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March 24, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICI

1AN DAILY

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SOTHR DIAMOND
TRIP AA
Players Round Into Shape With But
Two Weeks Remaining Till
Dixie Jaunt
RUZICKA, VETERAN HURLER,
AT HEAD OF STRONG STAFF
With two weeks remaining until ,
the baseball team begins its
invasion of the South to meet some
of the strongest nines in Dixie, Coach
Pratt is utilizing. every possible min-
ute to build up a winning combina-
tion. The outdoor work is welcomed
by the members of the squad, and in
spite of the chill breezes that sweep
Ferry field at times, considerable val-
uable experience is being gained in the
daily drills and skirmishes. .
Personnel Unknown
Coach Pratt will say nothing as yet
concerning the team's personnel for
the, Southern trip which 15 men will
make, but his lineups in the practice
games have indicated what combina-
tion he will probably use. At the pres-
ent time Ruzicka is the only veteran
hurler, and upon him will rest the
chief pitching responsibility. However,
in Torrey, Liverance, and Mudd, Coach
Pratt has a number of youngsters, who
will undoubtedly develop into depend-
able. slabmen, and they will help in
making the Wolverine pitching staff at
least an average one.
At shortstop Pete Van Boven, re-
cently elected captain, seems to have
the call, and from his speedy perform-
ances at the keystone sack last year, it
looks as if the new leader will have
little difficulty in filling Knode's place.
Pete is a heavy hitter and in yester-
day's -practice slammed the ball out.
Infielders Doubtful
Uteritz, member of the 1920 All-
fresh, seems to be a fixture at third.
The diminutive third sacker is a fast
man, being a sure fielder, and will
most probably be a heavy hitter. Kar-
pus and Hickey are rivals for second,
with the basketball captain favored
because of his two years' experience.
The competition for first base has ap-
parently narrowed down to Johnson
and Shackleford, both southerners,1
who are first class players. Pratt's
choice for this position will probably
be the one that proves to be the better
hitter, for both are dependable field-
ers.
Vick Certain at Catch
Ernie Vick has been demonstrating
his ability at handling the pitchers
and will probably be the first string
catcher, with Coates pushing Ernie
hard for his place. In Vick Pratt has
an experienced man with a baseball
instinct, who will prove to be an im-
portant cog in his combination. The
most promising outfielders are Perrin
and Genebach, who are almost certain
of their berths, and Roby and Jack
Dunn are battling for the other place.
These are the men that are being used
the most in the practices, but further
t practice during the year may bring to
light other .candidates, who will suc-
ceed in winning a place on the nine.
The Michigan team is by no means a
settled thing, and even the men that
make the Southern trip in a few weeks
may return home to find better players
ready to take their places.
Yesterday afternoon Coach Pratt
warmed his men up early in the after-
noon with batting and fielding drill,
and then set the candidates through a
practice game. For the regulars the

lineup was: Uteritz, third; Van Bov-
en, short; Dunn, center _Ield;' Roby,
left field; 'Genebach, -right field; John-
son, first; Karpus, second; Vick;
Tcatch; Tor~rey, pitch' The Yannigans
lined up as followg: Hoffman, third;
Abbott, second; Shackleford, first;

White, short; Ronan, center field;
Gray, right field; Pearman, left field;
Coates, catch, and Ruzicka, pitch.
Delta Tau -Delta
Lands First In
Fraternity Mee t
Finals in the inter-fraternity track
meet were completed with the excep-
tion of the medley and one lap relays
Tuesday night in the Waterman gym-
nasium. Delta .Upsilon retains the
lead with 18 points but Delta Tau Del-
ta with 16 and 6 more assured in the
relays is certain to win the meet.
McEllven of Delta Upsilon and Dun-
leavy of Sigma Alpha Epsilon are the
greatest point winners. McEllven won
the high and broad jumps and took
second in the pentathlon and high hur-
dles. Dunleavy won the high hurdles,'
took third in the pentathlon and
fourth in the shot-put and low-hurdles.
Phi Gamma Delta and Delta Tau
Delta, who alternated first and second
in the one-lap and medley relay pre-
liminaries, will be featured Saturday
evening in the track meet with Cor-
nell, when they will settle the ques-
tion of first and second.
The summaries:'
Shot put won by Dunphy (Phi Delta
Theta); second, Czysz (Delta Sigma
Delta); third, Eades (Alpha Sigma
Phi); fourth, Dunleavy (Sigma Alpha
Epsilon). 'Distance, 42.3. Lw hurdles
won by Samuel (Phi Sigma Delta);
second, Gessner (Phi Sigma Delta);
third, Hattendorf (Phi Gamma Delta);
fourth, Dunleavy (Sigma Alpha Epsi-
lon). Time, 8:2-5. High hurdles won
by Dunleavy (Sigma Alpha Epsilon);
second, McEllven (Delta Upsilon);
third, Randall (Sigma Nu). Time, 9.2.
High jump won by McEllven (Delta
Upsilon); second, Shannon (Lambda
Chi Alpha); third, Curran (Trigon);
fourth, Hess (Delta Tau Delta), and
Martin (Phi Gamma Delta). Half mile
won by Hattendorf (Phi Gamma Del-
ta); second, Morton (Phylon); third,
Gibson (Delta Upsilon); fourth, Page
(Delta Tau Delta). Four hundred
forty yards won by Martin (Delta Tau
Delta); second, Thomas (Phi Gamma
Delta); third, Taft (Lambda Chi Al-
pha); fourth, Hanselman (Delta Tau
Delta). Time, 55.2. Fifty yard dash
won by Martine (Delta Tau Delta);
second, Rockwell (Sigma Nu); third,
Hanselman (Delta Tau Delta);
fourth, Banks (Theta Chi). Time, 5.4.
No.3
r
WRYYUR U
IF YOU WANT TO
but if you're wise, you'll forget all
your worries after school hours.
Shake off your troubles when the
whistle blows and you shut up your
desk for the day. Come to Huston
Bros. and play a few games of billiards.
No game ever Invented gives more
pleasure and nothing is more restful
than an hour or so spent over a bil-

Bard table.
HUSTON BROS.
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Cigars and Cadies. "
soft rinks and Light Lunhes.
Cigarettes aGd Pipes.
"WETRY TO TREAT YOU RIGH?',

TRACK MEN PRlEP
FOR CORNELL MEET'

RELAY
MEN

AND MIDDLE DISTANCE
HOPE OF WOLVERINES
ON SATURDAY

Waterman gymnasium was aban-
doned by Coach Steve Farrell and the
majority of the Varsity track men
Wednesday afternoon for the more
congenial atmosphere of Ferry field.
Only a few of the middle distance
runners and the high jumpers stayed
.inside under the care of Archie Hahn.
The middle distance men, on whom
much depends in the Cornell meet
Saturday, were given workouts, run-
ning, in most cases, a little over the
regular distance. Burkholder, Michi-
gan's hope in the half mile, worked
out on the wooden track with others
of the relay team..
On the relay team lies much of the
burden of the meet. This will be the
first opportunity that the quartet has
had to run over the home track, and
also the first dual relay since the
Chicago meet. Michigan should have
won the mile relay in the Conference
meet, but crowding on the track while
the race was being run prevented the
smooth team work necessary, and Il-
linois won the event by inches, after
Captain Butler had made up a four
yard handicap. The teams are well
matched, but it is not likely that the
final outcome will be decided by the
result of the relay as was the case
last year.
The loss of Walker in the high jump
will take away Michigan's best chance
for first honors in this event, but, with

Forbes and Platts jumping, the Wol-
verines should take some points.
Outdoors, the shot putting of both
Stipe and Van Orden improved 9p-
preciably. If they are able to do as
well Saturday, first and second will
not be too much to expect. Both of
these men have made great advances
with the 16 pound weight, and Coach
Farrell should have two dangerous
heavers when the outdoors season
opens.
GOLF NOTICE
Applications for membership
in the Ann Arbor Golf club must
be sent in to Commander Faust,
605 Oxford road, accompanied
by a check for $10 for privileges
of the course, before April 3.
In case more than 40 students
apply for membership selections
will be based on the ability of
the player. Past experience and
the club from which the appli-
cant comes should be stated in
the request.

Wrestling Mratches
Draw Mkg Crowds
Great interest is being shown on the
campus in the wrestling tourney
which will come to an end Saturday
afternoon at 4 o'clock in Waterman
gymnasium, when the finals will be
staged. The crowds which have
watched the matches this year have
been greater than ever before, and it
isthoped that by next year a wrestling
coach will le secured and a team
sent to Conference matches.
The last of the semi-finals will be
done away with tomorrow and every-
thing will be ready for the finals Sat-
urday. Keen competition is especially

looked for in the welterweight and
middleweight matches. The winners
will be given loving cups and numer-
als, while the runner-ups will receive
numerals for their work.
Yesterday the Oliver vs. Campbell
match was the only one staged in the
semi-finals. These 158 pounders bat-
tled for five minutes until Campbell
forced his opponent's shoulders to the
mat with a strong body hold. Preced-
ing the main struggle Moffit and
Green, weighing in at 145 pounds,
wrestled for five minutes in an exhi-
bition match, neither man being able
to win a decision.
Nearly 440,000 own a Corona type-
writer. Price $50.00. Easy terms if
desired. O. D. Morrill, 17 Nickel's Ar-
cade.-Adv.

'A

I'I
(,,-
'' f f

TELL THE PORTER TO TAKE
YOUR LUGGAGE
to one of our waiting taxis. That
will 'insure a fine, clean car,
quick service and a very rea-
sonable charge. We meet all
trains arriving and departing.
A phone call will put a good
car with a skillful driver at
your orders for any service you
may require at any hour.
CITY TAXI
PHONE 20

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S U R-A NEW NARRow
ARROW
COLLAR
Ctuett.Peabody &.Co inc.Troy N.Y.

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Get Fitte
Attention Seniors NowtFoe
CAW SNS DeowFor
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POLA

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1593 W.

721 N.U.

Amazingly audacious
She will win you
She will thrill you

"Say

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Laster Flolvers of Quality

Cousins &

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1002 SOUTH UNIVERSITY AVE,

S etspectacle
Onview at the MAJESTIC

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For

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All

Spring $uits
P _i
RFOR YOUNG MEN
If you don't think we've got the right goods
at the right prices, just take a squint at our
window. Tweeds, herringbones 'n every-
thing, with my personal guarantee.
$40.-00 to $75.00
GEO. W. KYER
1593 W. 721 N. U.

w _
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xAnn Arbor's Finest Restaurant
LIKE AKNG LIKE A QUEEN
You Can Dine Here
- Come in, sit down to clean sanitary places, give
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s of minutes, eat the best cooked food in town and
thenpay less.
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$11

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Brogue Oxfords and Shoen
A new type of Brogue-a maore dressy type

With
Novel t,
Stitch

Shirts
Corded Madras $3.00
formerly $5.00
Neckwear
Italian Grenadines $3.00
Silk ties from $1.00 to $1.50
Knitted ties from $1.00 to$2

Caps
English made in Herring-
bones and Tweeds
Fats
New Spring Felts
a fine selection
Dress Gloves
African Cape $4 and $5
A new Spring Silk $2

Davis Toggery Shop
119 South Main St.

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