to the
Freshman class to be reinstated in the
class. I wish to state that in the fu-
ture I shall conduct myself as will
become a student in the University of
Michigan, and I shall in the future
observe all Michigan traditions. Al-
though there may have been misun-
derstandings I believe mystatement
to observe Michigan traditions will
settle the trouble which has arisen,
I am. making this statement in the
presence of members of my class and
the Student council, and make it of
my own free will." L. T. ORR.

y whUeJ

I woul
ision by
cy and
when
oday by
ershing B Y ,C1li T0 9

and 150,-
o army

Organizations to Contribute Towards
the Goal of
$1,500
SCHEDULE TAG DAY CAMPAIGN
TOMORROW AS SUPPLEMENT
p .----..-

bill, and
vhich has
lately to
prospect
se figure

had

SCHUUL

OVERt

on Ferry Ifield
baseball nine de-
aggregation from
al college by the
. The entire af-
game for the Wol-
never in danger
itz led off Mich-
in the first inn-
er second base.
the first three
s men and with
ngle frise ticket to
the Normalites
e, during, his stay
ltz and Elliot fol-
r three innings
ig Ypsianti got a

' All men, who have volunteered to
distribute tags tomorrow for the cam-
paign to raise $1,500 for the second
Michigan Fresh Air Camp and all oth-
ers who desire to help in this drive,
are to meet for final instructions at
3:39 o'clock this afternoon in the up-
per reading roomli of the Union.
Fraternities Report Tonight
Yesterday fraternity and sorority'
representatives-met, with a large per-
centage of all the members present
and plans were gone over for their
work in the campaign today. Each
house has been asked to assess a
blanket charge to cover every mem-
ber. The money thus received should
be turned in at the Gargoyle office in
the Press building between 7 and 8
o'clock tonight. At this time all hous-
es which were not represented at the
meeting can/ bring their money' andl
receive their tags.
Solicitation of members of the facul-
ty started yesterday and will continue
both -today and tomorrow. All mem-
bers whom it has been impossible to
see can send their checks to Lane hall.
Checks are to be made out to the T nX-
versity bf Michigan Fresh Air fund.
Secure Boys
Arrangements are already being
made with Juvenile courts, mother's
pension bureaus, detention homes, and
children's aid Societies in the cities
of lower Michigan to secure such boys
for attendance at the camp who would
not have such an opportunity in any
other way. It is these neglected boys
of alley, tenement, and the street who
are to be reached by the fresh air,
pure food ,and friendship of the Michi-
gan ca.mp
Petitions Secure
Nominations for
Miore Candidate-s

BURTON TO SPEK
AT CONVOCATION.
SECOND MFETING TO BE HELD AT
11 O'CLOCK AT HILL AU-
DITORIUM
CHOOSES "UNIVERSITY
MORALE" AS SUBJECT
Student Attendance Likely to Decide
Whether Custom is to be Con-
tinued
President Marion L. Burton will
speak on the subject, "University Mor-
ale" .at the second monthly Convoca-
tion which will be held at 11 o'clock
this morning in Hill auditorium. Seats
will be provided for the faculty on
the stage while the student body will
occupy the main floor and the bal-
conies.
May Continue Next Year
This is the second of the monthly
convocations which are being held at
the request of the Student council for
the r.emainder of the year. The Con-
vocation will be made a campus insti-
tution next year, according to Student
council members, providing the stu-
dent body offers- substantial suppor
to the custom by its'attendance.
The attendance at the program this
morning will be accepted by author-
ities as largely a test of the attitude
taken by the campus toward the advis-
ability of continuing the services this
year and next.
The first Convocation which was
held on March 31, when Dr. George
E. Vilcent, president of the Rocke-
feller foundation delivered an address
on "The School and Public Health,"
was attended by a capacity audience.
Classes Dismissed
Following the address by President
Burton the "Yellow and Blue" will be
sung by the audience; completing the
program. All classes except dental
and medical clinics will be dismissed
to enable members of the University
to atend.
WILKIE EXPLAINS WORK
OF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Co-operation between the members
of the Associated Press and the vari-
ous central bureaus was stated by
David J. "Wilkie, manager of the Mich-
igan branch of the Associated Press,
as being responsible .for the success
of the service. He spoke at the Press
club dinner last evening. "With a
membership of 1,300 newspapers, 73,-
000 miles of leased wire, and an an-
nual revenue of $5,500,000, the service
aims to supply the news of the day,"
said Mr. Wilkie.
Eight different languages are em-
ployed in reaching all the reading pub-
lic from Alaska to Argentine and the
Philippines to Porto Rico. The larg-
est office handles 70,000 words per day,
sending out a full service of 16,000
words and many smaller volumes of
500 words.
Mr. Wilkiestated that in his opin-
ion the chief fault of the potential
journalist was being too much in pur-
suit of detail which is an insult to the
readers' intelligence and encourages
a tendendy toward wandering from
the point, Mr. Wilkie stressed sim-
plicity as the cardinal virtue in news
writing and mentioned that a large
vocabulary was not necessary to a
journalistic career.
Mr. Stace of the Grand Rapids Press,
related some incidents in which the
Associated Press proved of inestimable

worth, and pointed out the necessity
of co-operation among the members of
the Associated Press in verifying facts.
SUCCESSORS TO RESIGNED
DEANS TO BE NAMED FRIDAY
Friday, April 28, is the date set for
the next regular meeting of the Board
of Regents. Among matters now wait-
ing final action are the selection of
the successors to Dean Myra B. Jor-
dan and to' Dean W. H. Butts, of the
engineering college.

Edgar H. Ailes, '25, has been award-
ed the first prize of $500 in an essay
contest, conducted by the Pollak
Foundation of Economic Research of
Boston. The award was the result of
country wide competition among high
school students for the best essay on
a subject of economic importance.
The judges, Prof. Irving Fisher of
Yale university, Dean Denham of the
Harvard school of business adminis-
tration, and Wesley Mitchell, director
of the National Bureau of Economic
Research, declared the work far sp-
erior to any other submitted. A es
wrote the essay during the latter part
of his senior year at Detroit Northern
high school, his subject being "Judicial
Control of Industrial Warfare."
PLAN 'SUBMITTED
FOR O-OPSTORE
- |
Faculty Men Report After Gathering
Data and Considering Local
Conditions
PROJECT CALLS FOR $25,000
MINIMUM CAPITALIZATION
Plans for the proposed co-opera-
tive store were submitted yesterday
by the sub-committee of the Univer-
sity Forum appointed by Prof. A.. H.
Lloyd,. of the philosophy department,
who was chairman of an informal
group of interested University men.
This sub-committee, which was com-
posed of Prof. W. A. Paton, of the
economics department, chairman,
Prof. E. C. Goddard, of the Law school,
Prof. C. E. Love, of the mathematics
department, and Mr. M. ten Hoor of
the Engineering English faculty, was
appointed at a meeting Jan. 20, follow-
ing a report-made by an investigating
committee.
Two Membership Classes
The plan provides for a minimum
capitalization of $25,000 and offers
two kinds of memberships. Stock
membership which is preferred as to
a six per cent' dividend is available
to all persons connected with the
University. Deposit-membership is
open to all residents in the vicinity
and entitles the member to share in
the rebates. The plan is now open
to evidences of student interest which
can be shown by sending names in to
Professor Lloyd in the Graduate
school office.;
In commenting on the plan, Profes-
sor Lloyd says: "In general this plan
seems to have been wisely conceived.
Interested persons or organizations in
the faculty, the student body, or among
the resident alumni should now re-
port their names, preferably in writ-
ing. Names should be sent in not
later than May 3. Should sufficient
interest be shown, a meeting will be
called for purposes of organization
and any desired changes can be made
in the plan. But obviously the next
important step' in the matter is for
those really interested to report their
names one week from the publication
of the report or May 3."
Details Given
The plan is as follows:
1. Form of Organization. A corpora-'
tion duly organized under laws of the
state of Michigan.
2. Authorized capital $50,000, a
minimum of $25,000 to be subscribed
and paid in immediately upon organi-
zation. Shares $10 each. The right
to apportion in the case of an initial
over-subscription shall be reserved.
The stock shal be all of one grade
or preference.
(Continued on Page Three)
ACTION ON GAMES
EXPECTED TONIGHT
Spring games will likely be a topic
of discussion for the Student council
which meets tonight at the Union.
The plans for this annual e.vent be-
tween the Sophomore and Freshman

classes have been seriously delayed
due to the pressure of election busi-
ness, but the committee is at present
-putting all available 4time on the; ar-
rangements for the games. They will
be held May 12 and 13.
If all the Senior, canes have arriv-
ed, a definite date for "Cane" day will
be named by the council. Action on
this subject was deferred last week
because of the delay in arrival of the
engineering canes.
Most of the meeting will probably
be taken up with discussion of election
plans, as a great deal of the work
this year will be in the hands of the
council. Due to the almost entirely
new, fraud--proof system of voting
worked out for the University, much
work will be necessary in order to car-
ry the work to a successful conclu-
sion.
Watch for the "M's." Today Is "M"
Day.

AILES WINS $500
iN ESSAY CONT

i I

EST

REGISTRATION OF 3000 INDICAT[
RECORD ELECTION VOTE; NEW SY1
OF BALLOTING TO0 ELIMINATE

EXTEND

TIME LIMIT
FOR REGISTRATION'

NO VOTES' WILL BE
FINAL COUNT
RECORD]

.r

In order to prolvide for any
student who found it impossi-
ble to register at the regular
registration yesterday, the elec-
tion committee makes the follow-
ing provisions:
1. All Medics,,regardless of'
year, may register today, in the
first floor hall of- the Medical
building, or at the central reg-
istration booth in front of the.
Library.
C All others, regardless of school
or year, may register at the cen-
tral registration booth in front.
of the Library. In case of rain
the booth will be in the corridor
of the Library.
Each student will 1111 out a
card supplied at the registration I
place and must present with it
his University treasurer's receipt
or athletic book. Registration is |
I a condition precedent to the exer-
cise of the right to vote at the
C All-campus election which will
I be held May 2.
y
U.NION PLANS TOS RECEIVE
"MIHIGAN NIGHT" RADIO0
APPARATUS WILL BE INSTALLED
TO GiVE, PROGRAM IN'
READING ROOM
Students will hear the "Michigan
Night" radio program in' the reading
room of the Union next Saturday night
by virtue of plans which were com-
pleted yesterday for installing a large
radio set there to pick up the wire-
less messages. The program will be
broadcasted by the Detroit News sta-
tion, WWJ, at-8 o'clock eastern stand-
ard time, Saturday night, and will
continue for two hours. The program
embraces Michigan songs, speeches by
athletic captains, coaches, a regent'
and President Marion L. Burton, and
other' features.
l The radio set will be installed by
Walter R. Kreinheder, '23, and C. H.'
Katzenberger, '25, of the- K and K
Radio Supply company. It is probable
that an indoor antena will be used and
set up several days pfevious to Satur-
day fsor testing purposes. A large am-
plifier will be used to insure the
program will be distinctly heard by
a large crowd. A storm will be the.
only obstacle toa clear program. Elec-
trical discharges distort the sounds
over the radio phone, but anything'
short of a storm will not interfere with
the program.
asq uesf Assemble
Rgalia Tor Play
An unusual number of features are
said to be found in the Masques' pro-
duction of "Yellow Jacket" to be giv-
en Saturday night in Hill auditorium.
The setting designed by Prof. J. Ra-
leigh Nelson, director of the play, has

BOOTHS WILL BE OPE
UNTIL 3 O'CLOCK TOD
Close Nominations by Petition
ept for Union
Offices
Forecasting a large vote at the A
campus election which is to' be hi
next Tuesday more than 3,000 i
and women registered yesterday at
various booths stationed at vant
points about the campus. The re
tration was heaviest in the lit, d
engineering and law classes, with
number of medics registering. fall
greatly below the average due to
fact that the officers of some of
medic classes had failed to 'pro
booths, as per arrangement, for
registration by members of their
spective classes.
Booths Open Today
Students who were unable to rei
ter yesterday may do so today, it
announced by the election commi
since it is the desire of the comt
tee to have as large a number as p;
sible take part in the coming e]
tions. .There will be two 'booths
which registration may be made
day from 8:45 to 3 o'clock, one be
in the medical building, at wfiich
medical classes may register, and.
other being in front of 'the Libr
at which classes of all departments
the University may register.
"Each voter, to have his vote co
in the election, must first have re
tered," said Earl F. Boxel, '231, c
man of the election committee,' 3
terday. "We hope by this new s
tem which is being adopted to el
inate fraud and cheating at the el
tion."
Irregularities Eliminated
The new system of election, or rat
the improved method of voting, d
not eliminate the Australian or se
ballot. Each voter will make his
lections for the offices,. mark the 1
lot according to his choice, and ti
fill out the stub of the ballot with
formation similar to that reques
on the registration cards. The s
is torn from the ballot and is 1
sented to the election clerk, while
ballot proper will be deposited in
accustomed ballot box.
.France Gratefu
For American Aic
Says, Pro f. Cesti
Prof. Charles Cestre, head of
department of American literature
civilization at the University of Pa
delivered the first of a series of f
lectures which he will give while
Ann. Arbor, in Natural Science at
torium yesterday before a large a
ence.
Professor Cestre was introduced
President Marion L. Burton w,
touched upon the friendship that:
existed between France and the Uni
States. Professor Cestre replied
saying " that the gratitude that Fra
holds to the United States for her
and assistance in the World wa
infinite and that it is the hope of
Frenchmen that the friendship
tween- the two nations will be a last
one,
The subject of Professor Cesj;
lecture was "The Ideal of Reas
the speaker told of the contribut
to the welfare of France that Rabe
and Montaigne gave through tl
work which was the product of
soning in the 16th century.
"American virtues and princij

h David-
men out,
the Ypsi
is team's

R HE
0 0 0 0 1-1 2 6
1- 0 1 0 x-9 8 1
J. Rynearson and

ting of the
Dir literary
it 4 o'clock
n room 205,
;ers of vital
sidered, all
be present.
B. REA,
President.

Three petitions for nominations for
campus offices were accepted yester-
day by the election committee. R. .
Adams, Jr., '23, and Burton E. Dunlop,
'23, were nominated for president of
the Student Christian association and
John W. Kelly, '24L, for the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
The final day for nominations ex-
cept by petition, was Saturday. No
further nominations are expected un-.
less 'Vor Union offices..
Women's Athletic association nom-
inations for officers are as follows:
President, Grace Fry, '23, Elsa Ole-
sen, '23; vice-president, Julia , Coe,
'23, Marion Willis, '24; secretary,
Josephine.Connable, '23, Helen Miller,
'23; treasurer, Dorothy Bogan, '24Ed,
Dorothy Brown, '23; senior represen-
tative, Katherine Potter, Joyce Van-
Alstyne; junior representative, Doro-
thy Maitland, Lois Miller; sophomore
representative, Alma "Crouse, Marian-,
na Smalley.
ADDITIONAL EDITORS TO BE
NAMED BY BOARD SATURDAY
Appointments to the managing edi-
torship . of The Daily, the Gargoyle,
and the Students' Directory will be
made by the Board in Control of Stu-
dent Publications at a meeting at 1:30
o'clock Saturday afternoon. The ap.
pointments were delayed by the board
at its meeting last Saturday because
of the necessity for further consider-.
ation.
ma a .4,,, e e,,

been executed by 0. S. Davis c
troit, and a decorative treatme
the problem has been made in
forming Hill auditorium, a bu~
that has no theater equipment,'
greaw -Chinese 'theater.
The innumerable properties
hake been assembled from New
and San Francisco are posses-s
unusually interesting histories.
chair covers lent by Mrs.
Adams for one scene were ac
ripped from the chairs of the
palace in the looting of the
uprising.. Some of the banners
presents from the emperor of
years ago to the University as
en of his a dmiration for Pre
Angell.
The incidental music which
create the Chinese atmospher'e
play is followed from the scor
in the or iginal New York prodi
An orche stra composed partly c
.nese students and partly of st
in the School of Music is direc
Mrs. Francis Schneider. I

N, NOTICE

quest of the president'
hman literary class,
be a general meeting
men at 4 o'clock today
sity Hall. Louis T.
titioned for reinstate-
e class and it Is the
the council that Orr
d in view of his state-
s petitions. After re-
t in the class the
I consider such action
t to drop all proceed-

i
..
..
.,
..
..

Boxer which are embodied in aversi
were war, devotion to learning, public
China dom and liberty were copied fron
a tok- belais' formula," said Professor
sident tre. "Montaigne's contribution
through his essays which wer
'helps basis of a good deal of the wo
in the Bacon, Shakespeare, Jonson, an
e used erson."
uction.
of Chi-
ue DtIL

-

CAMPUS SOLICIT
NOTICE

ORS,

Owing

There will be a meeting .r all
men who are to act as solicitors
for the campus Tag Day for the
University of Michigan Fresh Air
camp at 3:30 o'clock this after-
noon in the second floor reading
room of the Union.

rr
t
C
'

staff mie
Professor Cook Returns From Montana the enti
Prof. C. W. Cook, of the economic will be
geology department, has returned to noon.
Ann Arbor after spending the past
10 days in Montana, where he has Don't
been investigating an oil project for treasure
a mining company. Professor Cook
resumed his clases tnday.. T.Tay

to the postponement
eting yesterday, the-me
re editorial staff and
held at 5 o'clock thi

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