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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

_ THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MAR

4r

tirogatt Dal-Ill

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
.cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phone: Business. 96o, Editorial. 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3o words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in pt int, but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Esditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor ............................Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors- H W Hitchcock
T. H. AdamsH.W H h
3. 1. Dakin 3. E. McManis
enaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent. Jr.
Sunday Editor . :. ..... - -J. A. Bernstein
City Editor.. ......... ...P.. . Campbell
E~ditorials.... ....... ;:Lee Woodruff, L. A. yKern, T. 1. Whinery
ports.....................Robert Angell
Women's Editor........................ .......Nary D. Lane
Telegraph.......- ;.-...........Thomas Dewey
Telescope................................. ..... Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Waldo Frank H. McPike Sidney B. Coates
Pui G. Weber 3. A. Bacon * C. T. Pennoyer
lizabeth Vickery W. W. Ottaway Marion B. Stahl
G. E. Clark Paul Watzel Lowell S. Kerr
George Reindel Byron Darnton Marion Koch
Harry B. Grundy M. A Klaver Dorothy Whipple
PrancesOberholtzer E. R. Meisse Gerald P.Overton
Robert E. Adams Walter Donnelly Edward Lambrecht
allace F. Elliott, Beata Hasley Sara Waller
ughston McBain Kathrine Montgomery H. E. Howlett

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER............LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
Advertising................................... D . Toce
Classifieds...................................-S.- Kunstadter
Publication..................... ........ ,.......FV. M. Beath
Acounts....................................E. R. Priehs
Circulation..................................V. V. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht M., M. Moule H. C. Hunt
J. Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robrtson '. S. Goldring
. H. Hutchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
F. A. Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
Robt. L. Davis A. J. Parker
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should sAe the night editor, who has ull charge
of all news to be printed that night. ______________
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1921.
Night Editor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.
"BIGGER AND BETTER"
We have all admired at one time or another the
beautiful lines and symmetrical proportions of.
ancient Greek statues. Indeed Greek sculpture has
come to be our ideal of classic beauty. We had
presumed that there were to be found here and
there among the Greek populace youths and young
men whose physical appearance was nearly as
pleasing as the marble images which have survived
through the centuries.
'Tis not so. We have been sadly disillusioned by
one, Prof. R. T. Mackenzie,of the University of
Pennsylvania, who says: "The American college
man is bigger and better than the highest type of
young Greek in the golden days of Athens," not,
mark you, better than the average Greek, but big-
ger an better than the highest type of Greek.
We grant, without argument, that most of our
best physical types are to be found in intercollegiate
athletics. And yet we try vainly to recall many men
in football, track, baseball or basketball who dis-
play the physical beauty of "The Wrestlers" or
"The Discus Thrower". We have seen numerous
men of undoubted power who were tall and angular
or short and bulky. Some are apparently all legs,
others all arms and shoulders.
We admit their speed, their stamina, their ability
as athletes, but we fail to see in their angular lines
or their stocky bodies, the grace, the suggestion of
effortless strength which inheres in the Greek statu.s
If our athletes fall short, how much more do we
who are not athletes miss the mark of physical per-
fection which was the endowment of the best of
Greek youth?
If mere bulk is to be considered as both bigger
and better, then we probably have the best of the
argument. Northern peoples naturally would. But
we were under the impression that line and form
and proportions all had their due place in judging
physical class. We regret our error, but candor
compels us to add that we are sorry to see that an-
gles and bulk are more desirable than the aesthetic
proportion which can come only with symmetrically
balanced development.
America turns out her great-girthed hurlers of
the shot; her distance men have tremendous stam-
ina for their one event; her boxers and wrestlers
are trained for years in their particular fields; her
football teams could probably wipe the turf with
a similar aggregation of ancient Greeks, and her
best dash men could almost certainly breast the
tape ahead of the men Praxiteles modeled; but all
this specialization, while it has produced speed and
beef and - what most we all desire - victory, has
robbed us of that element which the Greeks embod-
ied in their ideal, the standard of all-around bodily
perfection. Less of the one-sided and purely com-
petitive in American athletics, and more devotion
to the goal of well-rounded physical development
and good health not in the few, but in all, is cer-
tainly a higher aim than the "bigger and better"
which we have attained.

THE PROBATION PERCENTAGE
A mighty scrap with the pen rather than the
sword has arisen over the lamentable fact that
nearly one-fifth of the lit student body went on
probation this semester. A lit has asserted that
such a large percentage denotes a weakness in the
faculty staff; an engineer seems to hold the point
of view that the students are at fault. This is
evidently not merely a two school argument but one
which has resulted from the sincere personal be-
liefs of those originally concerned.
That everyone is entitled to a university education
is undeniably true with two provisos, - first that
he conscientiously desire one, and second that he be
mentally capable of acquiring one. The great ma-
jority of delinquent students are low because they
do not study; the mentally incapable seldom reach
a university standing.
According to inquiry which has been made into
the matter at forty different colleges throughout the
country, both state and endowed included, from
one-fifth to one-eighth of the total enrollment of
practically all institutions are of probation ranking
at each. Entrance examinations make little dif-
ference ill these figures; in fact at one university
where both the examination and certificate methods
are employed, a larger percentage were on proba-
tion from the former group than from the latter.
These facts clearly indicate that it is the irresponsi-
ble rather than the incapable individual who swells
the probation list.
The university is an institution for those who
desire to learn and are able to do so. The sooner
that those lacking in either of these sine qua non's
are weeded out, the better it will be for both those
who are earnestly attempting to learn, and those
who are equally in earnest in their endeavor to up-
hold the high standards of teaching which a uni-
versity shild set forth.
LEAVE MICHIGAN SOME GRASS
Recenty, in fact only two days ago, an upper-
classman observed a freshman walking across a
lawn and gave him a piece of advice in a tone none
too friendly. When the upperclassman had finished
his tirade, the yearling turned around and said,
"Well, look again." The upperclassman looked
again, and there on the same well-beaten path
which the freshman had crossed were two students,
one a senior and the other a junior. Such affairs
are daily occurrences, and, at this time of year es-
pecially they present a serious problem.
A beautiful campus is a matter of pride, but is.
only possible when freshmen, sophomores, juniors
and seniors all learn to appreciate the fact that
sidewalks, and not the lawns, are after all the best,
if not the quickest, means of getting to class.
The prohibition of jazz rather than the prohibi-
tion of liquor is now the order of the day in Hun-
gary. The only difficulty is that dancing doesn'tj
have to be imported or held in stock.
~ The Telescope
He removed, when he learned that she had fled,
Her photograph from-the case.
"She has broken my heart," he weeping said,
"And I will break her face."
Dear Noah:
Why do the newspapers so often refer to some
minister as a "Fighting Parson"?
Lord Helpus.
We don't know unless it is because he often puts
the congregation to sleep.
One objection we have to
Many of the girls around
This man's school is that
They're just like a ball of twine.
You know what we mean,
Sorta all wrapped up in themselves.
We thank you.

The following little ditty we have called "A
STEADY JOB" or "WAITING FOR A LI-
BRARY BOOK":

DETROIT UNITED LINES s
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Nnn Arbor and Jackson
t Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave, for
Detroit at' 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. mn.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. n.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and esery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. mn.,I
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 i. im., and
12:10 P.m.

Wuerth

Arcade

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_ O

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iiUMONNW

I

A NEW SHIPMENT OF
EXERCISES IN CURRENT ECONOMICS--- Hamilton
AT
G ItA HA M
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

MARCH
S M T W T F S
1- 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
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blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

I

11

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This No.
for
Dodge
Taxi

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SADDLE PONIES
427 SO. MAIN Phone 1687-R
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M!OreThan Money
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That the public appreciates this service is best told by the fact
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GENERAL AGENTS

711 North University Avenue

The Equitable Life Assurance
FRICK BUILDING, - -

Society of the United States
- PITTSBURGH, PA.

.1

I strolled into the library,
To get a needed book,
Filled out a slip, went to the desk,
And there my post I took.
And thus I stood. Behind the desk
A group of toilers never shirk
Their all-absorbing business
Which is that of dodging work.

Those English Golf Suits
made of beautiful rough woolens
are now being shown.
The very small select stock re-
quires your prompt action.

And they excel. After awhile
One less expert than the rest
Picked up my slip, frowned, scratched his head,
And said he'd do his best.

Coat - Trousers - Knickers

- Sixty dollars -

I think he did. An hour I waited
For that much obliging chap,
But safe behind a wall of books-
He surely took a nap.

WAGNER & COMPANY
State Street at Liberty
Established 1848

At last he came, he brought no book,
But instead a look of doubt,
And said, "I think it isn't here,
But if it is, it's out."
Pamous Closing Lines
"A prepossessing appearance," he muttered as
he saw the shoplifter put the goods under his coat.
NOAH COUNT.

Jir_ ____ ____ ____ ____

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