100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 01, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
orning except Monday during the University
Control of Student Publications.
OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
irse is exclusively entitled t the usr for
we dispatche credited to it or not otbi-ise
and the local news published tkerei.s
tote at Ann Arbor Michigan, as seceA
arrier or sail, $3.56.
iw Press Building, Maynard. Street.

d 300 words, if signed, the signa-
print, but as an evidence of faith,
disheA in The Daily at the discre.
iled to The Daily office. Unsigned
.onsideration. No manuscript will

sarily end

sentiments expressed

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
SAGING EDITOR...........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
* Editor...........................Joseph A. Bernstein
ditor............................-E, P. Lovejoy, Jr.
staKt City Editor................................... B. Young
-Adams .'G. P. Overton
R.1)1; YADamsonM. B. Stahl
dard LamechtPul Wa z
Prank McPike
orial Board Chairman....,......-......'L. Armatrong Kern
ial Board-;
Loo ,Hershdorfer E. R. Meiss
C. S. Andrews
lay Magazine E4itor.............Thornton W. Sargent, Jr.
4ange Editor ...........................George . Sloan
Ic Editor.................-.....Sidney B. Coates
tg ±utl .......... . ........ .......George Rendel
es dtor......................... lizabeth Vickery
or Editor.... . ....... ....... . .E. R. Meiss
Assistants
[ *rice Berman Dorothy G:,Geltz Robert M.:Lo
ecu R. Betrou H. B. rnd 3.JB. Mack
a D Briscoe Winona A. Hbard Kathrine Montgomery
9'. . Butler Barry D. Hoy R C. Moriarty
CN Byra AgnesHolmquist . F. Pontius
D. Clrk H._4. Howlett Lillian Scher
arryC. Clark Marion Kerr R. B. Tarr
.elyn 3* Cughin M A. Kaver Virginia Tryon
It; A. Donahue aroun Koch
BUSIMESS STAFF
Telephone 960
INESS MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
g......... . Albert J. Parker
rtisig.........................John J. Hamel Jr.
tcaionp .,. .. ..Nathan' W. Robertson
uts.,..............................Walter K. Scherer
ation...,...........................Herold C. Hunt
V. Cooley . David Park D. C. Maltby
E ieaumont Parks . A. Drer Harvey Reedk d
ameorg RcwoPrentiss Paul Blum B. D. Armantrout
art dring Stanley Monroe Edward Conlin
William Graulich Lawrence Favrot
SATURDAY, APRIL 1, 1922
Night Editor-G. P. OVERTON
Assistants-R: M. Loeb
R. B. Tarr#
THE COMMITTEE EXPLAINS
your main reasons of the Committee on Dramatic
anizations for recommending recently to the
late Committee and Student Affairs that the Jun-
Girls' play, "Scepters and Serenades", should
be opened to the pulic as requested in a recent.
tion ,submitted by the women of the cast and
rus, were published in yesterday's Daily. Al-
ugh the four reasons very apparently' had been
rked out carefullybefore being subhitted to the
nmittee on Student Affairs, ,The Daily does not
I that they are at all adequate, or that they jus-
the committee's action.
he reasons given were in part as follows:
I. "This issue should not .be clouded by the
stion of raising. funds for the league building.
e principle involved is too important to be sub-
inated to any extraneous consideration, however
ghty." The committee fails to state the "prin-
Le involved", but it is to be assumed that it act-
ly is "too important to be subordinated", etc. It
st be a weighty principle indeed. Better far to
the women sell shoe laces, candy, hair nets, and
atnot, on the campus, to shine shoes, and solicit"
rnnae for subscriptions, seeking thereby to se-
e every pittance available to swell their building
d, than, by making it possible for them to earn
eral hundred or a thousand dollars at a single
e, -to subordinate such an all-important principle
this - a principle which, however, as yet re-
ins undefined.
. "In making this decision we have no desire to
rart the will of students in the matter of college
Iition that is primarily their own concern. We
eve, however, that our attitude truly expresses
sober second thought of both men and women."
is is not a reason for the action of the commit-
rather, it is but an attempted justification of
members' attitude. That leaves but three rea-
s. Meanwhile, The Daily, as opposed to the
imittee, does not believe that this attitude ex-
sses the feeling of any but a small portion of the
n and women on the campus.

". A change from the present type
audience, . . . to one o'f a less homogeneous
t," says the committee, "would inevitably tend
nodify the standards which years of growth have
ated." Again The Daily -would call attention to
previous mention of Professor Brumm's state-.
its that he had no intention, so long as he was
cting the Junior Girls' play, of permitting a
ering of its standards. 7 he Daily would repeat
e more the fact that, although the play has been
tten and produced for years with the expecta-
each time that it was to be opened to the pub-
its character and standards have been steadily
ed rather than lowered.
"The most important aspect of this question
is bearing upon the very texture of the social

life of the student body and we believe that one of
the most distinctive features of undergraduate life
at Michigan is the independent, self-contained ex-
istence which the women of the University have al-
ways been able to maintain." The Daily fails to
understand how opening the Junior Girls' play to
the general public for several performances, at the,
same time retaining the custom of having the first
night performance for senior girls, would take away
the independent attitude of the women, any more
than opening the Union opera has affected the at-
titude of the men. So long as the play is written
and staged by women, with girls composing the en-
tire cast and chorus, it can never be called anything
but a woman's activity and function. The presence
of men in the audience - after the first night - is
not going to affect its standing as such.
The dramatic cpmmittee goes on with: "Just as
the men have jealously guarded certain of their
interests from feminine encroachment, so the
women have preserved a dignified aloofness in re-
gard to cherished activities of their own." As a
matter of fact, the men "have jealously guarded"
only one "of their interests from feminine en-
croachment" - the Tap room. Yet the women's
building undoubtedly will have at least one similar
retreat, which women students, like the men, can
call their own.
Further: "All these traditions and customs which'
have established and strengthened this quality of
our student life" - "a dignified aloofness" presum,
ably - "and its attendant atmosphere should be
faithfully and vigorously observed. Their gradual
weakening or deliberate abolition would in time re-
sult in a deterioration to the conditions 'which exist.
in certain institutions where neither the men nor
the women have any real college life of their own".
But President Marion L. Burton does not want the
two groups to stand aloof, though, at the same time,
he does not ask that they necessarily should be de-
pendent upon one another. His attitude is rather
clearly indicated by his speeches, in which he reg-
ularly speaks of men and women together, not as
distinctly separate.
STRETCH THOSE MUSCLES
Not so long ago,.a call went out asking men who
were interested in special athletic work to file their
names at the office of Waterman gymnasium. So
far, only a few have taken advantage of the ,op-
portunity. Although the active work will not begin
until after the spring holidays, it is not too early to
sign up for the class now. Early registration will
greatly facilitate the arrangement of the work to be
undertaken. It seems only fair to those who are
in charge that all applications be in the proper
hands as far ahead of time as is possible.
If skepticism is the reason for the scarcity of
names on file, careful consideration of the advan-
tages of such work will dispel any doubt. Aside
from the ordinary benefits and pleasures of gym-
nasium work, there is much else to recommend the
project. Plans have been made to take up ad-
vanced work, and, toward the end of the season, to
a arrange several competitiverevents. At a slight ex-
penditure 'of effort, much real enjoyment could be
bought.
It seems as if the old bugaboo of the student, in-
ertia, is again at work. But the classes are 'still
being held open for more applicants.

At Greatly Reduced Prices
AT
GRAHAM'S
ANNUAL BOOK SALE
(BOT H STOR ES).

""""""

BOOKS, STATIONERY, BRIEF CASES, FELT
LEATHER GOODS, BOSTON FACS, MEMORY

DETROIT UNITED LINES
An Arbor and Jackson
TIE TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limitd and Express Cars-- 4:eo
a. M., T:so a. an., a:so a. m., :.o a. m. and
houriyyto :oS p. ax.
JacksonExpresa Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 1:47 a. v and every two hours to
tocilCan last Bound-: s ...: . a.
m,. and svery two hours to #:oo p. i., uz.so ~
..AL, To rpsaats only-li :48 p.:urn.., a:sq
s m. x$ . Ia.t .
To Sline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West' auad--7.so a. mn., a :pu
is. in.
To Jackson and £alamexoo--Lnnted cars:
> '". 10:47, . A. ., 13:47, 2.47, 4:47.
To Jacksoa andLansing. -imited: S:47
-' in

Place to bring your, friends
Nowhere is the food better
Nowhere is the service more prompt
TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
Maynard Street

"

I

.1

1922
S

APRIL
1 T W

2
9
16
23
3o

3
10
17
24

-4
11
18
25

6
12
19
26

1922
T F S
1
6 7 8
13 14 15
20' 21 22'
27 28 29

a

HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced prices.
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
mngs they are asgood as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
EW II s v

REMOVE THE DANGER
Step into either of our offices and look over .our
Safety Deposit Vault Equipment
You will feel at ease knowing your valuables are f
safely deposited in your individual box behind
those massive doors
THE COST IS NQMINAL
FARMERS & MECHANICS BANK
101-106 South Main Street. $30 South State S
(Nickels Arcad

If'

I

TELEPHONE 214 1.1

.

I I

Tweed Top Coats
Cravenettes and Rain Coats
All kinds, at lowest prices. See them and be convinced.
Breeches and Knicker Suits
Ladies and Men's
Largest assortment, in all materials, also Corduroy, Moleskin and
Sport Suits.
Munson Army, Officers Dress and Hiking SHOES, Leather and
Wrap Puttees, High-Top and Moccasin Pack Shoes for ladies and
men.
0. D. Woo Army Shirts, Khaki and Pongee Dress Shirts, Golf
Hose, Tom ye Knit Coats, Sweaters, Underwear, Caps, etc.

Prof. David Friday, formerly of the economics
department, -will take up his duties as president of
M. A. C. today. We wonder whether this is a
joke on M. A. C. or Professor Friday.

,

Vie T elescope
Oh, Terribulum
The funniest thing happened yesterday,.-
A tattoo artist came to' town;
He hung out a sign on Liberty street
And started to work tattooing students.
He was finished with more than thirty of them
(And here comes the mean part)
When the University had him arrested.
Think of it ! Arrested!
And guesswhy they did it.
It was' just another foolish argument.
They' said that this tattooer -
(And by the way remember this is April i)
That he was harming the University
Because he had designs
On so many of the students.
(Don't forget to attend the indignation meeting.)
Bad Policy
At the Interscholastic tournament last Thursday
night the following two cheers were given:
Yea Western!
Yea Union!
Although much enthusiasm was shown in the giv-
ing of these cheers, some individuals accuse the
rooters of unjust partiality. It seems that while
they were at' it they could have given a
Fight 'em Postal Telegraph !
Count 'Em
Daily Cub 1: Say, no wonder these Ensian fel-
lows come early and leave late. They've got six
wonderful inducements to do it.
Daily Cub 2: What are they?.
Daily Cub 1: I don't know their names, yet.
Famous Closing Lines
"You can't get me to bite on that," slyly remarked
Mr. Wise Stude as the professional joker offered
him a piece of rubber candy.
ERM.

SurpluSuppliesStore, 213 N. 4th Ave.
"I: pays to walk a felp blocks"

-
UNV
Y U r
anwC
rwFor
Woe
s
w
w
s
w
O ar
_ ndse
w IIII~I~~~~~iIUiliiiiiiiiiiiI

IRSITY WOMEN

cordially invited to come in
e=or try on, Fashions .latest-
oxfords.

NE & HERTLE--,r-R.

FOOTWEAR

For
Men

335 South Main Street

ai

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan