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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the-postofiice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily otfice
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
) pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
Assistant Managing Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
City Editor ................................E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
Night Editors-
M. B. Stahl G. P. Overton
R. E. Adams Hughston MeBain
Paul Watzel Edward Lambrecht
F. H. McPike
Editorials.. T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach, E. R. Meiss
Supplement Editors...............T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
Sporting Editor ................................ George Reindel
Women's Editor ............................. Elizabeth Vickery
Humor Editor ...................................E R. Meiss
Assistants
Harry B. Grundy John Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
Wallace F. Elliott Sidney B. Coates 7ulian Mack
M. A. Klaver Lowell S. Kerr oward Donahue
Dorothy Whipple H. E. Howlett Arold F'leig
Marion Koch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ............. VERNON F. HILLERY
Advertising....................... F. M. Heath, A. J. Parker
Publicatin...........................Nathan W. Robertson
Accounts ...............................John J. Hamels, Jr.
Circulation............................... Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Burr L. Robbins Richard Cutting H. Willis Heidbreder
W. Cooley James Prentiss W. Kenneth Galbraith
L. Beaumont Parks Maurice Moule J. A. Dryer
Walter Scherer Martin Goldring Richard Heidemann
Edw. Murane Tyler Stevens T. H. Wolfe
Persons wishing to secure information 'concerning news for
any issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full
charge of all news to be printed that night.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1921
Night Editor-M. B. STAHL
HELP FIND THE SOLUTION
Interested observers of university life - men
who have seen freshman classes come and senior
classes go for a decade or so - are agreed that the
last three or four years have brought monumental
changes in the accepted 'and conventional life of
Michigan. Some say that the war with its conse-
quent broadening of vision, its changes in labor, and
its general antecedent unrest has been the cause -
others are wont to lay the blame in different direc-
tions. But the cause is rather unimportant just
now. The results are so much more manifest, so
much more pertinent and the search for the cause
has so far proved so very unsatisfactory, that to dis-
count results and look for a cause seems to be a
waste of so much good time and words.
We are all agreed that changes have come at
Michigan. We have felt them since, perhaps, the
fall of 1916 when the first unrest preceding the dec-
laration of war made itself felt. We are still at-
tempting to adjust ourselves to them, but the ques-
tion which presents itself so poignantly just now is
the growth of conditions newly-born of changed
laws of conduct.
Last February and March the student body of the
University was subjected to such violent criticisms
and made the object of such severe charges that it
was made apparent to the least interested observer
that somewhere, something was wrong. If the
charges were justifiable, then the fault lay with the
student body - if they were unjust, then they were
the result of short-sightedness and a lack of judg-
ment upon the part of the faculty. Investigations
were conducted - some of them proved fruitful -

others were mere semblances of inquiries, resulting
in many words and further accusations, but no in-
telligent steps were taken towards righting the
faults wherever they might lie until late in March
when the organization of the Student Advisory
Committee was taken up.
Here at last was an important movement towards
an intelligent coping with the problems of the cam-
pus. The committee, composed of four seniors and
two juniors, together with the managing editor of
The Daily, the president of the Union, and the pres-
ident of the Student council as ex-officio members,
was duly elected and has taken up the work of as-
sisting the Dean of Students, with whom it meets
every other Monday, and the Senate Committee on
Student Affairs, to get at the bottom of the ques-
tions which caused the cancellation of last year's
Junior Hop.
This fall the Student Advisory Committee has
taken up its work. It is attempting honestly and
intelligently to put the students and the faculty
upon a common ground of understanding and until
there exists this reciprocal feeling of trust and of
responsibility as well upon the parts of both bodies,
no semblance of harmony and team-work is possi-
ble. As long as there are students who insist that
the faculty is attempting to "put something over on
them", and as long as there are members of the fac-
ulty in responsible positions who are obsessed with
the idea that every infringement of student rules is
a willful and flagrant breach of trust, the achieve-
ment of any forward and intelligent advance will be
obviously impossible.
But the problems which the blanket accusation of
the student body early last semester called up -- if

indeed they are still problems - cannot be solved
by any single committee, whether it be composed of
members of the faculty or of students. There were
charges made which were unpleasant and which re-
flected to such an extent upon Michigan that every
student should feel it his duty to do his part towards
clearing himself of them. If they were untrue, then
we should make every effort to prove their fallacious
nature -- if they were true, then surely it should be
our duty to ourselves and to our University to so
change conditions that such an accusation can never
again be made.
It is through the Student Advisory Committee
that these changes can be effected. But that com-
mittee is powerless without the co-operation of
every member of the student body. This is a time
for intelligent and serious thought upon one of the
most vital situations which the University has ever
faced. The Daily through its columns affords every
man the opportunity of expressing himself openly
without fear of having his remarks taken as a per-
sonal affront by anyone. If conditions are in need
of change, then let us change them, but without the
intelligent expression of opinon by members of the
student body, the impossibility of concerted action
is obvious. This is your problem. Will you help
your University to face it?
A CORRECTION
It was stated in Tuesday's Daily that under a city
taxicab ordinance drivers were allowed to charge 35
cents between the hours of 5 o'clock in the morning
and ii o'clock in the evening, while 50 cents could
be charged from I I o'clock in the evening until 5
o'clock in the morning. .It was said also that the
sum of 15 _cents could be charged for each stop
made between the starting point and the destina-
tion.
These figures were incorrect. According to the
regulation drivers may charge 50 cents at all times
for the first passenger,35 cents for each additional
passenger, and 25 cents for each stop made. Party
and theater rates are 50 cents straight.
Austrian paper money is so worthless that brew-
ing companies find it cheaper tc' use it for labels
than to have them printed. All that is necessary
now to knock it out for good is for prohibition to
hit Europe.
The government is thinking of leasing ships at $
a year to keep them from standing idle. At that
rate we could afford a few for use in Ann Arbor on
a rainy day.
Now tfhat Charlie Chaplin has found a pedigree
it is proved conclusively that even the members of
the best families can become good comedians.
While they are grafting monkey glands so near
here as Detroit they might consider West Hall as
a subject.
How are those class elections coning along?
The Telescope

r

A complete line. of textbooks and supplies

for all colleges at both stores

GRAHAM
Both ends of the diagonal A'alk

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.o5 a.
"M., 7:05 a. m., 8:10 a. m. and hourly to 9:io
p. in.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. mn. and every two hours to
9:48 p. in.
Local Cars East Bound-5:55 a.m., 7:00 a.
m. and every two hours, to 9:oo p. in., tit:oo
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-tit:40 p. M., 12.25
A. in., 1:15 a. Mn.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:5o a. M., 2:40 p.
in.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 1041 a. m~. 12:48, 2:48, 4:48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:48
P. ".

Ii

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TAXI

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A Ddge Car
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enough said

1921

OCTOBER

2 s 4 5
9 10 11 12
16 17 18 19
1 2 3& SO

6
13
20
27

14
21
s

1921
1
81
15
22
299

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NOTICE TO XEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new.
FAORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
Thmbs

SC E CREA M
Feeds Body and Mind -
It is a decided helpi
making your work at the
University a success.

IV 51 - IV

CLEANLINESS-

VA IS

Do you remember how particular. your mother used to be
to keep you clean when you were a youngster? That is just
how particular we are about your butter, cheese, milk, and
cream.

THE ANN ARBOR DAIRY CO.

AUTO LIVERY
416 S. MAIN ST.
PHONE 583-J
With or Without Driver

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Telephone 423

11

!'

The True Hero
The good ship had hit an iceberg
And was sinking
Speedily.
"Fifty dollars," shouted a frantic
As he grabbed up the one- remain
Life preserver
And jumped into the sea. "Fifty
To the man who saves
My wife."

man
ping

A student whose noon
hour is much too short

dollars

One of the lit frosh wrote out his own excuses for
absence from class, for as he said, who could know
better when he was sick.
Quoth Eppie Taf:
Here lies Gabriel
For him we mourn,
He drove down State street
Without his horn.
-- Urman.

"The most convenient place
for me to eat is the Arcade

Cafeteria.

liest food tool!"

Our Latest Song Entitled:
Taxi-driver Storms Are Always Fare

"To the
Weather."

I am a bachelor, lone and free,
I have no troubles or cares ;
While married couples, as you'll agree,
Are apt to give themselves heirs.
-Bon Ami.
Fate
Helen Happ, in virtue reared,
Sat on her sweetheart's lap,
But suddenly her pa appeared
And caused a sad Miss Happ.
-Dormitory Dot.
Want to see something great?
Sure thing.
Rub a lemon on a sieve.
A Cigarette Story
When Fatima slipped
One day and fell,
She squealed out, "o Mar",
And came running Pall Mall.
Famous Closing Lines
"Using the touch system," smiled the ex-typist
as she asked her husband for a ten. ERM.

It's upstairs in
Nickels' Arcade

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"When You Buy, Buy Quality"

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-and they cost no more

WAGNER & COMPANY
For Men Since 1848
STATE STREET A T LIBERTY

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