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April 07, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

f the super-university

ds

'D PRSS
atitled to the ase er
to it or not otherwise
nbasked treil.
quard Street,

w.q

414.

sentiments4

d4

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDITOR ........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
................................Joseph A. Bernstein
................E. P. joyJr.
.B..................... ......... Young
dams . G. P. Overton
P. Dawson M. B. Stahl
trd Ianbrecht Paul Watzel
.. McPike
ird Chairman ...................L. Armstrong Kern

'shdorfer

E. R. Mes

in many places the first opportunity for systematic
planning, and our own University bids fair to be-
come a leader, a model, in this respect. Hence the
timeliness of the question whether in the public
judgmert Michigan's architecture should embody,
so far as it may be possible, the traditional elements
of classical beauty and lofty reverence, or should
step forth boldly in exemplification of the modern-
ist view, that economy and efficiency really attest
the greater intelligence and wisdom - that simplic-
ity and utility actually express the purer beauty
and the truer devotion.
The University of Michigan plan has been under
consideration for several years. The University
Regents and administrative officials are highly com-
petent to weigh this sentimental and practical ques-
tion. They have had the advice of city planning en-
gineers and consulting architects of established
reputation. Thus there is every reason to feel con-
fidence that the decisions resulting from their com-
bined labors will be wise and commendable. Yet a
persistent feeling of concern exists, based in large
part upon comparisons of recently erected struct-
ures on the campus, lest the greater Michigan that
is in the making may prove disappointing in its ex-
ternal architectural aspects.
Searching for a subjective cause for this per-
sistent feeling, it seems to be not so much one of
distrust toward the responsible experts who have
the affair in hand, as it is a deep-seated affection
for Alma Mater, which takes the form of anxious-
ness only in the absence of fuller knowledge of the
tremendous' plans that are under' way. Students
and alumni already have been generously informed-
regarding the several structural units, their loca-
tion and .estimated costs; but they are without
knowledge of the external architectural features in'
which they feel such deep sentimental interest.
The Daily would like to see architects' sketches
and basic plans of the first buildings units pub-
lished, at the earliest date possible, for the general
information of students, alumni, and interested cit-
izens. Probably the designs would meet with en-
thusiastic 'approval; they certainly would satisfy a
desire for information that is deeper than mere
curiosity.
But, more than that, apparently a very useful pur-
pose would be served if such publicity should'furn-
ish the basis for registering definite, positive senti-
ment regarding the two contending theories of arch-
itectural design, or the most appropriate point of
compromise between them, comparative construc-
tion costs being kept in view.
Adminisgration officials and architects alike
should welcome such popular expression, together
with such useful suggestions as might possibly be
elicited, as an aid to their own judgment in design-
ing the remainder of the proposed buildings.

(BOTH STORES)
I

At, Greatly Reduced
AT
GRAHIAM

DETROIT UITED LINES
An. Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars - 6:o
a. M., 7:so a. m., 8:eo a. tn., :oe a. m, and
hourly to g :s5 p. m.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Asnn
Arbor), P:47 a. M. and every two hours to
al Cars ast Bound-5:5g a.m., 7:o a.
a. and every two hours to :.o p. m.. 1.00
p. w To Ypsilanti only-ii:.o p. aL., za:zs
i. m.,''-.,5 a. :.
To Saiehane-at Ypsia-t.
Local Cars West Bound-7:90 a. sa., 2:40
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
S:47. 10:7. a. m., 1a:47, 2.47, 4:47.
To Jackson and Lansing-LiIted: 8:47

TAT
c0c

zine Editor...............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
itor................................George E. Sloan
..................................Sidney B. Coates
tt. . .. . .. .. . . . .........George Reindel'
tor ...............................Elizabeth Vickery
r.......................................E. R. M ein
Assistants
man Dorothy G. Gelta Robert M. Loeb
trop H. B.Grundy 3. IB. Mack
scoe Winona A. Hibbard at hrine Montgomery
erHarry D. Hoey R. C. Moriarty
a Agnes Holmquist J. F. Pontius
C H. E. Howlett Lillian Scher
lark Marion Kerr R.B. Tarr
oughlil M. A. Kiaver Virginia Tryon
%hue Marion Koch
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960

ANNUAL BOOK

L;

1922
S M

APRIL
T W T

2
9
16
23

a
10
17
- 24,

4
11
18
25

5
12
19
26

6
18
20
27

1922
F S
1
7 8
14 15
21 22
28 29

TUT
A Place to
Nowhe
Nowhere is
TUTTLE'S L
Maynar(
REMOVE TI
Step into either of our
Safety Deposit
You will feel at ease kn
safely deposited in you
those ma
THE COST
FARMERS & ME
101-105 South Main Street.

:'i
k

HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
mings they are as good as new. High
class work only.'
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

.......VERNON F. II

vertising..............:......................Albert J.
vertising...............................John J. Ha
blication...........................Nathan W. Rc
,counts .......... .......................'Walter R.
culation.............. .... ......Herold C
Assistants

David Park
t Parksa A. Dryer
ie J .H. ole
iss Paul Blum
ring Stanley Monroe
william Graulich

D. C. Maltby
Harvey Reed
George Rocke
Z. D. Ammantri
Edward Conli
Lrrence a

LLERY
Parker
mel, Jr.
otertson
Scherer
. Hunt
ood
out
n
rot

calkins-Fletcher Drug co.
invitc the inspection of
ayp !n*4e
TREBO PRICE
LPEDON R'9S
P1IPVE

FRIDAY, APRIL 7, 1922
Night Editor-R. E. ADAMS, JR.
Assstant-R. N. Byers
Proofreader.-M. E. Fead
TALK 'EM UP

Z

I

tem
I!
'e

Ivory
stopper
in the st
stops al
mopistu r

OSWA I

Cleaning

..

en the student body takes its temporary leave
campus for {he spring Vacation, it will also
rith it a dity - in fact a three-fold duty -
sponsibility' to Michigan. Those who live in
ctions to be visited by the Varsity baseball
ind the Varsity band, will have the pleasant
f seeing that the stands and auditoriums are
1 with loyal alumni and friends of Michigan.
the most important project is the completion
Union swimming pool. Toward the realiza,
f this goal every student who leaves for his
today can add his share by "talking it up"
alumni. Those who have graduated from
niversity, whether two or twenty years ago,
11 vitally interested in the affairs of the cam-
ad are always willing to lend their ,aid when
ed arises. The "talking up" is the part of the
t solicitor; the listening and check-signing
action of the alumni.
e, then, are three opportunities to serve'
an; by "'talking up" the Union pool cam-
the baseball games, and the band concerts.
tter will be dead-easy, but the first named will
e a more signal victory. Every student
set himself the task of getting as many pool
iptions as possible, so that when school re-
(drat the thought!) the drive will have gone

t<'
k
G. ...
[, '
r-
l +'

Michigan, Wisco'nsin, and Illinois are all taking
southern trips this vacation. Since in several cases
they play the same teams it may happen that the
baseball championship will be settled in the South.
Keep your eye on the team.
ie Telescope

Ii
A Reliable Jeweler
CH APMAN
113 South Main
I E S S AY:
THE ART ARiROUND US

Agents for the UnitedStates and Canada
GROSVENOR NICHOLAS & CO., Inc.
12 East 48th Street New York City

'

Arrow

.1

Ho me
Although some may he stayin'
In town here, obeyin'
The words of a parental tome,
The most of us,'packed up,
With text books all stacked up,
Just figure on headin' for home.

Qdll r TncPv

to vacate" - and also the

THE CLOISTER OR THE MART?
Colleges and universities, formerly attended by
the wealthy or talented few, in modern times have
become laboratories and training shops for many
practical professions, and are attended by numer-
ous average students. These changing conditions
have naturally raised the question whether such in-
stitutions should be kept secluded and architectur-
ally- distinctive, as of old, or should aim to simulate
thoroughly the conditions of business life into
which students must plunge upon graduation.
Modern opinion unquestionably favors the lat-
ter, the obvious course, with respect to curricula and
laboratory conditions; but as to architectural ex-
ternals, much sentiment persists for preserving, as
fully as possible, the elements of seclusiveness and
refined beauty which are traditional of the past.
The subject is of acute interest to all Michigan men
and women at the present juncture, in view of
Michigan's immense building program, now getting,
under way.
In America education has grown apace with the
country. College buildings have been erected to
meet urgent needs, often without the financial
means to secure the' most desirable results archi-'
tecturally, even if other circumstances might have
permitted the adoption of a definite and continuous'
architectural policy. As a result universities have
grown up in a hit-or-miss fashion, and it is rare to
find, in the newer West at least, an institution whose
architectural features are not 0E this motled, inco-

For though seekin' out knowledege
We came here to college,
And they've stuck some big words in cur
dome,
Still there's one of four letters
Which remains without betters,
And that's why we're headin' for home.
Let's Be Generous
Another headline in The Daily:
"WHIMSIES OUT AFTER VACATION"
For the love O' Mike let them have it.
GRRR '7!.
Remember back in the Victorian age when women
used to faint at the slightest provocation, when they
would keel over whenever picture show rates were
increased, and wither dead away at the sight of an
unbuckled galosh?
Well, times have changed since then, and girls
have hardened themselves. Ttake our Michigan
women, for instance. .They can actually look upon
a genuine "status quo" without shrinking, and even
went so far as to p'etition to be allowed to attend
the boxing bouts at the Mimes -theater. Imagine
such unadulterated brutality.
Surely a halt should be called to these practices
before it is too late, or soon the campus males will
be invited to witness a boxing match between Bat-
tling Virginia and Ruthless Ruth for the cham-
pionship of the Women's League, the award to be
one set of geranium enameled perfume containers.
Oh Tempora, etc!
Why It Fizzled?
It is rumored that the Parade of the "Girls Who
Have.Never Been Kissed," which is an annual fes-
tivity in Parisian life, was called off this year be-
cause one of the girls was sick and the other one
refused to march alone.
Famous Closing Lines
"Generally speaking," said the economics pro-
fessor when asked how his wife was.
RRM.

9, (I JJaJlny in.
We are offered the chance of so
many cducations in one that we have
A
developed the habit of shutting out of
co"sciousness everything that is not
fcrcibly crammed in by ouir profes-
'sors. The pictures that hang on the
walls of our classrooms, in our semin-
ars, and in the corridors of univer-
siiy buildings constitute.in themselves 8 14 So. S
a little section of culture that most of
us are oblivious to. They are not 1
there simply because someone thought
they would make good furniture for -
buildings designed primarily for- the
acquisition of knowledge; they are
there to be appreciated. . . . Take a
moment off from th~e feverish dashes A
between committee meetings and
study our pictures; they are really
quite worth while.

! : l 'VAC

CA

,11

GET OUT!

Is a good time
CLEANED, P1

State

(Purdue Exponent)
sedative? Then get out doors. Orig-
inally, man was part and parcel of
nature. Today, from the urge of civ-
Ilization_ he has developed many
weaknesses. of the body and spirit1
that often show themselves- under the
continued strain of his highly special-
ize, life within present day society.
There is one sure relief from over-
civilization. It is the outdoors.
Many men from every walk of life
find relaxation, recreation, and' new
enthusiasm for life in frequent asso-
ciation with the great outdoors.
There is a bigness and grandeur iri
the hills and rivers that gives him
confidence and courage to carry on
his work. There is a 'gentleness about
it all to soothe a weary brain and re-
juvenate tired muscles.
Warmer days are before us when
the weather shall clear and all nature
shall rejoice in the spring. Months
of winter work and too close confine-
ment are behind us. Bodies are lazy I
tired with the strain, and dispositions
are apt to be "crabbed." We owe it
to ourselves to sail the canoe up the
river, go fishing, hiking, or join the
bird club, in fact indulge in any or all
of our outdoor hobbies.
Easter. Birthday, and Greeting cards.
0 n) Afn,iI 17 Nickral's Ainpad AA.

Also Portiers, etc.
Look them over, you w
your best when school

Swissillized Garments

Phone
2508

anr~ ie

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