100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 30, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



E~l PRESS
__ tDAY AND NIGTIT RE
TITRE TODAY j SERVICE
VOL. XXXI. No. 126. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

E I t f

BERMAN POLC
MAKE PROGRESS
AGAINST REIOLT

ENTIRE RESULTS OF FIGHT
TO BE LEARNED, SAYS
REPORT

YETI

REDS SEIZE RAILROAD,
TRAFFIC INTERRUPTED
Members of Both Sides Killed in
Fighting Yesteray at
Essen
(By Associated Press)
London, March 29.-WhI1e the po-
lice in Central Germany are report-
ed to be making satisfactory progress
in stamping out the remants of the
revolt, says a Reuters dispatch from
Berlin, there are indications of the
spread of the Red movement In the
Rhineland and Westphalia. Commun-
ists from Elberfeld and Duesseldorf
have occupied Nettman,, according to
the dispatch. The result of this fight-
ing, the correspondent said, is un-
known.-
Therailroad between Elberfeld and
Cologne and Elberfeld and Duessel-
dorf has been seized by the rebels and
traffic interrupted.
At Dortmund communists attacked
the police and killed one and wound-
ed another. Six of the attacking par-
ty were arrested. A state of siege has
been declared in the district of Mun-
ster and Arnsberg and the unoccupied
parts of Duesseldorf.
In occupying Duesseldorf the En-
tente has returned arms to the po-
lice to defend the city against the in-
surgents.
Ths dispatclf'says sanguinary fight-
ing occurred yesterday at Essen be-
tween the police and the Reds. Ac-
cording to the Montagspost, two police
were killed and several wounded,
while 10 Reds were killed and 20
wounded.
Warning Issued
On Fire Danger
Warning against the lighting of
fires on University property, Prof
Leigh J. Young, of the forestry de-
partment, recently issued the follow'
ing statement:
"Let picnicers and campers remem-
ber that the Saginaw forest and the
Eber White woods west of the city,
more commonly known as the forestry
farm, are primarily outdoor labor-
atories, and all other use of them is
strictly incidental. Because in former
years several fires carelessly left
burning have been put out just in time
to prevent disaster the department
has deemed it advisable to prohibit
all fires on our property. Individuals
violating this order will - find them-
selves afoul of the law. Should a fire
once gain much headway in this tract
it would require 17 years and some
thousands of dollars to repair the
damage.
"The property is now open to the
public for legitimate and considerate
use, but continued wilful disregard of
property right will compel us to ex-
clude visitors. This is a bad time of
the year for forest fires."
EDUCATORS FAVOR
MENTAL TEST PLAN
Reports, with regard to the results
of the use of mental tests and meas-
urements throughout the state, given
in the Natural Science auditorium last
night, seem to indicate that the sys-
ten is proving to be a great success.
Principals and superintendents from
over the state testified to the aid
which they have received from them.
Some seemed to feel that for the
present the tests can be used only as a
means of helping teachers to estimate
better the ability of their pupils. Oth-
ers were of the opinion that the tests

can be used at once as a means of
classifying students into groups for a
particular type of study.
Numerous examples of individual
cases in which the system bias proved
a success were cited. The majority
of the speakers of the evening com-
mended Prof. G. M. Whipple and his
department very highly for the assist-
ance they have given the educators of
the state.

?ioxing Program
To Include louts,
Faculty Talks
Various boxing bouts and faculty
speeches will be given at a meeting
of the Boxing club Saturday night at'
the Union to which more than 100
guests have been invited.
The exhibition will open the Boxing
club's campaign for members. Those
who have been invited to the meeting
were chosen for their interest in the
sport, and it is planned to select mem-
bers for the club from those guests
present. Donald Shelton, '22, presi-
dent of the club, is anxious to arouse
campus interest in the sport and will
welcome inquiries concerning boxing
activities from all students.
Among the bouts to be ipresented,
those between M. C. Hawkins, '23, and
Norman Buchan, '22; and M. A. Mills,
'23E, and R. V. Paton, '23, are ex-
pected to be the main attractions as
all of these men have wide ring ex-
perience and reputation, according to
Shelton. The other bouts will be be-
tween some of Coach Ted Sullivan's
pupils.
Dr. George A. May, director of in-
door athletics, and Coach Sullivan will
be among those who will address the
guests on the value of boxing and its
proposed position on the campus.
UNUSUALLY COMPLETE
CURRICULUM OFFERED
BY SUMMER SESSION

EDUCATORS SPEAK~
ON IMPROYEMENTS
IN SCHOOL SYSTEM
OPENIl SESSIONS OF SHORT1
TERM INSTITUTE HELD
YESTERDAY
WOMEN'S COLLEGES FAR
BEHIND MEN 'S SCHOOLS
Professor Snedden of Columbia Also
Complains of Time Spent in
Preparatory Courses
Novel ideas for the improvement of
methods of civic and rural education
were proposed and discussed at the
opening sessions of the seventh short
term state institute in Lane hall yes-
terday.
"Women's colleges are more tenac-
ious of algebra today than are mostl
men's schools," was the statement ofl
Prof. David Snedden of Teachers' col-
lege, Columbia university, at the after-
noon session. "They are about 20
years behind men's institutions."
Urges More Usage .
Professor Snedden's lecture in the
morning was on "Quantitative Limits
in Educational Values." He com-
plained that too much time is spent
in preparatory work on courses which
do not warrant it. Less grammar and
a greater amount of correct usage is
one of the things which he urges. "I
think that the amount of arithmetic
taught can be greatly reduced, but
what is taught should be far more in-
tensive." Less quantity and more
quality in the less essential subjects
was the key-note of his address.
In the afternoon he spoke on "Jun-
ior High School Curriculum Propos-
als." His idea is to teach the prac-

Upper Engineers
Have Cooley A s
Guest Of Honor
Entertainment for the banquet giv-:
en last night at the Union in honor
of Dean Mortimer E. Cooley by the
upperclass engineers was furnished
by the speeches given by Prof. II. C.
Sadler, of the marine engineering de-I
partment; Joseph A. Bursley, Dean of
Students, and Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley. The speeches were intersper-
sed with musical numbers by the Var-
sity string sextette and the Varsity
quartette.
Dean Bursley gave an interesting
talk on "Engineering at Michigan
from Course to College." Prof. H.
C. Sadler followed Dean Bursley with
"Personal Incidents in Dean Cooley's
Regime."
Dean Cooley then gave the final ad-
dress on the program when he spoke!
on his "Reminiscences of the Engi-
neering School." He told in an inter-
esting manner the condition in which
he found the engineering college some
30 years ago when he first became an
instructor in the civil engineering de-
partment of that college.
Dean Butts then closed the evening's
entertainment with a short toast to
Dean Cooley after which the entire
audience of some 500 students and
faculty rose and sang the first verse
of "The Yellow and Blue."
AL LEGION MEMBERS
IVIE TO ATTEND
LOCA POST MEETINGS
BONUS FOR EX-SERVICE MEN OF
MICHIGAN IS
FAVORED

SENIORS VOTE FOR "O U 5
COUNCILMEN TODAY HOTDO1" A
From the four nominees up for then
position of student councilmen, two FDRST N Iii T[H
are to be elected by the senior liter-
ary class today.
Voting will take place in the booth
in U niv y jit i l h nll . (4t n 9 and 12

in nvers y na DeweenUsu1
o'clock this morning and from 1 to 3
o'clock this afternoon. The four can-
didates on the ballots are: Lowell B."
Genebaugh, Dwight P. Joyce, Armand
V. McPhee, and Marland B. Small.
Fred J. Petty, president of the class,
desires every member of the class to
vote today.
UIKOFRAI91L SYSTEM S
A dministration Hopes to Formulate
Program for Rehabilitation
of Roads
HARPING TO CONSULT WITH
TRANSPORTATION CHAIRMEN

INITIAL
GOES

PERFORMANC
OFF SMOOTHLY

MIMES ACHIEVES OBJECT IN OF-
FERINM EXCELLENT
SHOW

Dramatic Ability of Leads and Execu-
tion of Chorus' Steps Merit
Prase

ENTIRE

ECONOMICS FACULTY
WILL BE CARRIED
OVER

An unusually complete curriculum
will be offered -by the Summer session
this year, according to Dean E. H.
Kraus, especially in the departments
of history, political science, and eco-
nomics.
In history there will be nine cours-
es, given by a faculty consisting of
Profs. A. L. Cross, W. A. Frayer, A.
E. R. Boak, U. B. Phillips, E. W.
Dow, and C. H. Van Tyne. In the list
are such courses as History 2 and
14, the classical courses of Professor
Boak, and a course on the British em-
pire by Professor Cross.
The economics department will have
every group offered in the regular ses-
sion represented, according to Profes-
sor Sharfman, the head of the depart-
ment during the summer. The entire
faculty will be carried over and will
present a total of 19 courses. The ele-
mentary courses and the groups of la-
bor problems, money and banking, cor-
porations, marketing, accounting and
auditing, and sociology will be repre-
sented by at least one course in each,
the total being the most complete cur-
riculum that the department has ever
offered during the summer.
Profs. Jesse S. Reeevs and R. T.
Crane will give lecture courses in po-
litical science, the subjects being
American and municipal government,
international law, and principles of
politics.
A special feature this year, accord-
ing to Dean Kraus, will be the cours-
es in embalming and sanitary sci-
ence that will be presented by men
from the regular chemistry depart-
ment and practicing embalmers from
the state. Fifteen scholarshipsrof
$25 have been established by the
Michigan Embalmers and Funeral Di-

r
t
E
t

tical arts such as manual training, Emphasizing the fact that the
school-gardening, and cooking on a American Legion is essentially a na-
broader scale. tional organization and that a part in
Keep Education from Politics the activities of each post is not lim-
Dean E. P. Cubberly, of the educa- ited entirely to local members, the
tion department at Leland Stanford, University post recently went on rec-
in his talk on "Rational State Educa- ord as extending an invitation to all
tional Organization," in the morning, Legion members in the University to
urged that state administration of ed- attend the meetings and keep in touch
ucation be taken out of politics and with proceedings here, even though
run on the same basis that the city they did not care to transfer their
schools are run. membership.
"The County Unit in School Admin- The local organization has also re-
istration" was his subject in the aft- cently voiced its hearty approval of
ernoon. He urged the elimination of the amendment to the state constitu-
duplication by the consolidation of the tion providing for a bonus of all Mich-
county schools. Furthermore, he stat- igan ex-service men. This plan is to
ed that he wanted to put a premium be submitted to the state for a vote
on brains and run the county educa- (Continued on Page Six)
tional system as that of the city.-
"The trouble under the present or- YALE PROFESSOR
der is that nobody has any power toI TO LECTURE HERE
achieve anything. The county super- T-
intendent is held down too much," he
said. "Reflections on the American Revo-
The program for today is: lution" is the title of a lecture to be
9:00-Appreciation-Can and Should given by Prof. Charles M. Andrews
They be Taught. Professor Snedden. of the history department of Yale uni-
10:30-Finance, the Key to the Sys- versity at 3 o'clock Friday afternoon
tem. Dean Cubberly. in Natural Science auditorium. Having
2:00-Comparative Values of Dif- had 30 years' experience as a scholar,
ferent Methods of Civic Education. Icciurer and teacher of history, Pro-
Professor Snedden. i-cr Andrews is, according to one
3:30-Nature of the Superintend- critic, the greatest authority on early
ent's Work. Dean Cubberly. American history living today.

(By Associated Press)I
Washington, March 29.--A compre-
hensive study of American railway
conditions was begun by the adminis-
tration today with a view to formula-
tion of a definite program for railway
rehabilitation.f
For more than an hour PresidentI
Harding discussed the problem with
his cabinet, and later it was announc-
ed that he would call into consultation]
within the next few days the chairmen1
of the two government agencies hav-
ing closest contact with transporta-
tion problems, the interstate com-
merce commission, and the railway
labor board. Conferences with rail-
way managers and employees are ex-
pected to follow in time to permit ac-
tion at the coming special session of"
congress.
Discussion Was Preliminary
Discussion at the cabinet meeting
was only of a preliminary and inde-
cisive character, but there were indi-
cations that the chief executive and
his official advisors were much con-
cerned over information which so far
has come into their possession. Since
it took up the reins of authority the
administration has heard rumblings
of dissatisfaction from many sources,
the roads complaining of inadequate
income, the employes protesting
against impending wage reductions,
shippers asking for a reduction of
freight rates, and in some cases the
general public appealing for better.
service.
All these points of dissatisfaction
are to be examined in the administra-
tion inquiry together with the general
relation of a healthy transportation
industry to the nation's commercial
life.

By H. Hitchcock and R. Sherwood)
"Hot Dog!"
Kissable chorines christened in
reen River to the tuneful lilting ly-
ics and doleful blues of "Top o' th'
ornin'" branded Mimes with the
uperishable mark of having achiev-
d their object, for they are offering
> the members, friends, and alumni
f the University an opera that not
mly surpasses former productions but
lso adds new flavor to the term "am-
teur theatrical".
Although the strains of "Honey",
Peggy O'Dare", "Swing Along",
Dublin Walk", and "Satan Put a Dev-
i in the Irish" will remain longer in
he minds of the audiences, the dra-
natic ability of the leads and the
killful execution of the chorus' in-
ricate steps merit equal praise. The
yrofessional tinge that resulted from
he long weeks of strenuous training
nder the tutelage of E. Mortimer
huter was tempered by the occasion-
1 misstep or masculine awkwardness,
dding the laughable touch of col-
egiate first-night nervousness.
Plot Appears
There is a plot. It appears now and
hen with new revelations concerning
he love affair of Peggy O'Dare and
arry Donovan, but author and music
Nriter have collaborated so well that
,he continuity of action receives well
:he injection of songs, dances, and
;pecialty numbers.
"Hot dog" again! as Miltiades Fitz-
erald, Hilliard Rosenthal, '21, born
>n Black Friday, the 13th day of the
month, when it was raining, took
eading honors with his black face im-
personations and "Paris Green Blues.
His song, "Hot Dog", drew "mores
from the enthusiastic crowd until the
verses were exhausted. With Philip
Ringer, '22, and Earl Powers, '22, he
managed to keep up to the waving
baton of Earl V. Moore, who nursed
his orchestra to beat out the bars of
the tricky dance.
Keena and Stevens Please
KempKeena, School of Music, took
he leading male role opposite E. Mar-
lowe Stevens, '21E, who quite belied
his chosen profession, in the part of
Peggy O'Dare. Each displayed capa-
ble rendering of their part and
Keena's smooth tenor proved more
pleasing than usual. Commendable
mastery of femininity characterized
the work of Stevens.
Rare is the opera whenthe scenery
alone Wins applause as it did at the
rise of the curtain for the second act.
The scenery and costumes are such
that the show couldn't help but be a
success.
Were it not for the occasional heavy
beard which no amount of powder
could conceal, the ungainly leg here
and there and the perplexing mass of
arms, Flo Zeigfield would shed a tear
of regret and fire his Broadway beau-
ties.
Absence of Piano Felt
Not even full-dress suits could cov-
er up the lack of co-operation which
made itself apparent at times between
the cast, chorus, and orchestra, and it
wasn't the fault of the cast or the
chorus! What happened tothe piano?
There wasn't any.
With a splendid finale that must
have taken diligent labor to perfect,
the last curtain fell on a performance
that satisfied everyone in the capacity
house. "Top o' th' Mornin' is a good
Michigan opera.
Street Car Men Refuse Demands
Cleveland, Ohio, March 29.-Repre-
sentatives of the street car men's un-
ion, meeting with John James St.nley,
president of the Cleveland Railway
company, late today refused to ac-
cept the company's demands for an

ropen shop at a 20 per cent salary
reduction, and other amendments to
the wage agreement which expires on
May 1.

t
s

i

Certain Points Exaggerated, Says
MacKenzie Of Article In Times

i

rectors association, open to students "Big universities are taking moneyI
who can qualify to admission to the under false pretenses. The university 1
courses. professor is the smallest man on1
earth, merely filling his position to
JUNIOR LITS TO NOMINATE FOR accumulate knowledge. He is an in-
CAMPUS OFFICES TODAY telligent miser, not a teacher." Such
- was a statement in the New York
Nominations for various campus Times credited to David McKenzie,
positions will be held at a meeting dean of the Detroit Junior college in'
of the junior literary class at 4:15 an address before the Detroit Twen-
o'clock this afternoon in room 205, tieth Century club recently.
Mason hall. The student manager of In a long distance interview with
the baseball team as well as candi- ? The Daily last night, Professor Mac-
dates for the office of student council- Kenzie substantiated some 'of the
men will be nominated. statements in the article concerning
Plans for the social and scholastic large universities, but stated that cer-
program, which is to be adopted by tain points had been greatly exagger-
the class this semester, will also be ated.
formulated. Would Not Criticize Michigan
0. W. Rush, president of the class, "The last thing I would do would
strongly urges that all members at- be to criticize the University of Mich-
tend the meeting as several other ' igan," said Professor MacKenzie to
things of importance to the class as a The Daily. "I merely stated that
whole will be considered as well as when any university admits a student
things which will concern the vari- that it should be more or less respon-
ous activities for the balance of the sible for him and give full value for
year. money received."

The article in the Times continued
quoting from Professor MacKenzie:
"'University classes are so big and
the professors so indifferent that stu-
dents do not have the opportunities
for education that they have in the
junior college. The big universities

Advise Against IncreaseP
It is understood that although few b
definite remedial programs have been B
suggested in these conferences most p
of those who have presented the car- n
riers' side of the problem have advis- t
ed against any general increase of
freight rates. On their side the rail-a
way employes have vigorously protest- r
ed against wage reduction.
SCULPTURE COLLECTIONS As
SUBJECT OF PROF. CHASE
George H. Chase, Hudson professor
of archaeology at Harvard univer-a
sity, will deliver the first of a seriesa
of three lectures at 8 o'clock this c
evening in the upper auditorium oft
Memorial hall on "Greek and Roman
Sculpture in American Collections."
Professor Chase is reputed to be anE
archaeologist of considerable renown r
and experience.t
His chief aim in the lecture will beI
to point out the extent and value of<
ancient sculpture in American mu-'
seums, supplementing his talk with
numerous illustrations.3
Dr. Chase, who has travelled exten-
sively in Greece, Italy, and Asia Min-1
or, has been brought here in connec-
tion with the classical conference of
the Michigan Schoolmasters' club. The
lecture is to be given free of charge.
RESIGNATION OF MORRIS AS
JAPAN AMBASSADOR ACCEPTED
Washington, March 29.-- Resigna-
tion of Roland S. Morris as ambassa-
dor to Japan was accepted today by
President Harding, according to an
announcement at the state depart-
ment.

are taking money under false
tenses.'
Faculty Scored
"Professor MacKenzie scored
University of Michigan faculty
sending back to their homes
month 300 students branded as
ures. 'To brand a student as a

pre
the
for
last
fail-
fail-

ure is to damn him
life,' he said."

for the rest of hisI

Commenting further on the article,
Professor MacKenzie said: "What I
said holds true to a great extent to
universities as a whole, but anythingl
which might appear against the Uni-
versity of Michigan from the article in
the Times is absolutely without foun-
dation. There is no institution which
I respect more." -

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan