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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-03-14

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Publicationg.
TED PRESS
entitled to the use for
d to it or not otherwise
published tkerein.
or, Michigan, as second

Street.

ords, if signed, the signa-
t as an evidence of faith,
SThe Daily at the discre-
he Daily office. Unsigned
ion. No manuscript will
age.
e the sentiments expressed

JAL STAFF
hone 2414

TOR..........BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
.........................Joseph A. Bernstein
......................Paul Watzel
or................................J. B. Young

G. P. Overton
M. B. Stahl

arty Chairman....................L. Armstrong Kern
ard-
Hershdorfer E.' R. Meiss
k. Klaver
azine Editor.............Thornton . Sargent, Jr.
litor............. ..................George E. Sloan
...........Sidney B. Coates
t ...................................George Reindel
tor.............................Elizabeth Vickery
r.......... .................... .......I. R. M eiss
Assistants
. Anderson H. A. Donahue Marion Koch
erman Dorothy G. Geltz Robert M. Loeb
tron H. B. Grundy J. E. Mack
iscoe Sadyebeth Heath Kathrine Montgomery
er Winna A. Hibbard R. C. Moriarty
rs Harry D. Hoey J. P . Pontius
k Agnes Holmquist Lillian Scher
lark H. 1~. Howlett R. B. Tarr
Cooper Marion Kerr Virginia Tryon
Coughlin M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
MANAGER...............VERNON F. HILLERY
................Albert J. Parker
................John J. Hamel, Jr.
.........................Nathan W. Robertson
.................Walter K. Scherer
............Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Pk David Park D. C. Maltby
ont arks . A. Dryer Harvey Reed
cane T. H. Wolfe George Rockwood
ntiss Paul Blum' E. D. Armantrout
,ldring Stanley Monroe Edward Conlin
William Graulich Lawrence Favrot
TUESDAY, MARCH 14, 1922

sophomores but once" he wails. "The Soph Prom
is our biggest social event." True; we are sopho-
mores but once. But the Soph Prom is not our
biggest social event. The sophomores of this year
vil be the juniors of next, and then they will have
a chance to see what Michigan's biggest social event
really is. Are the Prom, the Frosh Frolic, and all
the other social affairs of the year trying to out-hop
the Hop?
The Prom committee this year has done the best
it could, considering the size of the '24 class, and
it has been surprisingly successful on the whole.
Why cannot somebody be original for once, and
leave out the annual complaints?
THAT DRAMATIC SPIRIT
Michigan's interest in dramatics has been steadily
on the increase, and the recent activities in that line
have more than merited the support which the Uni-'
versity has given to a proposed campus theater. One
of the best efforts in things dramatic probably will
be the drama to be presented Wednesday evening
by the Players club, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
Faculty men who are familiar with this play, which
was written, acted and produced entirely by stu-'
dents, declare that it will be the equal of any produc-
tion that the famous Ijarvard -Workshop 47 has
ever undertaken
It seems only fair to those who have given their
time and effort to this production, that they be given
recognition and encouragement in their work. With
the support of the student body, Michigan can hope
to reach high pinnacles in art of the amateur drama.
A POET ATTRACTS POETS
The announcement that through the efforts of
the American Association of University Women, a
poet lecture course will open here soon, including
such well known figures in contemporary literature
as Padraic Colum, Carl Sandburg, Amy Lowell,
Louis Untermeyer, and Vachel Lindsay, is one
which should appeal to all whose interests run in
the direction of current poetry and drama. It is a
rare occasion indeed, when five personages, so
much discussed as are those who will speak on the
present course, are gathered together under one
management long enough to give us the opportunity
of hearing them.
- The names of the speakers are such that they need
no introduction to University audiences. Padraic
Colum is perhaps the least known of the, quintet lo-
cally. He is an Irishman, a poet, and a dramatist
of no little worth, - one of those men who have
served to make .the Abbey theater in Dublin the
most famous of the "little" theaters in the world.
The other names are those which we read daily in'
the literary columns of our leading magazines. The
opportunity for hearing the speakers is a rare one
which may never come again.
Considerable credit in the matter would seem to
be due to Robert Frost, whose residence here and
interest in local literary circles has doubtless had
much to do with the establishing of the course. We
may well be grateful to him, and to the others who
have made the series possible. Both are helping to
niake 'this a true "poets' year" at Michigan.
A T TA BOY, GILBERT !
,Because he scored loT points for the Maize and
Blue during the 1921-1922 basketball season and
stood fourth in Conference individual scoring, be-
cause during the entire schedule he played full time
every game, and finally because he has been elected
Varsity basketball captain for next year, we nom
inate Gilbert C. Ely, '24D, for Michigan's Hall of
.;Fame. Michigan is grateful to him for his past
services, and wishes him success in the fight he will
lead for the Conference basketball championship,
next year.

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JUNIOR

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To0 Jackson and Lansing- Limited: 9:47
1922 MARCH 1922
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Reblocked at greatly reduced prices."
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
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FACTORY NAT STORE
$17 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
TELEPHONE 214 F.1

Buy your class toques from Daily Shoesrepaired while you wait. C.
fdvertisers.-AdvIG. Andres, 222 So. State.-Adv.

GIRLS'

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MARCH 23, 24, 26
Tickets on sale at Graham's Bookstore
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or-EDW. F. LAMBRECHT
t-M. A. Klaver
der-R. N. Byers

We are now showing
two styles of sport
oxfords

TO CATC
taken by
Ety dollars
y of proper

-I THE VANDALS
Jnion officials in offering a
oi, the apprehension of the
y destruction in the Union
best possible means of stop-
which have been continuing

few

eed regrettable that detective-agency
uld haye tai be used, but the persistent
>parently irresponsible persons make
w "Reward" notice appear mild as a
such contemptible acts as have occur-
on the third floor of the Union have
into, and the furniture they contained
ed. Articles have been stolen from the
>n the fourth floor. A lamp was taken
irth floor lobby some time ago. Copies:
rules have been torn down from the
within the past few days, some notable
ntellectual brilliance has illustrated the
sense of h}imor by running away with
receiver, removed by means of shears
'om one of the booths. Is it any won-
>n has set up a reward for the appre-

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duty of every Union member to
for these guilty ones, that they
justice, and that repetition of
evented. Whoever is to blame
of Union pproperty should be
full penalty. The Union cannot
made the victim of experiments
ndals and thieves.

.ye

PROMENADERS' ANNUAL KICK
:he failure of more than three hundred ap-
:o secure tickets for this year's Sophomore
e disappointed ones have roasted the
mmittee thoroughly, implying inefficiency,
and whatnot. Precisely the same thing
ened whenever the demand for tickets to
tion has been larger than the supply; it is
iew.
viously the charges made against the com-
the main are unfair. It has been argued
'erman and Barbour gymnasiums should
n secured for the party. The answer is
se of the gymnasiums was considered, but
as impossible to obtain them. Further-
sophomores must have food served at their
ey must be satisfied with holding it at the
he gymnasiums have no facilities at hand;
ag meals. Yet again, the rhethod of dis-
tickets has been scored. "Why did it (the
e) not follow that method used by the
23?" asks one complainant. The answer is-
;ommittee did follow the methods used by
Hop committee, but that the plan of distri-

Other People's Troubles
There was a young spendthrift at, Dartmouth,
Who had loads of money to part with,
Though he spent like a fool,
On the last day of school,
He'd have twice as much coin as he'd start with.
It Is Rumored
That one of the brighter Michigan students
thought Homer Heath was the scene of an act in
King Lear.
Famous Sayings of Famnoits Men
"War is Hell."
"Don't meddle with the thermostat."
"Lafayette, we are here."
"Cover your spots."
"The die is cast."
"But we're all damned asses."
"Give me liberty or give me death."
"Don't ask for grades."
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"They Call Him Flannel 'Cause He Shrinks from
.Washing."
An Old Proverb
That rolling stones gather no moss
We all admit is so;
But in the case of rolling bones,
They oft drag home the dough.
Famous Closing Lines
"Remember the Rows," said the theater manager
as he instructed the new usher.
ERM.

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