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October 07, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UNIVE!
during
Publicat

ie Univer-
n$.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
is exclusively entitled to the use for
ispatches credited to it or not otherwise
the local news published therein.
ic at Ann. Arbor, Michigan, as second

Ann'Arbor~Press buildiig, Maynard Street.
Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414..
:ations not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig.
cessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of,
ices of events will be publisled in The Daily at the ^
the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dai lyoffice.
imutnications, will receive no consideration. No man-
e returned unless the writer incloses postage.
y does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
communications.
oingOn'" notices will not be received after 6 o'clock
g preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDITOR .......... BREWSTER P. CAMPBELL
naging Editor..................Hugh W. Hitchcock
............................... E. P. Lovejoy, Jr.
. Stahl G. P. Overton
. Adams Hughston McBain
Watzel Edward Lambrecht
:McPike
J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. -Beach, E. R.. Meiss
ditors.................T. S. Sargent, T. H. Adams
or .............................George Reindel
for ... . .. .............Elizabeth Vickery
r ................................ E R. Meiss
.. Assistants
.Grundy ohn Dawson Ben H. Lee, Jr.
F. Elliott idney B. Coates Julian Mack
laver Lowell S. Kerr Howard Donahue
Whipple H. E. Howlett Arnold Fleig
ch Katherine Montgomery
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
MANAGER.............VERNON F. HILLERY
....... ..F..M. Heath, A. J. Parker
.Nathan W. Robertson
................ .......... John J. Hamels, Jr.
............. Herold C. Hunt
Assistants
Villis Heidbreder tTyler Stevens
er K. Scherer Martin Goldring
Cooley L. B. Parks

.rte-

4w

wishing to secure information concerninghnews for
The Dvaily should see the night editor, who has full
news to be printed that night. ..
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1921
Night Editor-EDW. LAMBRECHT-
WENLEYC
ultimate analysis, the worth of a man is
upon his ability and willingness to serve.
y-characteristics can be utilized only as the
s in contact with his fellow humans.
or Robert M. Wenley has worth. He
both the ability and the willingness. He
of botl ..
.ser of time: fades out the unpleasant and
nportant. It places in the foreground the
nd the vital. Alumni of Michigan proba-
Professor- Wenley, his mannerisms and
s, with a greater pleasure and with more
than any of the faculty with whom they
'quained. This statement/ holds for
ce 'o, it holds for those before.
-five years of service! In itself, an en-
hievement, but when coupled with the
e that these twenty-five years have marked
tf progress, that is something more than
it is rightly known as fame.
or Wenley has given to his classes in the
S a mental dynamite that has been good
as has been his aim, pointed out numer-
ems of which we had never thought, and
educed us to think about them. He has
mies, and remembering that it is a credit
iked by some, this is itself a commenda-
or Wenley, twenty-five years in service,
ring, and Michigan should be grateful to
thankful for him.
NG AMERICA'S INSTRUCTION
11 the discussion that took place not long
jazz and the shortconiings of the younger
of the present generation, there was one
note - that the average high school grad-
year or two ago was not nearly so well
for college academic work as his predeces-
e or six years before. It seemed that a
it ordinary number of applicants were un-
ss the entrance examinations of colleges
re them and that it was no unusual thing
ratory institutions of established reputa-
e their accredited standing.-,
lie deficiencies of the high school product
to lack of application, often to the sup-
r example. of the modern parent, and at
r were attributed to the havoc that eco-
iditions were playing with preparatory
ching as a vocation. The war found this
ene of- full membership whose require-
education, aptitude, and ability were rig-
kacted. Its scale of remuneration then
igh in addition, being regulated by school
O had to answer to taxpayers, this scale
ible.
r bore down on it, attracting some, but by
all, the ablest instructors to more lucra-
)ynient, and diverting young men and
th a bent for teaching into better paid
d while many of the old school remained,
ishare of those who took up the life were
nd- capable, the vocation was in danger
ndged: entirely* by the few mis-fits who
it because they could find nothing to do
resent deelopmients may be taken as any

indication of the future, grade school fnd high
school teaching is rapidly retrieving all that it has
lost. Authorities that are placing teachers through-
out the state say that many applications for posi-
tions have been received from persons who are ad-
mirably fitted for the work but who deserted it dur-
ing the war for better compensation. The attend-
ance at state normal schools has increased more than
fifty per cent this fall over last and hundreds of
students have been turned away because of lack of
facilities to take care of them.
The trend of these events shows that once more
teaching positions of all kinds are becoming de-
sirable and that the inefficient or misfit grade and
grammar school instructor will be forced out. This
turn of affairs in a matter of vital national impor-
tance cannot but be hailed with satisfaction both by
those who are concerned with the instruction of
young America and those who are interested in the
welfare of an important branch of one of the old-
est and most respected vocations.
DRAMA THAT'S WORTH WHILE
It is all too rarely in our heydey of musical com-
edy and worthless sex play trash that a real dramtic
opportunity presents itself. When such an occa-
sion does arise, we should be wasters indeed if we
were to let slip by the chance to see and hear some-
thing which is really worth while.
Such an opportunity is now being offered at Or-
chestra hall in Detroit, where under the auspices of
the Detroit Symphony society and under the able
direction of Mr. Sam Hume a classic and modern
repertory of plays is being given which is worth
the attention of anyone at all interested in the fu-
ture of the drama.
Included are Shakespeare's "Merry Wives of
Windsor," and "Midsummer Night's Dream," and
Maeterlinck's "Pelleas and Melisande." Among the
plays of our own day are Oscar Wilde's "The Im-
portance of Being Earnest," said by many critics to
be the wittiest play ever written, George Bernard
Shaw's "Pygmalion," and Eugene O'Neil's "Be-
yond the Horizon," perhaps the most vigorous, ar-
tistic and finished drama which American author-
ship has produced in the past decade.
The mere fact that Mr. Hume is directing the
plays should be sufficient proof to the public of
'their excellence, but to those who do not know of
is work while at the Arts and Crafts theater in
Detroit, the favorable newspaper criticisms will
serve.
The repertory offers a real opportunity for the
public to see what is being done by serious students.
of the theater in America today. There is a vast
field here, the pomise of which we are just begin-
ning to realize and the Sam Hume productions are
well worth the effort of a trip to Detroit.
"Davis of Ohio and Groesbeck of Michigan Will
Be Among Rooters on Stagg field October 22," says.
a headline on the Ohio State Lantern. Evidently
O. S. U. thinks it is going to play Chicago.
Te Telescope
The Customary Cry
Down take the bathers of Sennett,
And photoes of jazz babies stout;
Clean off the wall and the cabinet,
For, roommate, my Mas comm' out.
Bring forth the bible of leather,
The painting of Bill the Boy Scout;
Bring in a spray of sweet heather,
For, roommate. my Ma's comin' out.
Stories We' Don't Believe:
Everyone laughed Wednesday night when a
prominent Ann Arbor tailor entered a meeting of
the University Press- club by mistake.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
A humor editor

This grave does couch,
He died from an
Eternal grouch.
Our Latest Song .Entitled:
"Liberty bond coupons are matters of interest
to their owners."
Maybe, But Three's a Crowd
(Received in our oorrespoidence)
Dear Erm and Erma,
I beg of you,
Can you make room
For Erman too?
She-Which do you like better, blondes or bru-
nettes?
He-Oh, it doesn't really matter to me. And you?
She-I'm not particular about color either.
The Shrew
I have a girl named Anna who
Is quite a curiosity,
But I won't tell her full name 'cause
'Twould rouse my Anna Mosity.
She's quite in style -
Is Mable Stone,
For she has learned
To "roll her own."
Famous Closing Lines
"My second wedding trip," said the widower guest
as he stumbled over the young bride's train.
PRM.

.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Ann Arbor and Jackson
TIME TABLE
(Eastern Standard .Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6.oS a.
m., 7:o5 a. m., S:io a. m. and hourly to 9:ro
P" M.
Jackson Express cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor), 9:48 a. mn. and every two hours to
9:8 p. in.
Local cars East Bound-5'55 a.m., 7:oo a.
m. and every two hours, to 9 :oo p. m., x i:00
p. m. To Ypsilanti only-z:r:40 p. in., 12.25
a. in., t rs a. im.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:50 a. M., 2:40 p.
M.
'To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:48, 10:44 a. in., 12:48, 2:48, :48.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited: 8:481
p. in.

$25.00 -- THE MINIMUM
PRICE FOR DEPENDABIL-
ITY IN A WOMAN'S
-' , ~"""WRIST WATCH
To pay less than twenty-five dollars for a woman's gold-flled
wrist watch is to possess a timepiece of uncertain merit, in which you
would take but doubtful pride.
If a watch this small is to be a dependable timekeeper, its deli-
cately adjusted mechanism must be a product of good craftsmanship-
a craftsmanship not found among the very low-priced watches.
The moderate-priced Gruen Wrist Watch shown here is a sturdy,
practical timekeeper, an ornament of real beauty, a watch well suited
to gratify the most exacting taste.
HALLER & FULLER, State Street Jewelers

1921

OCTOBER

2
9
10
23
3a

3
10
17
$4
31

4
11
s

5
12
19
26

6
13
20
27

7
14
21
28

1921
1
8
15

t/

NOTICE TO MEN
We do all kinds of high-class Hat
work at pre-war prices. Hats turned
inside out, with all new trimmings,
are as good as new..
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792
'AUTO LIVERY
416 S. MAIN ST.
PHONE 583-J
With or Without Driver
Advanced
SECRETARIAL TRAINING
I for StenographersI
MON. & THURS. EVENINGS
Hamilton Business College

Walk-Over English Bulldogs
are the thing this fall,
Good, snappy style with
the fineness of custom
jT" bench work.
Claridge
"' - BLACK OR BROWN
$10 TO $12

for all colleges at both stores

A complete line of textbooks

GRAHAM
Boath ends of the diagonal )Palk

supplies

t
.
~C~1

115 SOUTH MAIN STREET

forty

ne

Cen

,. r

r

r

.4

w E emphasize
the price be-
cause you are al-
ready acquainted
with the quality
of MIRRO ALU-

3
5
4
ALUMINUM
t FILE Rf
G04o
NOVf[%[[pN O

MINUM.

When you call
you will be shown
the merits of
these utensils and
you will recog-
nize the superior-
ity of MIRRO
ALUMINUM h -
these products
combine beauty,
convenience and
durability - the

For the remain-
ing two days of
this week we are
selling a 1% qt.
MIRRO
ALUMINUM
sauce pan at 49c
- this should
prompt , you to
call at our store
today or to-mor-
row and get one
of these sauce-
pans at this spe-
cial introductory
price.

SIIIRRTO ALUMINUM
SIX QUALITY FEATURES OF THIS SAUCE PAN

possession of

1 One-piece, hollow s t e e I
handle With thumb notch,
and eyet forhanging. Heav
ily plated. %
2 Tightly rolled, sanitary
bead, free from dirt-catch-
ing crevices.
3 Strong, flat-headed rivets
keep the handle firm and'
secure.

4 Smooth, rounded edges are
easily cleaned.

them "REFLECT
GOOD HOUSE-
KEEPINW

5 Famous Mirro finish.

6 Famous Mirro trade-mark,
and your guarantee of ex-
cellence throughout.

Jn o.

Col

Ann Arbor Dealer,
JI scher

&rCo.

Up-to-the-Minute
Hardware

4fQUALITY.
10,~

Main near Washington
Washington near Main

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