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March 19, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-19

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0II. No. 123

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 19, 1922

PRICPN

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OIS

WINS

CONFERENCE

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s

AER SESSION
HINS, COURSE
O HII
[A INCLUDE IMPORTANT
3LEMS OF COACHING
AND TEACHING
'O DIRECT WORK;
COMPETENT STAFF
k Will Conduct Classes in
k; Mather, Fisher Also
to Teach

Particulars 'concerning the courses
athletic coaching and administra-
n to be given during the Summer
sion in the School of Education
re announced yesterday.
[he classes ha've been arranged pri-
trily for instructors already engag-
in' teaching or coaching during the
gular school year, but are open to
yone wishing to supplement the
eparation received in colleges and
ofessional schools. The courses take
all of the important problems of
aching and are intended to more
npetently fit men to take charge of
letics and gymnastics in schools
d colleges throughout the country.
Yost to Be Director
Fielding H. Yost, director of inter-,
legiate athletics and head coach in
Atball, will be director of the school
d instructor in football. Coach Yost
11 be aided in his work by Elton E.
.eman, '21, four year letter man and
w Varsity line coach and assistant
'ector of athletics. Two courses will
offered in football, the one taking
the theory of the game and the
her practical playing. The latter
11 be conducted by means of illus-
ted lectures and field demonstra-
ns.
[nstruction in track and athletic
Lining will be conducted under Kenne
zpatrick. Mr. Fitzpatrick's work in
e coaching of men for track events
well known in sport circles. He
s for-12 years Varsity track mentor
d trainer and has held the same po-
ion for 11 years at Princeton uni-
rsity, where, in addition, he helps
'ect the gridiron men.
Other members on Mr. Fitzpatrick's
tif are Stephen J. Farrell, Archie
hn and William J. Fallon. Steve
rrell, in his younger days, was con-
lered the best middle distance run-
r in America. For seven years he
s track coach at the University of
ine, for two years and a half at
1d State university, and for the past
a years has been director of the
rsity track squads. Archie Hahn,
Ider of many track records, has held
e position of football trainer and
ishman track mentor at the Uni-
rsity for the' past two years. Bill
lion, assistant Michigan trainer,
mpletes the staff.
Offer Classes in Track
Classes will be held in both track
d fleld practice and theory. The
at forms and methods of starting,
rinting, distance running, hurdling,
gh and broad jumping, polervault-
g, shot putting, aund discus, javelin,
d hammer throwing will be careful-
considered and explained. Athletic
itning may also be elected which
11 include lectures and demonstra-
Ms.
Edwin J. Mather, Varsity basket-
11 and freshman football and basket-
11 mentor, will present the curricula
basketball, offering three courses
theory and its practical applica-

LEADS IN THE JUNIOR GIRLS' PLAY, "SCEPTRE AND SERENADE,"
to be given Thursday, Friday, and Saturday df this week at the Whit-
ney theater. Center, Elsa iesen, chairman of play committee; above,
Ruth Werkeiser and Genevieve Peoples; below, Portia Goulder and
Louise Graham.
CSceptre And Serenade" Vehicle
Chosen F.-or JunorGirls' PFlay

COAL STRIKE NOT
FEARED IN CITY
That Ann Arbor would be little af-
fected by the threatened coal strike,
that local dealers here have an un-
usually large supply of coal on hand,
and that approximately $40,000 was
lost on last summer's and last fall's
stocks by city Idealers is the opinion
expressed by one of the representative
coal dealers in this city.
He said that since 75 per cent of the
coal produced was bituminous and
that this was mined almost exclusive-
ly by non,-union workers, and that since
only about 20 per cent of the coal
supply, principally anthracite, was
mined by unionized workers, the men.-
acing strike could not be so serious as
thought to the country as a whole.
Coke, which is an important source of
fuel, will not be interfered with at all
in its production.
It is pointed out, however, that a
railroad strike could easily make con-
ditions serious.
Famous Author-Reformer Says That
Prisons Fall to Get Desired
Results
WILL TALK ON 'CRURCHES
AND PRISONS" HERE TODAY
"I believe that men come out of
prisons worse criminals than when
they entered, arndthat, as a means of
protection to society, they are abso-
lute failure-yes, even wores than
failures," said Thomas Mott Osborne,
noted prison reformer and author, here

"Sceptre and Serenade" is the name
of the 18th annual Junior Girls' play
to be'given on Thursday, Friday, and
Saturday of this weak. This year's ven-
ture is different from most musical
comedies in that it relies to a large ex-
tent upon its plot for success. \
Catchy lines, a quantity of real hum-
or, good music, and -characters who
know just how to play to the best ad-.
vantage of the plot are the oustanding
features of the comedy. Bizarre cos-
tumes, clever choruses, dances, and
solos combine to give a bright and
colorful effect to the whole.
Scenery Elaborate
An additional feature is the scenery
which Is being designed by one of
Detroit's scenic architects, S. O. Davis.
It will undoubtedly be more elaborate
than aly ever attempted by a class
play..
The scene is laid on the tropical is-
land of Marias, where a young man,
VARSITY DEBATERS WIN
HERE A NDAT MISON
MID - WEST VICTORY ACHIEVED
.AFTER TWO CLOSE'
CONTESTS
Michigan scored a double victory in
the recent Mid-West debate which was
held on Friday night, both the affirm-
ative< team at- home and thetnegative
team at Madison overcame their op-
ponent's arguments and won the
judge's decision in closely argued con-
tests.
The members of the negative team:
J. B. Glasgow, '2$, O. W. Rush, '22,
F. A. Greenbaum, '22, successfully
met the arguments put forward by the
members of the Wisconsin team in
their own territory and came off vic-
torious in a "great contest" according
to a telegram received from R. D. T.
Hollister,'of the public speaking de-
partment, who accompanied the team
on their trip.
While the plans for the program of
the Oratorical association's course of
lectures for the ensuing year are not
yet complete, Prof. Thomas E. True-
blood has secured Senator W. S. Ken-
yon, of Iowa, and Glen Frank, editor
of the Century magazine, for two num-
bers.
There is some possibility of secur-
ing ex-Premier Sir Robert Borden of
Canada to speak next year, if he does
not appear this year, in case of the
inability of Irvin Cobb,to lecture.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
MADE FOR BAND SPRING TRIP

INDIANS CAPTURE HI6K HONORS I
NEW B16 TEN INDOOR REC

Tedmar, about to take his vows as a
priest in the Order of Zoroaster, falls
in love with Princess Tahi. Implica-
tions arise when Magus, an influential
wise man of the island, proclaims that
Tahi shall be married to his ward,
Godfrey. More difficulty arises when
Godfrey is found. to be in love with
another. The plot weaves on, bring-
ing to the island a certain professor
who is conducting a scientific expedi-
tion including some Michigan men.
More and more difficulties arise but
they will not be divulged, according
to the juniors, until Thursday night
when the first performance is given in
honor of the senior women.,
Cast Announced
Members of the cast are: Louise
Graham, Genevieve Peoples, Ruth
Werkhelser, Virginia Brodel, Anne
Mushkin, Portia Golder, Carribel
Schmidt, Marion Hall, Mary Ives,
Gladys' Hinman, Marie Hyer, Helen
Roberts,,' Sara Smith, and Mattie
Proudfoot
Members of the choruses are: De-
borah Jones, Dorothy Jones, Anita
Sower, Mary Cutting, Marion Mac-
Lean, Martha McLean, Maud Talcott,
Charlotte Phelps, Janet Studley,Fran-
ces Jackson, Ruth Arie, Helen Elliot,
Grace Hunter, Yolette Finsterwald,
Avon Rich; Mildred VanCamp, Eliza-
beth Hoyt, Catherine Evans, Merry
Wagner, Constance Baldwin, Georgia
Church.
Mirian Reid, Beatrice Campbell, Hel-
en Buster, Lyda Rideout, Janet Meng-
es, Ruth Southerton, Margaret Mac-
Intyre, Nanette Carnahan, Clara Mur-
bach, Marion Frink, Grace Doughty,
Helen Currie, Gladys McConnel, Flor-
ence Boowhower, Frances Ames, Ilene
Fischer, Anna Gabler, Cliveous Han-
cock.
Marion Koch, Katherine Swayze, Lu-
vile Whitfield, Leone Jacobs, Gertrude
Hays, Lucy Huber, Beatrice Cham-
pion, Elizabeth Kingman, Beatrice
Sandler, Mary Ellen Reed, Beatrice
Hoek, Margaret Smith, Katheryn Pot-
ter, Joyce Van Alstyne, Charlotte
Schurz, Louise Eckert, Virginia Tryon,
June Ruelle, Janet Palmer, Dorothy
Bean, Esther Cake, Rose Barton,
Katherine Spafford, Helen Miller, Mar-
garet Whyte, Bernice Kahn, Constance
Wood, Margaret Reineke, Florence
Butcher, Laura Meder, Helen Daven-
port, Charlotte Henricks, Margaret
Mair, Carol Walters, Anne Hindshaw,
Laura Mills, Ruth Waldron, Edna Jar-
chow, Gertrude Stratbucker, and Fran-
ces Klassen.
Members of the committee are:
Elsa Oiesen, chairman; Grace Fry, as-
sistant chairman; Margaret Kraus,
business' manager; Elizabeth Hutch-
ins, costume chairman; Dorothy
Brown, properties chairman; Barbara
Baker, posters, scores, and programs;
Josephine Connable, music; Helene
Torrey, lyrics; and Marion Koch, pub-
licity.
PROF. H. fI CROSS DEFINITELY
DECLINES COLUMBUS OFFER
Prof. Herbert R. Cross, head of the
fine arts department, has definitely
declined an offer as director of the
arts institute at Columbus, 0., and
will remain in the position which he
now occupies. The offer has been un-
der consideration for the past few
months and final decision was reached
but recently.

COOLEY FAVORS FESTIVAL
PLAN f
"It is a good thing, and ought
to be carried through," was the
-comment of Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley, of the Colleges of Engi-
neering and Architecture, yester-
day upon the plan suggested last
week in The Daily, for holding I
an annual homecoming week at
May Festival time, concentrating!
annual affairs as Swing-out, Cap
-I Night, and the annual Spring
gameshwithin that period.
"Other schools do it; why
should'nt we?" asked the Dean.
There is not enough free time
at Commencement for a satisfac-
tory homecoming."
I -
UNIVERSITY SETS WORD
F RD EXPEDITIONS IN
SOUTH AMERIAN FIELD
News of two of the zoological expe-
ditions to South America by the zo-
ology department of the University,
has been received by Dr. A. G. Ruth-
ven, director of the museum 'of zo-
ology.
A letter from the expedition to the
Rio Madeira region in Brazil stated
that the expedition was on the point
of starting its field work. The expe-
dition left for Brazil at the beginning
of the year, and is directed by Mr. J.
H. Williamson, of the University d
Indiana.
This expedition, 'according to the
letter, met the Mulford expedition, sent
out by the Universities of Michigan
and Indiana and Columbia university,
on the upper Amazon river last month.
The Mulford expedition, which left a
year ago to cross the South American
continent from the west coast by way
of Bolivia, was on its way home due
to the illness of its director, Dr. H. H.
Rusby, of Columbia university. The
,Mulford expedition had planned to re-
main in the field another six months.
Plans for next summer's field work
of the museum of zoology were dis-
cussed at a meeting of the honorary
curators of the museum yesterday.
The plans will be submitted to the
Board of Regents at its meeting late
this month.
The honorary curators of the mu-
seum are: Dr. Bryant Walker, De-
troit; Dr. W. W. Newcomb, Detroit;
Mr. Bradshaw H. .Swa'les, Washing-
ton, D. C.; E. B. Williamson, presi-
dent of the First National bank of
Bluffton, Ind.; and Calvin Goodrich;
of the Detroit Journal.
Sunday concert
fleatures Danse
2y N.Debussey
Members of the faculty of the School
of Music will present the following
program at the Twilight concert at
4:15 o'clock this afternoon in Hill
auditorium:
Danse Sacree et Danse Profane,
for piano and strings.... Debussey
Piano, Albert Lockwood; violins,
Marian Struble, Angelina Lock-
wood, D. H. Sinclair, Josephine
Connable; violas, F. A. Schae-
berle, C. H. Post; violoncellos, W.
H. Grant, W. L. Newbury; bass,
W. Wilson.-
Don Giovanni-Il mio tesoro. .Mozart
Myrto....................Delibes
The Serenade..........ley Speaks
Happiness.......Richard Hageman
Odra 0. Patton
Waltz, Opus 69, No. 1; Polonaise,
Opus 44................. Chopin
Nell B. Stockwell

Over the Steppe ... ....Gretchaninoff
The Isle; Floods of Spring....
.... ..... Rachmaninofl
Nora B. Wetmore
Sonetto del Petrarca, No. 6 Liszt
Capriccietto...... .. .Moszkowski
Lotus Land............Cyril Scott
Staccato-Caprice...........Vogrich
Nell B. Stockwell
Dorothy .Wines-Reed, accompanist

WOLVERINES END UP IN I
PLACE; FAIL TO TAK'
ANY FIRSTS
LANDOWSKI FINISHE
SECOND IN POLE VA
Wisconsin Is Runner Up to I
0. S. U. Third by Close
Margin
Evanston, March 20. -- The I
sity of Illinois track team w
annual Conference indoor trac
field meet here tonight with a
ity of firsts- and seconds 4
were broken in the 880 yard
2-5 of one second, in the two n
2 and 1-5 seconds, in the 50 yar
by 1-5 seconds.
Final results were as follow
inois, 44 6-7; Wisconsin, 23 5-14
State, 8 1-2; Iowa, 8 1-3; Mi<
6 1-3;- Minnesota, 5 25-42; Nort
ern, 5 3-7; Chicago, 5; Purdue,
Indiana, 0.
This puts Michigan in fifth ph
Summaries:
50 yard dash--First 'heat,
head, Ohio, first; second, Br
Iowa. Second heat, Ayres, I
fi,rst; Kelly, Michigan, second.
heat, Simmons, Michigan, first;
son, Minnesota, second. FourtJ
Spetz, Wisconsin, first; Wilso
nesota, second. Two Michiga
reach semi-finals. Burke fail
qualify.
Semi-finals, 50 yard dash-Ay
linois, 'first;"Spt, Wisconsin, s
Kelly, Michigan, failed toa
Second heat, Brookins, Iowa,
Moorehead, Ohio, second. M
failed to qualify for the finals.
Finals, 50 yard dash - Br
Iowa, first; Ayers, Illinois, s
Mooreehad, Ohio, third; Spets
consin, fourth. Time 5 2-5. Ti
the Conference record. It is 1
onds faster than last year.
Michigan drew the post in th
One mile run, first, McGinnis, I]
second, Patterson, Illinois;
Wikoff, Ohio; fourth, Switzer
nesota. Time 4:25 3-5. McGini
Patterson finished well ahead
rest of the field. This was '4 4
onds faster than last year.
60 yard high hurdles-first
lin, Wisconsin; second, Johnso
nois; third, Sargent, Michiga
fourth( place because Andersor
nesota, knocked down three b
Time 7 4-5, 1-5 slower than las
440 yard dash-first, Spetz,
sin; second, Pyott, Chicago;
Schlapprizzi, Illinois; fourth,
Illinois. Time 52 3-5, 4-5 s
slower than Butler of Michig
last year.
2 . mile run - Wharton, I
first; Swanson, Illinois, second
Illinois, third; Furnas, 1
fourth. Time 9 minutes, 41:3-
record, breaks former mark a
4-5.
880 yard run-Yates, Illinois
Hirt, Minnesota, second; Wiko:
State, third; , Winter, Min
fourth. Time '1:58 2-5. New
bettering former record by 3-
High jump-Osborne, Illinois
.Glatten, Wisconsin,,and Moo,
Ohio State, tied for second and
Anderson, Minnesota, and Mc
Michigan, Smith, Michigan,
Wisconsin, and Hoffman, Iow
Boon, Iowa, tied for fourth. H
feet, 2 1-2 inches.
I mile relay-first, Illinois;
Iowa; third, Chicago; fourth,
sin. Timne 3:30 2-5.
Shot put-first, Dahl, Nor
ern; second, Sundt, Wisconsin
Cammon, Illinois; fourth, Stipe
igan. Distance 42 feet 6 inches
Pole vault-First, Merrick, N
sin; second, Londowski, Mi'
tied for third and fourth, Faust,
western; Collins, Chandler, I
Hawker, Minnesota; McClure,
man, Wisconsin; Peal, Purdue.
12 feet, 6 inches.

rt OM~1- .AIo Tr on2'

last night in commenting upon the
condition of prisons and corrective in-
stitutions in general.'
"A prison exists for the purpose of
protecting society. There are two1
ways by which a prison can fulfill this
purpose. First, it may do this by the
punishment of ;those within the pris-
on, and secondly, it may do this by in-
stilling within the probable offender a
respect and fear for law. It is evid-
ent that prisons and correctice insti-
tutions have failed in the first purpose,
since men and women are worse upon
leaving them than when entering them.+
As for the extent to which they in-
fluence those outside from the com-
mitting of crime, that influence can
not be determined, it is only theoret-
In speaking of remedies for the les-
sening of crime, Mr. Osborne said
that the influences for good, especially
the church, the home, proper friends,
and the school were the greatest fac-
tors in the prevention and lessening
of crime. But these influences affect
one at the early period of life for the
most part. In dealing with older peo-
ple "less depends upon the severity of
the punishment than the certainty of
its infliction." Herein lies a great
problem, Mr. Osborne believes. "Crim-
inals too commonly escape being
caught," he said, "they 'get away with
it,' still we ought to take courage since
the influences for good are stronger
than those for bad."
With respect to .the "criminal class,"
Mr. Osborne said that "no such class
exists," that the Lombroso theory
which supports such a belief, has been
exploded. "It is true that certain per-
sons are born with a weakness to re-
sist crime, just as some are born with
weak lungs, thereby being susceptible
to tuberculosis."
Mr. Osborne will speak at 10:40
o'clock this morning at the Unitarian
church on "Churches and Prisons,"
and at 4 o'clock tomorrow afternoon in
Natural Science auditorium on "Dem-
ocracy and Education," under the au-
spices of the sociology department.

ourse in fundamentals
1 be conducted by Ray
higan baseball coa
is thoroughly experi
icacies of the natio:
ving pitched for the N
ns from 1909 until he
ice in 1918. Upon rele
ice, he pitched a yeax
ati Reds.
Dr. May on Staff
ds of teaching gyi
examinations, anti
L corrective exercises
d by Dr. George A. IM
director of gymnastic
- D. Mitchell, coach it
I baseball, supervisor
summer playgrounds
imps, and at present

of base-
L. Fish-
lch. Mr.
enced in
nnal pas-
ew York
entered
case from

r for the Committee appointments of the men
who will have charge of the Varsity
band's tour during spring vacation
have been made as follows: Francis
mnastics, Thomas,.'22; chairman; Carlton Pierce,
hropome- '22M, vice-chairman; Hamilton Coch-
will be ran, '22, in charge of transportation
lay, Uni- and routing; Robert C. Moriarty, '24,.
s, publicity; Albert Parker, '23, and'
a basket- Richard Burchell, '23, in charge of ad-
r of nu- vertising.
and boy Tryouts for the poster designs for
director the trip will meet in room 308 of the
conduct Union at 3 o'clock Monday afternoon,
and boy March 20. This will be the first step
,tion and in a general campus competition to
secure a suitable design.

,,1
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i

i.
N. C. R. R. PROMISES PI
CARS FOR SPRING
"No special rates, but p1
cial cars" is Wtle edict of tl
Central Railroad compan3
spect to stiudent reservati
spring vacation. Reservat
made until within two or
of the beginning of vacat
ficials. Special care will
accommodate those goin.
York, Chicago and nearly
tan nnints hnth in the

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