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February 22, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1922-02-22

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PRESS
DAY ANID NIGHT
Y'EOR

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. WEDNESDAYo FEBRUARY 22. 1922

" PRICE rrm

,,_

w_

PERISH
IRSHIP
1 EAR-THI

GAS
'E WIRE

Burned
sd

y Ky a. -,
airship Roma fell1,000
>day to strike ground
Road3 army base, cap-
high tension electric
into a roaring furnace
ogen gas in which at
army crew and pas-

Dutch Geologist
Announces Talks
Dr. H. A. Brouwer, exchange pro-
fessor in geology, from the Technische
Hooge School, Delft, Holland, is pre-
paring to deliver a series of lectures,
which will take up in a non-technical
.way the geology and geography of the
Dutch East Indies. Doctor Brouwer
spent six years in those islands as a
government geologist,' and the ac-
count of his work should be interest-
ing to the public as well as to those
who are interested in the more tech-
nical side of geology.
The lectures will be given at 4:15
o'clock in Natural Science auditorium
on the following dates: Friday, Feb.
24, "Exploratory Work;" Wednesday,
March 1, "Volcanoes and Earth-
quakes," Part 1; Wednesday, March
8, "Volcanoes and Earthquakes," Part
2; Wednesday, March 15, "Coral Reefs
and Their Meanings;" Wednesday,
March 22, ,"The Growth of Moun-
tains;" and Friday, March 31, "The
Land and Its People."
PLAY MAKES HIT ON. ROAD
Audiences at Port iluron, Xt. Clemens
Praise "Pygmalion''
"Pygmalion," the Bernard Shaw
comedy-drama played by the Comedy
club in Ann Arbor recently, had a suc-
cessful appearance in Port Huron
and Mt. Clemens last Firday and' Sat-
urday nights, according to reports of
the directors and newspaper critics.,
A skill equal to that of any profes-
sional company was credited to the
student players by the Port Huron+
Times-Herald. The dramatic critic
then went on to praise the scenic ef-;
Xects, and the smoothness and ease of
the 'actors. After the performance a
dinner and dance was given to thej
cast by the Port Huron Alumni asso-
ciation.,
The reception at Mt. Clemens is said
to have been more enthusiastic, the
audience there throwing itself into the
spirit of the play. The size 'of the
crowd, which nearly filled the new
MacComb theater, augmented the en-,
thusism during the performance.-
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR .
BALTIC SCHEDULED

Fire Burns Long
after dark tonight the ship
nass of flames from end to end.'
e was increased by the billi'on
gas that had distended the
ag for the flight.
ly a dozen or more ha~ been
up alive. One died en route to
tal. All those who survived the
taped by jumping as the ship'
The others penned in the
aneath the fallen bag were
to deatji. Heat of the fire
pped the rescuers for hours.
fre departments fought the fire
hemicals and by 7. o'clock to-
t was out.
.cks began picking up the
ge of the plane. There was
y more than the aluminum
fork and the six Liberty mo-
move. Within the wreckage
lies of charred, many beyond
f ion. Thirty bodies have been
out stonight. Three or four
re thought to 'be still in the
hatfalone remains of what had
he largest ship of her type in
r.
Everyone Injured
ints of' surviving officers as to
appened were not available to.-
Every man who escaped alive
rned or bruised or both. Eye
es who watched the smash
however, that the huge struct=
the stern rudder, itself as large
mbing plane, had slipped to one
the Roma rode along' an an-
a above the army base. She
aking a trial flight with a new

ARTMAN STRESSES
Chicago Professor Claims Lack of
Religious Education Caused
World War
SHORT SPEECHES INDICATE
OBJECT OF S. C. A. COURSES
"Religious education, the most
needed of al courses, for the lack bf
which we had the 'World War, for the
lack of which we nowrhave the great-
est trouble between capital and la-
,bor, and communities split up into
segments, and for the lack of which
we may have another great war, is
the development of the motives which
cause us to live as brothers among
our fellows," said Prof. J. M. Artman
of 'the University of Chicago last
night at a banquet held at the First
Presbyterian church under the au-
suices of the Student Christian asso-
ciation.
Leadership Is Inherent
"Everyone has unlimited potential
energies for character and personality
which it is the purpose of religious ed-
ucation to release by supplying the
necessary conditions," said Professor
Artman. "We cannot supply these
energies; they are inherent in the in-
dividual. They must be allowed to
develop in him as fruit develops on
the} tree. Leadership in religious ed-
ucation necessitates your own peru
sonal fitness, and help for others." .
In speaking of the late World war,
Professor Artman said that we had
lost immpasureably 'b'y it. As to some
of the things which religious educa-!
tion should teach, he .said, "it should
show that the only educated man is he
who can successfully direct his life,
and make the proper choices in hu-
man conduct. Religious education
showsthe value of good companion-
ship,, and this companionship is the
result of practice."
1 Offer Weekly Courses'
Following the address by Professor
Artman the five men, who are toof-
fer weekly courses in religious edu-
cation at Lane hall beginning Feb.
28 under the auspices cf the Ann Ar-
bor Bible Chair of,,the Student,Chris-
tian association gave short speeches
as to what their respective courses
were to include. Prof. Brand Blanch-
ard's, course will be on "The Hygiene
of the Spirit," Prof. Leroy Waterman's
on "The' Religion of the Prophets,"
Rev. Howard R. Chapman's on "The
Kingdom and: the Nation," Rev.
Charles T. Webb's on "Religious
Drama," and Dr. Thomas Iden's on
"Student Life in the Bible."
KORFF WILL LECTURE
ON RUSSIAN INTERESTS.

Washington, Feb. 21.-On the
eve of the birthday anniversary
of George Washington, at a meet-
ing of the Washington National
Memorial association, final ap-
proval wasgiven of plans for the
erection of a magnificient mem-
orial building to he put up by the
Masons of the United States in
honor of the first President. The
building is to be built upon a
beautiful site at Arlington, Va.,
and will cost approximately $2,-
OOQ,000.
The structure will be situated
upon a ridge which commands a
view of the capitol and the city of

EPENSES ENTAILED IN ESTABLISHING
ROWING- AS SPORT CAUSEDREJECTION

Washington, and lies directly
within the path of the pilgrim
who essays to make the trip from
Washington to Mount Vernon,
home of the "father of his coun-
try."
The action taken by the Mem-
orial association is the result of
many years of persistent effort on
the part of the members of the
Masonic lodge at Alexandria, of
which Washington was at one
time master.
The memorial '.Ilding hen
completed will contain a collec-
tion of Washington memorabilia
and heirlooms.

Project May Be Sanctioned By
At Later Date if Found
Feasible I

BoardI

WOULD COST UNIVRSITY
$20,000 TO SUPPORT

Washington emorialbuilding
Plans Announced Birthday Eve

CREW

.Lberty

'IE HAS

[EODORA" SHOWN TONIGHT
FOR BENEFIT OF UNION
READING R00MN
heodora;" the Goldwyn movie
ed in Italy and starring many of
ope's greatest actors, will be shown
ght and tomorrow night in Hill
torium under the auspices of the
rans' Memorial committee. The
w starts at 7:30 o'clock. - Tickets
be secured at the door for 50 cents
ey have not already been purchas-
t one of the bookstoles or down-
1. The proceeds till be used in
ishing the second floor reading
ni of the Union.
heodora is the daughter of the wild'
nal keeper in the circus' o Con-
tinople.dIt has been prophesied
some day she will wear the'
wn. After a varied life of pleas-
she marries Justin~an, who later
become emperor. As empress,
dora opten leaves the city on
sure jaunts in disguise. Whjle on
of these she falls in love with a
ig fellow of noble birth, Andreas,
interesting developments follow.
>ecial music has been written for
picture, and will be played by the
m orchestra. George Lott, '22,1
is in entire charge of the show,
cts the auditorium to be sold outi
Snights.
TOMOTIVE FIELD" TOPIC
OF CHAPIN'S TALK SUNDAY
oy D. Chapin, '00, of Detroit, pres-
t of the Hudson Motor Car corn-
y', will speak on "The Automotive
d" at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon

Traveling scholarships, 20 in num-
ber, will be awarded by the American-
Scandinavian foundation for gradl-
ate study in Scandinavian countries.
The fellowingships are of at least
$1,000 each for one year of study, andl
may be received for work in any of
the following subjects: 10 in Sweden;
for chemistry, agriculture, adminis-
trative or social sciences, ,forestry,
minng, and metallurgy, hyd'ro-elec-
tricity, language and literature, or
other. humanistic' subjects; .5 in Den-
mark for industrial organization, co-
operative agriculture, agricultural sci-
ences, bacteriology, chemistry, folk
high schools, language and literature,
or other humanistic subjects; 5 in
Norway for weather forecasting,
oceanography, hydro-electricity, for-
estry, agriculture, chemistry, physics,
language and literature, or other hu-
manistic subjects.
Candidates for these fellowships
must have .been born in the United
'States or its possessions, and should
be college graduates and familiar with
at least one foreign language, prefer-
ably Swedish, Norwegian, or Danish.j
Applications must be /in the office o
the American-Scandinavian foundation
at 25 West 45th street, New York, be-'
fore,. March 15. If students wish thelll
endorsement of the University, the ap
plications should-b~e filed at the office
of the President or the dean of the
college before March 1.
HOCKEY TEAM WINS
FROM BADGERS, 5-1
Michigan's hockey team easily over-'
came Wisconsin by a score of 5 to 1'
in the last game of the season last
night in the Coliseum.' The Varsity
team" work stood out at all times
thropghout the game. They carried
the puck down towards the opponent's
goal on successive occasions but miss-
ed the it by inches, due partly to the
stellar guarding of Treadwell, the
Wisconsin goal tender. .
Barkell, Michigan's center, and
Kerr, left wing, starred throughout the
game, while Comb'acker and Ledin
were the outstanding Badger players,
Combacker scoring Wisconsin's only
goal in the third period.
Iowa Students Boycott Poolrooms
(By Conference Radio News Service)
Iowa City, IS., Feb. 21.-Students of
t-he University of Iowa are holding a
boycott on pool halls, ice cream par-
lors, barber shops, and the like, in an
effort to reduce prices to pre-war
standing.' The boycott is proving very

FORMER FINNISH OFFICIAL WILLT
EXPLAIN SOVIET'S PACIFIC
.NEGOTIATONS
6 -.
Baron S. A. Korff, formerly profes-
sor of constitutional lpw at the Uni-
versity of Moscow and later at Hel-
singfors, Finland, will deliver a lec-
ture on "Russia's Interests in the Pa-
cific," at 4:15 o'clock Friday in room
B of the law building.
Baron Korff is a member of the
Constitutional Democratic party, and
under Kerensky was made deputy
governor of Finland. With the advent
of the Bolshevists he was deposed and
later canoe to this county. Last su m-
mer he was one of the six prominent
European's who spoke at, the Institute.
of Politics, at Williams college, and
according to Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of
the political, science department, was
the most successful lecturer there.
He is described as "interesting,
graphic, and vivid in his manner of
presentation," by Professor Reeves.
Baron Korff is residing at Washing-
ton at- present and will deliver a se-
ries of lectures at the University of
Illinois following his visit here.
JUNIOR LITS PLAN SPEECHES,
MUSIC FOR SMOKER MARCH 1
Junior lits will meet at' a class
smoker Wednesday, March 1, at -the
Union, it was decided at a meeting of
the social committee yesterday.
The program for the event, as yet
incomplete, will include 'speeches by
members of the faculty and the class.
Music will be furnished 'by a campus
orchestra, and following the talks the,
meeting will be turned into a general
sing and get-together.',
A class meeting has been scheduled
for 4 o'clock tomorrow in the audi-
torium of Newberry hall, at which
time the committees will report, and
the matter of a class dance will be
discussed. Other important business
to be taken up at'the meeting oduses
an urgent appeal from the president
to members of the class to attend the
event.

"There is no sentiment on the Board
in Control of Athletics against rowing
as a Varsity sport," Prof. Ralph W.
Aigler, chairman, stated yesterday,
"but there is a strong sentiment
against the sport when the expenses
it entails are gonsidered. The board
feels that the money which would
have to be spent on rowing could well
be spent to a'much greater advantage
on some of the other sports which are
now established -at the University."
Explains Action -
The statement was made in explan-
ation of the action which the board
took Saturday in refusing to sanction
the establishment of the sport at the
University,
1lhe expense of supporting a crew
STUDENTS PLAY NOVEL
CHESS MATCH TONIGHT
GEORGE BARNES, '24, WILL OP-
POSE 30 UNDERGRADUATES
AT ONCE
Chess enthusiasts on the campus
will be treated to an exhibition match
of 1 man against 30, when George
Barnes, '24, plays simultaneously
against 30 opponents, the match start-
ing at 7:30 o'clock tonight in the
reading room of the Union. Barnes
will proceed' from one board ;to the
next, making his moves immediately
after his opponet has made his.
Last yeAr Barnes engaged in an ex-
hibition match in Detroit 'with Sammy
Rzychewski, the 12-year-old Polish
boy who astonished chess players in
Europe and the United States by his
prowess at the chess board. The1
match resulted in a tie.
The public is invited to attend the
match tonight, the purpose of which
is to arouse sufficient interest in thej
game to justify organizing a chessI
club. There will be no admission
charge.
The committee in charge of ar-
rangements consists of Kenneth R.
Kerr, '24, chairman; Thomas G.,
Kindel, '24, and Henry Earle, '23.
GOV. SH AFROTH, '75,
DIES IN COLORADO
John F. Shafroth, '75, who was twice
governor of Colorado and who served
two terms in congress as representa-
tive and one as senator, is dead at his
home in Denver.
Mr. Shafroth was born at Fayette,
Mo., where he practiced law after his
graduation from the University. Since
1879. he resided at Denver. He served1
in the 54th and in the 58th sessions of"
congress, 1895 and 1905, as representa-
tive, and served in the capacity of Un-
ited States senator from 1913 to 1919.
He also served two consecutive terms
as governor of his state, 1909-13. The .
University conferred upon fim the
honorary degree of LL.D. in 1909.
SALE OF GARGOYLES EXCEEDS
PREVIOUS RECORDS ON CAMPUS
February sales, aproximating near-
ly 2,000 copies, indicate that the Gar-
goyle again found'favor with the stu-
dents. These figures are practically
the same as those of last month, ex-
cept that upwards of 150 more copies
were sold on the campus than there
srefe last month. A limited number
of copies still remain on sale at the
various news-stands, where they may
be procured by those who failed to get.
them on the campus. .l

DIVIDE AUDITORIUM
SECTIONS FOR
SAIYE

INTO
SEAT

FOUR

here would be approximately $20,000,
according to the figures which the
committee investigating the matter re-
ported to the board. Certain Eastern
the maintainance of the sport but
colleges spend considerably more for
there are but few that spend less than
this figure. The amount named was
considered by the board to be more of
a minimum figure than an average of
the expenses at the different schools.
There are practically no gate re-
ceipts from the sport, certain univer-
sities charging only' *here they are
able to run trains along the course
and charge spectators a price for pass-
age to watch the race in' progress.
This could not be done here, and the
sport would depend entirely upon the
funds earned from other sources.
Co ts Are Disproportionate
In refusing to establish the water
sport on an equal with others at the
University the board merely consider-
ed that the costs were out of propor-
tion and. that at the present time
could not be afforded.
"There is no reason to think that
the refusal means that the decision Is
final for all time," declared Professor
Aigler. "The question has come up
informally before and will be bound
to arise again. Perhaps there will be
a time there will be more in favor of
adopting- the sport. At. the present
time we could not cpmpete as Mich-
igan wishes to compete, with the best
of facilities and equipment."
MAYORDERS REC'EIED
FOR FESTIAL TICKETS

NE~ OKEIO
TOADRESSCROW
AT CONOCTI(
JOHN HUSTON FINLEY WILL TA
BEFORE ANNIVERSARY DAY
AUDIENCE
GLEE CLUB AND ORGA
SOLOIST ON PROGRA
Doors Will Open to Public at 9:
Seats Reserved for Faculty
Members
Convocation .services for Washi
ton's birthday will begin promptly
10 o'clock this morning in Hill ai
torium. The deans of the schoolsi
colleges will attend in academic
tume, and a special block of sqats
been reserved for members I
faculty. The doors of the auditori
will be opened to the public at J
o'clock.
Program Brief
The program will be brief but ce
posed of reliable talent. The spe
er, John Huston Finley, former c
missioner of education for the et
of New York, and at present an edi
of the New York Times, will speak
the subject of "International Ent
glements." The Varsity Glee club
der the direction of Frank L. Thon
of the. School of Music, will render
popular "Soldiers' Chorus," fi
Gounod's "Faust," and there. will
an organ prelude and postlude by E
V. Moore, University orgaijist.
Finley Forceful Speaker
The speaker, Dr. Finley, is wid
known as a° warm, forceful spea
who is capable of holding the inte
of his audience. Dr. Finley rece
his A.B. at Knox college at the ag
24, taking his master's degree there
1890. He has received the honor
degree of doctor of laws from P
college, the 'University of Wiscon
Princeton university, Columbia un
sity, Brown university, Tulane uni
sity, and Williams, Dartmouth, Hot
and Knox colleges.
He was president of Knox call
from 1892 to 1899, taking office th
at the age of 29, the youngest coll
president at that time in the Uni
States. From 1903 to 1913 he i
president of the College of the City
New York. From 1913 until very
cently Dr. Finley 'was commissio:
of education of New' York state
president of the University of
state of New York. He 'resigned th
positions and left .educational work
accept his present position on.
New York Times.
All business places and public bu
ings as well 'as the entire Univers
will be closed all day in commemo
tion of the birthday pf Washington.
Schools Honored
Five high schools ifi the state ho
received special recognition from -
University as being on the Universit
accredited list for half a centu
These high schools are Adrian, A
Arbor, Flint, Detroit Central, a
Jackson. They were apcredited
1871, when the system was first ia
urated. There are now 348 scho
on the list, 303 of which are puT
schools, and 45tprivate or parochial
The fact' that a high school is °
vredited by the University means t
its graduates may enter' Michig
without passing entrance exam i
tions, and the jniversity's list is a
accepted by mA ny other higher in
tutions of learning. -

In his letter of recognition sent
these schpols, the President said:'
simply means that for 50 years y
school has provided those opportun
ies for education which deserve h'
commendation and public approv
Above all, it means that your you
people have enjoyed those educatio'
facilities of a high grade which
evitably reflect themselves in
quality and standards of your cc
nunity."
WAGNER DELIVERS LECTURE
IN SPANISH THURSDAY NI
Prof. Charles P. Wagner, of the
mance languages department, v
conducted a tour through Engla
France,-'and Spain last summer, v
give an illustrated lecture on "A 1
grimage Through Spain" at. ?
o'clock tomorrow evening in Tap:
hall.
This lecture, which will be gi
in Spanish, will be followed by
short business meeting of La So
dad Hispanica at which time the
cancy in the office of president
be filled.

Large numbers of orders for May
Festival tickets are already being sent
to the festival management at the
School of Music since the recent an-
nouncement of the programs, accord-
ing to officials of the school. It is ad-
vised that those who wish seats in.
special sections of the auditorium
make 'reservations early.
The same plan for reservation of
May Festival tickets that harv"been
used for the past several years will be
followed again this season. Subscrib-
ers of record to "patrons' tickets'as
usual will be perimited to reserve the
same- seats, which they held for the
pre-festival 'series, provided they send
in their orders promptly in accord-
ance with individual notices which
have been .mailed to each subscriber
of record.
All remaining seats in Hill audi-
torium will be divided into four
Docks: A, B, C and D, block A con-
isting of remaining seats in the three
middle sections on the main floor, and
the front portion of the first balcony;
block B consisting of the two side sec-
tions on the main floor and the rear
of the first balcony; block C consist-
ing of aproximatelythe front section
of the second balcony; and block D
the back portion of the second bal-
cony.
Course tickets in these respective
blocks wil sell at $7, $6, $5 and $4.50
each, except that holders of course
tickets to the prefestival series may
deduct $3 from the price mentioned,
provided they return with their mail
order, the festival coupon attached to
their pre-festival course tickets. All
mail orders received are numbered
and filed in the order of reecipt and
selections are made as near as possi-
ble to the locations desired.
Professor Parker's Condition Improved,
Prof. W. R. Parker, of the Medical
school, has been convalescing in his
home in Detroit as a result of a re-
cent automobile accident. Dr. Parker
expects to resume his work-soon.

has been a strong sup-
niversity and the Union
s and has aided them in
t only in Detroit but in
places where his influ-
ted. In speaking on his
., he will, be in a field

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