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March 24, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N DAILY

'99

Cal

atii

14 4L1

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OP MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
rear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
'he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
:ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
;ubscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
)ffices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
hones: Business. 960; Editorial, 2414.
ommunications not to exceed 3o0 words, if signed, the sig-
e not necessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or .mailed to The Daily office.
ned communications will receive no consideration. No man
At will be returned unless the writer incloses postage..
'he Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex
d in the communictions..
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR
Editor .............................Chesser M. Campbell'
Editors--
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T.W. Sargent, Jr
y Editor..................... ... ...A. Bernstein
E.ditor ............f... .."P.Campbell
ials ... ......Lee WoodruL A.Kern, . .Whinery
....... .............. Robert Angell
n's editor..'...:.........:..............'.Mary D. Lane
aph ..................................Thomas De w9
ope .................................... W.e

e Walde
Weber
h Vickery
lark
Reindel
3. Grundy
Oberholtzer
E. Adams
F. Elliott
n MCBain

Assistants
Frank H. McPike
J. A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
Byron Darnton
M. A. Kiaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennover
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward JLmbrecht
Sara Waller
H. S. Howlett

consin twenty to eight. Some six years before this
contest Charles M. Gayley, '76, the author of "The
Yellow and Blue" was responsible for the institu-
tion of football as a Michigan sport and our first
outside game resulted in a defeat for Racine at Chi-
cago in the spring of '79.
Track came into prominence in 1874 and tennis
about six years later, and since that time the realm
of Michigan athletics has been steadily increasing.
Today we have our football, baseball, basketball,
track and-tennis, all highly organized Varsity
sports. Under the category of informal classes of
competition we have any number qf types of athlet-
ics. There is soccer, hockey, swimming, boxing and
wrestling, and now, since the establishment of the
intramural department back in 1913, this list has
been increased to include a number of other forms
of competition-- even the cricket of the days of '49.
It used to be that only a few men were partici-
pating in athletic training at the University, those
few being members of the various teams. With the
large number of sports in which it is now possible
for us to take part, the realm has been extended un-
til by the end of this year estimates show that a
total of about 3,500 men on the campus will have
been engaged during the two semesters in some
sort of athletics. The figures show that we are rap-
idly coming to the point where there will be full op-
portunity for every man to join in some sort of
physical sport and where it will be highly desirable
for him to do so. The organization of sports has
made for better college and intercollegiate spirit;
the work of the intramural department has made for
ail increase in interclass competition under organized
methods and a tendency toward more inclusiveness
regarding those whom the sports may benefit phys-
ically. Certainly the trend of the years is for the
better and should be encouraged by the University
and the student body.
A TOAST TO THE CAPTAIN
To Captain-elect Bud Rea - a crack shot, a stal-
wart guard, and a popular player who will have
the whole team with him - Michigan extends her
good right hand in admiration for his part in the
fight to a championship tie this year, and in a prom-
ise of whole-hearted support while he is re-instill-
ing the wonderful spirit of '21 in the Maize and
Blue squad of '22.'
It is to be hoped that the efficient organization.of
the University police will be on hand to prevent any
Sinn Fein demonstrations at this year's Irish opera.
"Gas last Hurls Students Out College Win-
dows" - says a Free Press headline. Let this be
a lesson to you, professors.
The Telescope

G

R

A

H

A NEW SHIPMENT OF
EXERCISES IN CURRENT ECONOMICS- Hamilton
AT
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920-
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited anid Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two V ' The TurkishC
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m. * -
and ever two hours to 9:00pin.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only, !. . . - _" . '
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m., ande
12:10 p.m.

A

M

S

6
13,
20
27

MARCH
MT W T
1 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30 31

F
4
11
18
25

12
19
26

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
USINESS MANAGER............LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
dvertising .. ................-T.. .... .... .-o-Dce
lassifieds.......................... -..--...S. Kunstadter
ublication.. ................::::... . M. Heath
ccounts .................................... . E. R. Priehs
rCutation ................................ V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
J. J. Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robrtson M. S. Goldring
P. H. Hutchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
. A. Cross R. G. Burcell W. Cooley
Robt. L. Davis A. J, Parker
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
sue of The Daily should sa the night editor, who has full charge
f all news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 1921.
Night Editor-J. E. MMANIS.
BETTER CLASS ORGANIZATION
With the coming of spring, bringing with it
ioughts of commencement and of the subsequent
eparture of the senior class from the University,
te question of permanent class organization should
e a vital one. There are too many associations
ade in college which all too soon are lost after
e sheepskins are given out and the last good-byes
*e said.
Alumni reunions are a difficult thing at best to
:hieve, and at Michigan, they are not made as
uch of as in some of the Eastern colleges; sim-
y because as a. rule the graduating classes are
rger and consequently more difficult to assemble
:,any one time. At present, we have sorpe hun-
-ed and forty alumni associations, fully organized
id scattered thro ghout the different cities of the
>untry. But even these cannot do what a full or-
nization, made before each senior class leaves col-
ge, might achieve..
At a meeting to be held when all the Seniors may
present, and when University spirit is uppermost
their minds, plans might be carefully made for
unions, organizations perfected, and the difficulty
many' letters and communications at least to
me extent done away with.
It is all too easy to forget the happy associations
college days in the world outside. How great an
lvance it would be if in the perfection of the
umni organizations of each senior class, provision
ight be made for keeping up the 'old class spirit
Ld for such a handling of reunions as would
ake them more interesting, highly enjoyable affaits
all concerned.
OUR GROWING ATHLETICS
"Athletics," backin the days of '49, "were not
gularly organized, nor had we any gymnasium.
re played baseball, wicket ball, two old cat, etc., but
ere was no football nor any trained 'teams.
here was mere extempore volunteering." Such
the description the president of that year's class
ves of the athletic situation in his time.
When we compare the number of unorganized
rms of sport then-in vogue with the present highly
veloped system of intercollegiate competition we
n realize what a tremendous change has taken
ace in the athletic side of the University's affairs.
those early days there was no thought of organ-
d sport whatever. They had foot races, wood
wing contests, and so on, all entirely impromptu
character. But who nowadays would volunteer
r a wood sawing meet?
Cricket was first organized as a sport in 786o
th an appropriation from the Regents of fifty
llars for a cricket field. But even after that it ap-
ars that most of the sports of the day were inter-
ss and proceeded helter skelter. Football was
aducted entirely along interclass lines and no
lit was set on the number who might compete.
le result was mob rule with all the men on a side
t each class could muster, and the whole affair
[st have resembled our underclass spring games.
But the first real athletic organization of any per-
nent kind came in the days of the Civil war when
ieball became a collegiate sport. In 1882, in our
t intercollegiate game, Mithigan defeated Wis-

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look Just like new, wear Just as
long and save] you five to ten
dollars: We do only high class
work. Factory "lat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

BASE BALL
GET INTO
THE GAME
WrrH
SPALDING
EQUIPMENT
GLOVES, MITTS,
BATS, BALLS, ETC;.
O'.r entaligie now readp.
An C. SPADING & BROS.
211 S& State St., Chioago,III

L

Mail Orders

'I

Phone Orders
Promptly Filled

The sweetest words of thot or pen:
The price of board has dropped again.

Mail Orders
Promptly Filled
EST. 1857

MAN COMMITS SUICIDE BY JUMPING
FROM BROOKLYN BRIDGE -news head.
We suppose the coroner's jury brought in a ver-
dict that his death was due to dropsy.
Dear Noah
The ignorance of many college men and women is
simply appalling. One professor, I think, summed
the matter up well when he said "they are much
better fed than taught." How do you explain
this? Prof. B
We can't explain this, Professor, unless it be be-
cause the faculty teaches them, while they feed
themselves.
The other day in English lit t
The prof asked us our impression
Of Chaucer.
And after a little careful thinking
On the subject we told him that it
Was our impression that Chaucer would
Have been a mighty poor man to have at
A spelling bee.
And after we found out the mark
Our prof gave us we wished we hadn't
Been so waggish.
We thank you.-
a ~. -
"Unless the national government retains Califor-
nia in its anti-Japanese activities, relations between
Japan and the United States will get worse and
worse, and the fault will be mostly ours." - From
my favorite Daily.
We suppose we'll have to retain it all right, even
though many who have heard the Native Sons talk-
in about the climate of their state are convinced
that we should make Mexico take it back.
A Real Essential
First co-ed-Have you read Kant?
Second ditto-No, but I've read "DON'T" for
girls.
?7 ? ?? ?
Apparatus examinations for freshmen and sopho-
mores will be held at the regular class hour April 4,
5, 7 and 8.
- From the Women's Column of the Daily.
Fzamous Closing Line
"Carrying a joke too far," he muttered as he
saw the student who had come over a mile to bring
in some Gargoyle contributions.
NOAH COUNT.

11 1 IrYI I l ls

65th Easter

Sale

Coats

Suit,

S

'Dresses

I

$25

$25

rI

For the remaining days of this week and for the first three days in next
week, we are offering several lots of coats, suits and dresses at $25. This is
really an unheard of opportunity to purchase your Easter clothes, without very
great expense to you. The dresses are new and lovely; exemplifyingas they
do the new style tendencies, with flaring lines and bright colors for trimming.
Brown seems to be the best color this spring and Canton crepe the best ma-
terial, although grey follows a close second and taffeta of course is good.
These frocks have' the wide skirts, many with circular overskirts, tightfitting,
basque like'waists and cunning little puffed sleeves. Colors are navy, Harding
blue, grey, brown, bisque and henna. Trimmings consist-of ribbon, flowers,
embroidery, beads, and pipings of bright colored silk. At'$25, they are a real
bargain.
The suits are just as jaunty as you could wish. The box coat is coming
into its own this spring and is so becoming to youthful figures. Strictly tailored
models are here, also, if they are more becoming to you. The ripple coat is
emery pretty and is shown quite extensively. Embroidery, beads and sashes
of wide ribbon trim these suits and colors are navy, grey or tweed mixtures.
You will be more than pleased with these suits at $25.
Two styles of coat are here, the semi-wrap style, sometimes verging on
the cape, and the sport model. Either is very good this season and many
models in both styles are here' at this price. Large cape collars, loose sleeves
and fancy stitching make these coats distinctive, while the sport coats are
regulation sport models with patch pockets, fancy belts and large buttons.
If you had been planning for new clothes this spring and yet wished to
economize this is your chance.

i
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(SECOND FLOOR)

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