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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

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OFF'ICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-.
y year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this. paper and the local news published therein.
,Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ass matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Office": Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 966; Editorial, 24x4.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ure not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
h, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
"signed communications will reeeie no consideration. No man-
ript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does .pot necessarily endorse the, sentiments ex-
-sed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after g o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
LNAGING EDITOR.............GEORGE O. BROPHY, JR.
ws Editor.................-.........Chesser M. Campbell
ght Editors-
T. II. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. A. Bewtstein J. E. McManis
B. P. Campbell '. W. Sargent, Jr.
J. I. Dakin
itorials.........Lee Woodruff, Robert Sage, C. H. Murchison
rts......................Robert Angel
sistant News........ .......... E. P. Lovejoy
omen's Editor...............................MaryD. Lane
egraph ...................... ............. West Gallogly
Assistants
wphine Waldo Thomas J. Whinery Harry B. Grundy
ul G. Weber R. W. Wrobleski Winefred Biethan
nena Barlow George Reindel Robert D. Sage
zabeth Vickery Dorothy Monfort Marion Nichols
E. Clarkc Minnie Muskatt Frances Oberholtzer

W_ i

Az. Ia

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
[SINESS MANAGER........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.

w

tising..................... D. P. Joyce
its and Classified Ads ....................J- .W.Rawlings
cationt ........ . .. ....( F. . M. Heath
nts............-----.----.---....-......... R. Priehs
ulation ...................- - -.........C P. Schneider
Assistants
V. Lanbreeht B. G. Gower Lester W. Millard
rt 0. Kerr Sigund Kurnstadter V. F. Hillery
he night editors for this week will be: Monday
t, Hugh Hitchcock; Tuesday night, T. W.
gent, Jr.; Wednesday ''ight, B. P. Campbell;
rsday night, T. H. Adams; Friday night, J. I.
:in; Saturday night, John E. McManis.

persons wishing to secure information concerning news for ay
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be prirted that night.
"SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1920.
LOWELL ON EXAMINATIONS
Michigan's student body would have liked to
hear the address which President A. Lawrence
Lowell oif Harvard nade at the banquet of educa-
tional conference delegates Friday evening. Not
only would Dr. Lowell's fame as an educator have
drawn a large audience of the more serious minded
among the student body, but, looking at the mat-
ter iin retrospect, one reading of the 'text of the ad-.
dress convinces that no speech of the entire con-
ference, aside from the inaugration, would so have
riveted student attention. For Dr. Lowell talked
about examinations-a subject which gets under
the student's epidermis the minute it is mentioned.
"Most of our examinations are adapted to as-
certain little except knowledge, which tends to pro-
mote mere cramming; whereas the tests in the
great school of active life depend rather upon the
ability to use information," said Dr. Lowell; and
every student who has struck the sad experience
of failure to retain, and inability to apply knowl-
edge will 'agree with him. Most students today
realize that two functions of the University are to
train the mind to think, and fund it with a stoie
of positive information as the. material of that
thinking. But the football star who has been pam-
pered and "slid through" high school to rue his
lack of the fundamentals later, and the all-A man
who finds that his mind is a storeroom without
transportation facilities, are merely the extremes
among many types who will welcome any effort to
bring the educational system of America to the
more perfect realization of those two functions.
If a change in "the mechanical process of
credit" given in high schools, plus research in the
art of examinations, will in the end enable Ameri-
can undergraduates to grasp more successfully the
problems of the classroom, and prepare them more
thoroughly for "the real thing" later on, the na-
tion's educators may be sure that their work along
these lines is going to receive the co-operation and
appreciation of student bodies everywhere.
TO DAILY PATRONS
Although confronted with a twenty-five per cent
increase it student subscriptions alone, in addition
to the inevitable difficulties in getting under way
encountered by any enterprise serving nearly four
thousand individuals directly, The Michigan Daily
is rapidly reducing causes of circulation complaints
to a minimum. At this time, however, The Daily
staff wishes to express its appreciation of the pa-
tience exercised by those of its patrons, who, due
to almost 'unavoidable causes, have failed to re-
ceive their copies regularly at the beginning of the
school year.
It is the aim of The Daily to make its circula-
tion service perfect. In pursuance of this policy
all reported omissions of delivery are followed un-
til correction is assured. But before reporting the
failure of your paper to appear, please make sure
that no non-subscriber has taken it, as a large share
of the complaints registered turn out to be due to
this rather than omission in delivery.

CURRENT HISTORY
Speaking before the educational conference in
Hil auditorium Thursday afternoon, Professor
Williston Walker, Ph.D., Provost of Yale univer-
sity, stressed the fact that students should lave
college with a thorough working knowledge of
everyday political and industrial problems that face
the world, and the lamentable fact that usually they
do not graduate with that knowledge.
The university can and does offor its courses in
Economics, Political Science, Sociology and kin-
dred subjects, but it can only attempt to inculcate
the fundamental structure of these broad sub-
jects, leaving to the student the application of the-
ory to practical problems. Professor Walker in his
address sought to find a way in which the univer-
sity could divert the interest of students to these
current problems that are being faced now and that
will be faced for years to come. That interest
should come not only from the Lits, the Laws and
the Business Ads among us, but also from the En-
gineers, the Medics, the Scientists and the stu-,
dents of every branch of learning in the Univer-
sity.
The only hope to be seen, Provost Walker ad-
mitted, was an intelligent awakening of the stu-
dents to what is going on in the world outside. To-
day one of the most momentous presidential cam-
paigns in the history of the country is in progress;
today the United States is looking upon a gigantic
social struggle between capital and labor; today ele-
ments unknown till now are entering into our na-
tional life, yet liow much do we, the students, know
of these?
This sort of knowledge is not to be brought to
us by professors, nor is it the stuff of text-books.
It is to be found in intelligent conversation, in the
pages of -current history, in the best newspapers
and magazines.
THE RULES-OF THE GAME
No doubt the term tradition means very little
to the average freshman who comes to a great uni-
versity with only a rather hazy idea in his mind
as to what university life really means. Possibly
,the freshman pot seems to him a foolish kind of
headgear; while the fact that he is neither allowed
to smoke a pipe on the campus, sit on the senior
benches, carve his name in gaudy lettering on the
tap room tables among those of departed seniors,
nor do a thousand and one things he sees other
students doing, grates on his nerves merely' as a
bit of foolish and ratheraunfair domination.
But traditions are all a part of the preparatory
life of the University. We chose Michigan as a
college of things worth while, as a university which
possessed ideals and the sort of spirit which tradi-
tions engender. If we are to become a part of such
a school we must obey its dictates and follow the
path which others have done before us to become
true Michigan men.
Class of '24, be sportsmen; for your own sake
and that of the University, obey the rules of the
game.
The Telescope
Owed to the School of Music
A maid named' Elizabeth King,
Dropped dead while attempting to sing,
Then the staff next door,
Whom her songs had made sore,
Bowed heads and said, "Death, where's thy
sting?"
His Skirts Were Clear
The instructor in English history was a per-
sonage of imposing mien and awe-inspiring man-
ner. Regarding the class sternly he asked:
"Who signed the Magna Charta ?" Then, receiv-
ing no response, he centered his attention on a meek
little frosh in the back seat and repeated his ques-
tion, "Young man, will you tell me who signed the
Magna Charta ?"
The poor frosh gulped a few times and then fin-

ally in a quavering voice he mangaed to stutter:
"I don't know, sir, but I know I didn't have any-,
thing to do with it."
Dear Noah:
I was reading in history the other day where
Alexander the Great always had from twenty to
thirty court jesters around him. What do you
suppose was the reason for this? Student.
We don't know unless it was that Alexander fig-
ured that it was a good plan to always have your
wits about you.
They Had Been Engaged But One Short Week
"Can you recall the happiest moment of your life,
George ?" she shyly asked.
"Yes, indeed," he responded quickly.
"And was it lately?" she queried with bated
breath.
"Yes, indeed, darling, only last week," he an-
swered, a tender smile playing around the corner
of his lips.
"Oh, George," she said ecstatically, "you don't
know how happy your saying this makes me."
"And do you know, darling," he continued in a
hushed, reminiscent tone, "when I went into that
pot with a pair of deuces I hadn't the least idea in
the world that I'd win it."
Famous Closing Lines
"Brushing her heir," he muttered as he saw the
mother whipping her son with a hairbrush.
NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 15, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9:10 p. M.
Liniteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. ,EXx-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. ni., and
12: 10 p.m.
OCTOBER
S M T W T F S
1 2
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinishedtand re-
blocked with all new trinmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hit Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

999

TAXI

999

4
a"

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service
enough said

999

TAXI

999

.flltlllilllnlu 111 flt1~ 1 11 u 11t lli 1ll lt l11It#Itlill lllt~tl
w- w
Pennants' Pictures
Banners Laundry boxs & bags
w Blankets Oilcloth B
Pillows 5"'uslin_
J'emory Vooks Towels and a
hook.Lnds full line of gift
Sheets and novelties
Pillow cases
DARLING & MALLEAUX
224-226 SOUTH STATE STREET 7 NICKELS ARCADE
ma mmml-Imt1lmmlm mmm1l11in lfmfltmtlla -Ilfll mlf1

Gabrilowitsch

All-Chopin Recital - Matinee Musicale Course
Tuesday, Oct. 19. Pattengill Auditorium

Course Tickets
$2.50

Single Admission For Club Members
$1.50 $2.00

Tickets now on sale at Graham's and Wahr's Book Stores.

(The Concert Committee is indebted to Mr. Graham for the use of this space)

1

L .1

1,

CHEMISTRY COATS

HOSPITAL COATS

MULLISON'S
RIDING"
STABLES
Saddle Horses
By the Hour

DENTISTRY COATS
OVERALLS AND COVERALLS
Waist Aprons, Bib Aprons, Rubber
Aprons, Class Toques, Freshman Caps
Parcel Post Laundry Boxes
-j
Clothing, Furnishings and Hats
Ayres and Smith Caps

ALSO

Driving Horses
Single and Double Rigs
326 EAST AN4 STREET

Wadhams &C.

ANN ARBOR,
MICH.

TwO COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

I

4J

! _

I,.-

Headquarters for Students Wants
Starrett's Inside and Outside Calipers
This week-90c each
Plumb Machinists' Hammers, 6-inch steel rules,
2-foot brass-bound rules, Nail sets, Blue Crayon,
Pocket Knives, Yale Padlocks
Wallace Electric Study Lamps, Electric Fixtures
Auto Strop, Gillette and other safety razors
All Makes Safety Razor Blades Sharpened
Only Hardware Near the Campus
Telephone 1610

i
i
i
I

Prices Right

- Service Prompt

M. D. LARNED
310 S. STATE ST.
State Street Hardware

U

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