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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 22, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
every morning except Monday during the University
oard in Control of Stiident Publications.
MBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
:iated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
d all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
i paper and the local news published therein.
the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
n by carrier or mail, $3.50o
nn Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Business, 960; E1ditorial, 2414.
ations not to eceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
sarily to appear in print , ut as an evidence of faith,
events will be published in The Daily at the discre-
tor,.if left at or mailed to The Daily office. Unsigned
s will receive no consideration. No manuscript will
les& they writer incloses postage.
does not necessarily enorsetthe sentiments expressed
lications.
EDIT0RIAL STAFF
Telephone 5414
EDITOR............BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
..............................Joseph A. Bernstein
Editor....................... .J. B. Young

kind of graduates we become, whether the greater
university shall justify itself, and, if so, whether
our own greater Michigan shall emerge pre-eminent
in the ntw era.
This latter outcome is now the goal, for the at-
tainment of which President Burton is anxious to
have everyone get the right idea of what "The
Greater Michigan" means, and then hew to that
idea. Mere bigness - if the paradox may be ex-
cused - is of secondary importance, except as a
pdssible impediment, a source of obstacles to be
overcome. Pride in imposing structures and attend-
ance figures, however justifiable, must be subor-
dinated to insistence on the more intrinsic factors
involved. Not only adequate modern buildings and
equipment of the most approved design, but the most
serviceable curricula and courses that premier edu-
cators can devise; efficient and expeditious business
administration; skillfully conducted classes; a con-,
sistently high grade of scholarship; intelligently di-
versified campus activities; a sound social life; and
graduates at last imbued with some sense of the
dignity and responsibility of life, as well as equip-
ped with such knowledge and training and spirit
as will enable them to exert a steadying and con-
structive influence therein - these are the things,
which are implicit in the slogan recommended by
the President.

IIIIIIfil HM II I II111111111!1111111{1111111111{1!I11111111111lllilI 111 1111110111111111111!11 i i
Text Boo"ks andSupplies ft
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Both Ends of the Diag4
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ORES

I'S

onal Walk

.___ ..

. F. Overton
. B. Stahil
. .t Paul Watzel
.n....." ... rAzllmtrOnz

Kern I

144 edrdde T,. S. Kerr
Magazine Editor...............Thorton W. Sargent. Jr.
ge Editor.......1-----.-------------- ----.George E. Sloan
yyd4t.r.,. ..".'*.i......... w..... ...Sidney B. Cotes
>tditor ............. -. ---...... ....GeretReindel
E+o ... ... .......------------ Viker .'
gsey S. Andergso Dorothy G. Geltz George EXL.ardner
1rce Berman H. B. Gruny -..kH. Lee'
I ,Betiron Sadyebet Heath Robert M. Lob
r). $ri* Winona A. Hihbard . Mack
B. Butler Harry D. Hog t at ine I o tgomery
9L Byers Agnes Holmquist R. C. Moriarty
D. Clark H. E. Howlett J. F. Pontius
ry C. Clark Marion Kerr Lillian Scher
pr .Cgeper L S. Kerr R. R. Tarr
tyn 3. uglin M. A. Kiaver Virginia Tryon
-F. pnahue Victor W. Klein Dorothy Whipple
C,. Zinnwck Marion Koch°
BUYSINEUSS STALFF .
Telephxoac NO0
E XANAG .... --- VERN@N 1. HILLERY
........... .. ........#.... M. Heath A. J. Parker
t . .................. Nathan . Robertson
1.... a............John J. Hame., Jr.
n . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ;^P , - - - - --.. . , H e rol d , C . S t n t
Assistants
C, Rebbin i icardGCutting H. Willis Heldbreder
oley « ame' Prentis W Keneth Glbr"it
9miont Park Maurice Mauie J. A Dryer
rSerenr i \. run Goidring Richartleidemann
Murane . Tyler Ste,# . H. Wolfe
WE DNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 192
Night Editor--M. B. STAHL
Assistant-H. E. Holett
Proofreaders-M. H. Pryor
A. B. Connable
WASHINGTON ,
lshington is the mightiest name of earth, -
simceN mightiest in the cause of civil liberty,
4ightiest in moral reformation. On that name
logy is expected. It cannot be. To add bright-
:o the suin, or glory to the name of Washing:
s,.ali e impossible. -Let none attempt it. In
n awe pronounce the name, and in its naked,
less splendor leave it shining on. - Abraham
gn , S p rin g field , ll., F e b ru a ry 2 2 , 4 2.
"THE~ GREATER MICHIGAN",
the beginning of this school year, President
>n L. Burton suggested the phrase, "The
er Michigan", as a guiding slogan for all con-
d with the University, looking to the future
is institution. He then defined his significant
to mean not neessarily a bigger Michigan, but
r Michigan, a University of quality regardless
:e, or, if one please, in spite of size.
e University of Michigan is already launched
a remarkable expansion. Regarded as a physi-
ant or as an army of people, the greater Mich-
>f the future already is virtually a reality and
ure. The question for serious concern now is
her the high quality of education which has dis
ished Michigan heretofore can be maintained-
ps we should say restored-in face of such in-
e in size.,
e key to this question may be found after all
in the answer to another one, namely, whether
is a limit to the number of students to which
gle university can administer education effi-
v. This is a problem not alone fo- Michigan,
it is obviously as broad a question as the whole
ct of higherr education. Therefore, it must be
rated carefully by educational authorities and
ts, on the basis of the experience already de-
and yet tg be derived from the huge institu-
of these modern times.
ifronted by this problem in the years immedi-
following the World War, university boards
tate legislatures decided to meet it by liberal,
daring, measures. The inadequacy of exist-
cilities being all too evident, and affording no
rial for education on a. great scale, most of
rge universities have taken steps to modernize
xpand their plants to accommodate post-wa
mnents, and the still larger enrollments that
nticipated. The wisdom of this progressive
is not doubted, although it is to be judged by
s which yet lie in the future.
anwhile, all of us have an important part to
[uring the present and forthcoming periods of

tion and test. The efficacy of the super-unt-
y will be gauged by the character of gradu-
t turns out; and our ability to make good su-
ively in future years will depend on what we
th our opportunities and problems as stu-
Whatever the difficulties which may attend
ing conditions, it is for us to determine, by the

T HOSE ELECTION CHANGES
Take from its grave a rule which has been a dead
letter for a long time, enforce it without warning,
and inevitably the victims of the resurrection will
make an outcry. When students who found it nec-
essary to change their elections Monday and Tues-
day were required first to get a treasurer's receipt,
they were naturally resentful. Permissions to
change elections without fine were granted only
when the sections in which the student had en-
rolled were full, or in case he elected a course with
prerequisites which he had not filled owing to a
failure of the preceding semester.
No one can doubt that the number of those who
find it necessary to change their elections is far too
large. Certainly a little more care on the part of
students in making out their programs would elim-
inate the necessity for a large °number of such
changes. The officials in charge counted on the ef-
fect of the dollar fine to produce a grea'ter sense of
student responsibilty and, had it been well known
that the' fine would be imposed, the effect might
have been beneficial. *But the matter was not given
sufficient advanced publicity.
In addition, the new policy was put into effect in
an arbitrary and mechanical manner. Individual
cases actually worthy of special attention were dis-
posed of offhand, with no attempt to take cogniz-r
ance of special conditions governing them. Often
the question was left to the discretion of a membe
of the clerical force. "Get your recepit" was the
formnula of the day.
The old lax system probably did need revision,
but certainly the students had a right to expect fair
and adequate notice of the existence of any such
rulings, and the decisions as to who should be re-
qui red to pay and who should not ought to have been
made its a judicial rather than a purely arbitrary
'fashion.
Once more our comical contemp, the Gargoyle,
has turned over the tombstones and struck its spade
deeply into the earth in the graveyard of wit, and
now blossoms forth in subtle yet emphatic praise of
itself. Ho hum!
Movie hounds would do well tonight to remem-
ber "Theodora" and the Union reading room
project.
The Telescope
A Pastorale
When she first came down from the farm
And rode in on the family~horse,
She saw my speeding Flivv and then
She fell in love with me, of course.
For one whole month we drove around
And never had a single row,
She liked "our Lizz", because, she said,.
It bumped just like a tractor plow.
,But college smoothed her out a bit
And she put on what's called "high tone";
She fell for some guy in a Stutz,
And now I drive my Ford, alone.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackaoa
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars °.-:oi
a. Mn., 7 :oo a. in., 8 :9o a. mn., 9 :oo a. in. and
hourly to 9-.o5 .p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:47 a. m. and every two hours to
LocalC ars East Bound-5:;S a.m., 7:oo a.
pm. ant every two hours to; :oo p. tn., 11.00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-xx:.{o p. in., 12 :25
A. in., :3 A. iM.
To Saline, chapge at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound--7:5 a i., 2:40
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 1o:47, a. mn., 12:47, 2.47,.4:47.-
To Jackson and Laosing - Limited: 8:47
p~m
1922 FEBRUARY 1922
Sr 11 T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12,, 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28
HATS - SPRING - HATS
Reblocked at greatly reduced .;prices.
Turned inside out, with all new trim-
mings they are as. good as new. High
class work only.
FACTORY NAT STORE
417 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
You'll find many bargains 'When you
read Michigan Daily Ads.-Adv.

Sinrce 184
In Knitted Nbrics and Tweeds at
WAG NERWS

ADRIAN-ANN ARBOR BUS
SCHEDULE EFFECTIVE OCT. 10, .1921
Read Down Centr l Standard Time
A.M. P.M. P.M. A&PM
Daily Daily Daily Daily
7:30 1:30 Lv... Adrian's..Ar. 7.00 12:45
8:05 2:05 ...Tecumseh .'.6:2z5 12:10
8:25 2:25 4... Clinton ...'. 6:o5 1I:so
9:15 3:15.......Saline"..... :: 511:00
9:45 3 45 Ar. Ann Arbor Lv. 4:45 1o:30
A UM. P.M. P-.ANI A&PM
Read Up,
SUNDAYS AND) HOLIDAYS

'r
?'
t

P.M.
3 :O
4:05
4: .
P.4.

Lv... Adrian ...Ar.
...Tecumseh.
.Clinton' . ..
Saline. .
Ar. Ann Arbor Lv.

P.M'
9:00
8:25
715
6:45.
PAM

I tDown with Theodora, Jezebel o
yza m cried one from the tkog

But I'm not sad; I have to laugh -
Until my face is red and warm -
At how that tractor plow will feel'
When( she gets back up on the farm.
QuothEppie Taff:
Him tried to lead a spotless life
Like Dere Georg Washington,
But him soon died a sorry death,
Him didn't have no fun.;

immortal drama
For a moment of love she sacrificed
an empire. Heralded universally as the
most magnificant -motion picture ever
produced. 25,000 people in cast, including the greatest screen stars
in Europe. Filmed at a cost of $3,000,000. To miss seeing Theodora,
means missing the greatest spectacle of our times. In 10 reels.
Presented by

C Our Latest Song Entitled:
Pull in Your Neck, Skygack, Here
Woodpecker." . ,- Mary

Comes a
Anchor.

It Is Rumored
That we aren't what you'd call a pugilisti fam-
ily, but you ought to see our ice box.
Famous Closing Lines
"Sleep tight," said his roommates as they dragged
him in andl threw him on the bed.
ERM.

. VETERAN'S MEMORIAL COMMITTEE
The proceeds to be used to finish the Union Reading Room.
Special Music composed for the picture, rendered by
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNION ORCHESTRA
-Hill Auditorium, 7.30 ,
Tickets at Book Stores, Union and Box Office.

I

50

soc

FINISH THE UNION READING ROOM !

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