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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1922 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

IN MINES

CAPACITY
LDOM

There are 150,000 men surplus men
employed in the coal industry at the
present time, according to Prof. Isador
Lubin ,of the economics department.
Not only is there a surplus of men,
but there are more mines than neces-,
sary to supply the country with coal
under normal conditions.
The actual productive capacity of
our coal mines is 640 million tons an-
nually, while the largest output ever
reached was 580 million tons. This
was produced in 1918.
Want Present Wages
The miners are asking a continu-
ance of theipresent wage scale, which
is $7 ts $7.50 per day on the average.
They are asking for a six-hour day,'
fve days a week. This will restrict
output, they hope, so that there will
be steadier employment in the field.
No permanent injury can be done
by granting the miners' demands re-
garding working hours, according to
Professor Lubin. He stated that the
average work done by coal miners
during the year 1919, which was a
good year in the coal industry, wax
30 hoursper week. They are trying
to stabilize their working conditions,
which at present are very irregular.
Depends on Non-union Men
"The, success of the strike will de-
pend on whether or not the non-union
miners will go out," said Professor'
Lubin. He added that it would be
difficult to predict which side will Win
the strike, as there is a lack of defi-
nite information as to the actual
number of men involved.
BURTO PLAS SPEECHES
President to Talk in Four Cities Dur-
ing Easter Vacation'
President Marion L. Burton will
fill four speaking engagements be-
tween now and the commencement of
school after ,the spring recess. He
was in Detroit yesterday to address
the Michigan State Dental society.
Friday he will go to Chicago, where
he will address the Michigan alumni,
and will speak at Oak Park, on Sat-
urday. April 13 he wil~l address the
Kentucky Educational association at
Louisville, and on April 18, the day
school opens, he will attend a meet-'
in gof the Grand Rapids alumni.

Glee Club Sings
At Ypsi Tonight
The Varsity Glee club will make
its first appearance outside Ann
Ann Arbor when it gives its concert
at 8 o'clock tonight in Pease audi-
torium, Ypsilanti, as guest of the
Michigan State Normal college.
The program will be much the same
as that offered here last week, al-
though a few changes have been made
in the order and presentation of num-
bers. Those taking part at Ypsilanti
will include the Glee club, the Man-
dolin club, the Warsity quartet, Mid-
night Sons quartette, banjo quin-
tette and Tang and Tavares in Ha-
waiian numbers.,
Marriage of Students Announced
Mr. and Mrs. L. 0. Cushing an-
ter, Loyce Cushing, '24, to Ben H. Lee,
tr, Loyce C.ushing, '24, to Ben H. Lee,
'24. Mrs. Lee was a member of the
Alpha Xi Delta sorority.
Try a Daily Want Ad. Tt pays.-Adv.

Know Your Alumni
(By Courtesy of Chimes)
Do You Know-
That Fred C, Kelly conducted a
semi-humorous column in the Cleve-
land Plain Dealer for five years, that
beginning with 1910 he wrote a daily
column of short character sketches
for several years entitled ¥"Statesmen,
Real and Near," which appeared in
about thirty newspapers about the
country, that he was a special agent
of the Department of Justice engaged
in running down pro-German plots
against the government during the
war, that he has written many con-
tributions for prominent magazines
and is the author of "Human Nature
in B Business," published in 1919, and
finally and most important, that he
was a student at Michigan and has
preserved his contact with the stu-
dent body here by writing an article
for Chimes which was printed a few
"months ago'?
I"RIDER for PENS."-Adv.

THE MAY FESTIVA:

A FEAST OF GOOD MUSIC

I-
'mm

Hill Auditorium,

- - May17,18,19, 2

Six

Concerts

I.

STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE
1 111 South University Ave.

READ THIS

I
- - - - - - - - - - twww w No 0-g-NIM-m-lbA WWO

- ~ ~-- -

Engineers' and Architects' Materials
Stationery Fountain Pens Loose Leaf Books
Cameras and Supplies

Candies

Laundry Agency

Tobaccos

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4

APRIL'
ivtN MON ry@ E D~E

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2 3
9 t4
16 17
23 24
30

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1922
6 7 8 .
13 14'1W
20 21 22
27 28 29

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A large number of the greatest artists from the Metropolitan Opera
Company, the Chicago Opera Association and other musical celebrities will
participate in brilliant programs interspersed with selections by the Chicago
Symphony Orchestra, The University Choral Union, and a Children's Cho-
rus. "LA VITA NUOVA" (The New Life) by Wolf-Ferrari, words
by the great Dante, whose six-hundredth anniversary it commemorates, will
be sung. Wagner's "TANNHAUSER" will be offered in English, Fred-
erick Stock's "RHAPSODY" will be given, and among other numbers the
children will sing Busch's "SONG OF SPRING."
The list of soloists includes: Frieda Hempel and Florence Easton, so-
pranos; Mario Chamlee, Tenor; and Carl Schlegel and Reinald Werren-
rath, baritones, are among the greatest stars of the Metropolitan Opera Com-
pany. Cyrena VanGordon, contralto, and Riccardo Martin, tenor of the
Chicago Opera Association; Adele Parkhurst, soprano; Kathryn Moisle, con-
tralto; Rollin Pease, bass, are among America's greatest concert stars. Wil-
liam Bachaus, one of the leading piano virtuosos. Frederick Stock will con-
duct all of the concerts except the NEW LIFE which will be conducted by
Acting Conductor, Earl V. Moore, and the Children's Chorus, which will
be under the baton of George Oscar Bowen.

l1

I

House Cleaning Time means
you will desire new Rugs"
We make them . from your
old Rugs.
We also clean, scour and size
your old ones.

I

I..
- ,.
_...

I

0

ANN ARBOR FLUFF RUG & CLEANING CO
1003 Broadway Phone 1946

A limited number of course tickets are still available at $7.00, $6.00,
$5.00, $4.50 each (if Pre-Festival coupon is returned deduct $3.00) at the

*

, .

office of the University School of Music.

CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary.

X-

Y. " ' "'- - - 1

LAST TIMES TONIGHT

What Is A Cerebellicose?

ADDED

The Nearest
to Being a
100 per cent
Program for
Everybody
that we ever

LAST TIMES TONIGHT
MarshallNe4
* presents 11
Penrh

LA It's up
to::oa
L\really

"BIRTHDAY PESTS
AND JUNGLE GUESTS"

yo

send Kid Care Battling
Boredom down and out
or the count

It's a Riot of, Fun

had.

ARCADE ORCHESTRA

Bay
TOMORROW AND SATU
ty

as you
never I

A Musical Treat

The drama of a
wife who was!
a model of beau

before.
DAY
and a wi
who was
statue of

r
a1t
ti
C

TOMORROW and SATURDAY
The World at Her Feet
And this flapper tried to keep them there.
A drama of divided devotion, of Nita
Gordon's fight to win back her own
and the world's approval

J

METO
CLASSIC

I

We believe you will enjoy
production from its various
gles. The story is by
JUNE MATHIS

this
an-

~7keGOEN GVT

A

who wrote the screen version of
"THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE
APOCAYPSE"

I

COMING
"FLASHES OF ACTION"

ADDED

AND
"BACK.

P AY "

Find

COMING SUNDAY

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