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October 17, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-17

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SECTION
ONE

Ab
r .4ij tr t an

4Iatt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT RIRE
SERVICE

J

VOL. XXXI. No. 12. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

BRITISH MINERS
STRIKE: COUNTRY
SYMPATHETIC STRIKE MAY BE
CALLED BY OTHER
WORKERS
PREMIER LLOYD GEORGE
TO DISCUSS SITUATION

Port Officials Expect All
to Be Tied Up in
Week

ShippingI

London, Oct. 16. - With 1,000,000
miners out of the pits tonight, thou-
sands of dock workers and industrial
workers already out of employment
as a consequence, and the transport
workers and railroad men called to
meet soon to .discuss a sympathetic
strike, Great Britain faces one of the
greatest industrial upheavals in its
history, in the opinion of labor and
political leaders who discussed the
situation today.
Reports from all industrial centers
tonight are not reassuring, while port
officials say that shipping will be
tied up within a week. The most
hopeful message came from Sheffield,
where it is believed there is enough
coal to last three weeks. At other
centers one week's supply is the
limit.
It is indicated tonight that Premier
Lloyd George will not take a hand in
the matter before Tuesday, when Par-
liament meets, and undoubtedly will
discuss the situation. No disturbanc-
es are reported as a result of the
strike.
The statement that the men struck
against the advice of most of their
leaders was confirmed to some ex-
tent by the attitude of many who left
the pits. It was said that the miners
had not understood the questions be-
forehand -when they voted on a
strike. In South Wales the miners
federation has been called to meet
next Friday to recommend that if the
strike is not settled by'Oct. 30, the
pumpmen and other employes remain-
ing at wrk should be called out.
PRESIDENT BURTON SPEAKS
BEFORE CRAFTSMEN'S CLUB
President Marion L. Burton ad-
dressed the first meeting of the
Craftsmen's club Saturday evening at
the Michigan Union on the function
the club could fulfill in campus life.
Other speakers were Registrar Ar-
thur G. Hall, Treasuser Robert Camp-
bell, Paul Eaton; '21, president of the
Michigan Union, and Rev. Lloyd C.
Douglas.
The next meeting of the club will
be held Saturday evening, Oct. 23, at
8 o'clock, at the Masonic Lodge
rooms, corner of Main and Huron
streets.
ILLINOIS DEFEATS IOWA
* 20 TO S, IN LAST QUARTER
Urbana, Oct. 16.-Illinois strength-
ened its chances for the Conference
grid championship and virtually elim-1
inated Iowa from the race today, by1
cutting the Iowa line at will and de-
feating the Hawkeyes 20 to 3. The
Illni, last year's title winners, used
only straight football tactics, while
Iowa unearthed a brilliant array of
trick formations, especially in the
last two minutes of play when the
losers battled desperately.
PHYLON STANDING PUBLISHED
INCORRECTLY; IS NOW SECOND
In the compiling of the academic
standing of the fraternities, as indi-
cated in a chart published by Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall, the position of
Phylon was given incorrectly.:
Phylon should stand at 74.3 per
cent, giving it the rank of second
among the men's local house clubs.
BALTIMORE WINS MINOR TITLE
FROM ST. PAUL, SCORE 1 TO 0
St. Paul, Minn., Oct. 16.-The Balti-
more international league club today
won the minor league championship
by defeating St. Paul of the American
association 1 to 0 in an exceptionally

hard fought game.
THE WEATHER g
Fair and Cooler Today

FIRST CHIMES OUT
ON CAMPUS MONDAY
Chimes, the University literary
magazine, makes its appearance on
the campus Monday for the first time
this year. In it are to be articles
of unusual merit written by promin-
ent men, alumni, and students.
There will be a story of the Olymp-
ic games, illustrated by photographs,
by Carl Johnson, four articles of gen-
eral interest as football, traditions, ad-
visory system, and campus activities.
President Marion L~. Burton has writ-
ten a special article for this number.,
"Ghosts on the Campus," written by
a former editor of Collier's, will oc-
cupy a prominent place. A 3,000 word
short story and the first instalment
of a serial which is to run throughout
the year will be featured.
New departments of book reviews,
exchanges and a new series of front-
ispieces, poems and editorials will
make their debut.
"More subscriptions will be neces-
sary if Chimes is to survive," said a
member of the staff. That Chimes is
making a real effort to put out a mag-
azfne which is worthy of unstinted
praise on the campus was the purport
of a staff member's article.
UNION PLANS SPECIL
TRAIN FOR 0.5o U.AME
GUARANTEES 400 PASSENGERS TO
UNION; MANY MORE EX-
PECTED TO GO
Michigan rooters for the Michigan-
Ohio State game, Nov. 6, will have a
special train if arrangements now be-
ing made by the Union committee ap-
pointed for the purpose of obtaining
the special from railroad officials are
completed.
Plans now being formulated will
have the train leave Ann Arbor at 7
-o'clock the Saturday morning of the
game, arrive at Columbus about 12:30
o'clock and leave there early in the
morning of the following day, prob-
ably around 2 o'clock. A guarantee
of 400 passengers has been made by
the Union to the railroad officials and
it is expected that there will be no
trouble in filling the guarantee, ac-
cording to Donald Thorpe, '21, chair-
man of the committee in charge.
The regular fare for the trip is
$13.50 round trip, but the Union is
trying to obtain special rates for the
excursion and will know Monday or
Tuesday concerning the decision.
According to the present plans,
there will be no slepers, all the cars

CLASS ELECTIONS
HELD THIS WEEK
Freshman Lits First Class to Meet
to Select Officers for
Year

BALLOTING TO TAKE
SOON AFTER
Meetings for the elec
officers, comprising a pr
president, secretary and
the various classes of t
the University will take

ning the first of this week. The
schedule of the meetings of the class-
es for the nomination of their officers
is given below.
Lit Classes First
The meetings for nomination of of-
ficers will start with the freshman lit-
erary class on Monday, immediately
after the assembly for the talks to
freshmen by President Marion L. Bur-
ton in Hill auditorium. Senior lits
will meet at 3 o'clock on Tuesday in
room 205, Mason hall. Junior lits
will meet at 4 o'clock on Tuesday also
in room 205, Mason hall. Sophomore
lits will meet at 3 o'clock on Wednes-
day in room 205, Mason hall. The elec-
tions in the literary college will be
held shortly after the meetings for
nomination and will take place by
ballot in University hall. Full an-
nouncements will appear in The
Daily.
Election of officers in the various
classes in the Law school will come
the first of this week. The announce-
ments for these meetings will appeal
on the bulletin board in the Last
building.
Medical Elections This Week
Also in the Medical school the elec-
tions will take place the first of this
week and announcements for the
meetings of the classes will appear on
the bulletin board in the Medical
building.
Meetings for the elections in the
engineering college will take place ac-
cording to the following schedule:
Seniors at, 5 o'clock on Monday in
room 348 of the Engineering building.
Juniors at 5 o'clock on Tuesday in the
same room. Sophomores at 5 o'clock
on Thursday also in the same room,,
and freshmen at 5' o'clock on Wednes-
day also in room 348 of the Engineer-
ing building.
COEDUCATION FAVORED
BY HOLYOKE DELEGATE

PLACE
SELECTION;
tion of class;
resident, vice-
ttreasurer, in
he schools in
place begin-!

AUTO VICTIM TO
REUOV14R, IS HOPE
The condition of Elzabeth Carter,
'23, who was injured Thursday aft-
ernoon in the automobile accident
that caused the death of George A.
Cadwell, Jr., '21L, was reported yes-
terday afternoon as being little chang-
ed. However, no crisis is expected
and serious results are not being
looked for, according to a statement
issued from St. Joseph sanitarium last
night.
Miss Carter's mental condition was
reported as being much improved,
and it was stated that the terrific
mental shock of the aocident was
gradually wearing off. She has not
yet been told of Cadwell's death and
all visitors are being instructed to
keep the news from her, for it is
feared that the shock would cause a
relapse.
Funeral services for Cadwell were
held at 11 o'clock yesterday morning
in the Phi Alpha Delta house. Rev.
Lloyd Douglas conducted them. Pres-
ident Burton attended. A member of
Phi Alpha Pelta and another from
Delta Tau Delta left yesterday to ac-
company the remains to West Hart-
ford, Conn., where the burial will be
held.
Miss Carter's parents arrived in
Ann Arbor from Huntington, W. Va.,
yesterday afternoon.
GIRLS115MANDOLIN CLUB
TO BEGIN SECOND YEAR

DAILY PRICES RISE
Effective today's issue, the
price of individual copies of The
Michigan Daily will be five
cents instead of three cents,
which has hitherto been the sale
price.
Subscriptions are still being
taken at The Daily office, the
$3.50 rate for both local and for-
eign subscriptions being in ef-
fect until December.

VARSITY STARTS SLOWLY,
COUNTS FOUR SCORES
IN LAST HALF

BUT

Illinois Defeats Iowa, 20
Hard Game at
Urbana

to 8, in

WOLVERINE LINEMEN AND BACKFIELD
COOEAEIN OVER WHELMING DEFEAT
OF MICHIGAN AGGIE ELEVEN; 35-0

MICHIGAN FORWARDS
HOLD FARMERS DOWN

PROFESSIONAL COACII WILL
ENGAGED TO DIRECT
REHEARSALS

BE

THINKS WOMEN'S
SERVE USEFUL
POSE

COLLEGES
PUR.

being day coaches. If enough women
indicate that they will go, arrange-
ments will be made to have certain
of the coaches designated as entirely
for women.
Last year Ohio State sent more than
2,000 rooters to the game here and the
committee hopes that Michigan will at
least approach this number.
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Illinois 20, Iowa 3.
Ohio State 17, Purdue 0.
Indiana 21, Minnesota 0.
Wisconsin 27, Northwestern 7.
Harvard 38, Williams 0.
Princeton 34, Washington and Jef-
ferson 0.
Pennsylvania 7, Lafayette 0.
Brown 14, Colgate 0.
Pittsburgh 7, Syracuse 7.
Boston college 21, Yale 13.
Columbia 20, Amherst 7.
Army 27, Springfield 7.
Dartmouth 27, Holy Cross 14.
Maryland 27, Washington 0.
Tufts 7, Norwich 0.
0. S. U. WINS FROM PURDUE, 17
TO 0, AT STRAIGHT FOOTBALL
Columbus, Oct. 16.-Ohio State won
its first Conference game of the sea-
son this afternoon, defeating Purdue
17 to 0. Purdue at times fought the
Buckeyes to a standstill but lacked
the necessary punch to climax their
efforts. The Buckeyes solved the
much vaunted shift of the Boilermak-
ers in the first period and put over
the first score by a clever 15 yard
pass. Ohio's second touchdown came
in the fourth -quarter and was pre-
ceded by an aerial attack that car-
ried the Buckeyes to the two-yard
line, where Weaver went over .

''I, personally, am a great believer
in coeducational institutions, being
a product of such a school myself,"
said Prof. Ellen C. Minsdale, of Mount
Holyoke college, yesterday, "but I
think, with one of our speakers at the
conference, that there is need for
every type of college and school and
each has its advantages."
Professor Hinsdale is a former Ann
Arbor woman, whose father was a
professor in the University, where
she received her M.A. degree. While
here for the conference she is the
guest of her uncle, Dean W.)3B. Hins-
dale, of theHomoeopathic Medical
college.
"Thesuperiority of the University
education comes from contacts with
members of other colleges and the
broad knowledge thus gained," she
said. "The small woman's college has
the advantage of more direct relation-
ship between teacher and student and
the close friepdships arising from as-
sociations in the small institution."
UNION REGISTRATION AOURS
NOW INCLUDE SATURDAY, 10-12
Beginning this week. new registra-
tion hours will be observed at the
Union. The hours will be from 3 to
5 o'clock Tuesday and Thursday aft-
ernoons, and from 10 to 12 o'clock
Saturday. The latter hours were es-
pecially arranged for the accommoda-
tion of medical students who cannot
come at any other time during the
week. Heretofore the registration
hours were from 2 to 5 o'clock each
week day afternoon except Saturday.
The registration is not yet as large as
it should be, Union officials say, and
they urge all upperclassmen and life
members who have not already regis-
tered to do so at once.

With co-operation with the Glee
club as a feature of its program forI
this winter, the University Girls'1
Mandolin club will begin its secondl
year on the campus. It will appear
with the Glee club at all concerts
and on the trip. A professional coacht
will direct the rehearsals.
Last year the Mandolin club was
founded as an independent organiza-
tion, and made its first appearance in
the Cosmopolitan club Jamboree. It1
met once a week during the year, anda
having acquired a good foundation,
the club will now begin to work in
partnership with the Glee club.
Try-outs for new members will be-
gin at 4:30 o'clock Monday, and will
be continued at 4:30 o'clock Tuesday,
and 7:30 o'clock Wednesday, in room
305 University hall. There is need
for new players, and all girls who can'
play mandolins, banjos, and guitars
are urged by Bernice Frazier, '22,
student leader of the club, to try out.
MICHIGAN GOLFERS
TO ENTER TOURNEY
J. N. Gilchrist and W. H. Ingham
have been selected to represent Mich-
igan in the Conference Golf tourna-
ment to be held at the Olympia Field
Country club, Chicago, Oct. 22 and
23. The two Wolverine representa-
tives topped the list of golfers who
have been playing on the green for
the past two weeks. Scores in the
72 hole match play against bogey
have been very good considering the
hard green. The following are the
scores of the first five golfers: Gil-
christ, 1 up on bogey; Ingham, 2 down
on bogey; Welch, 7 down; Winters,
10 down ; Bennett, 14 down.
All Conference schools will be rep-
resented by teams with the possible
exception of Minnesota and Indiana.
These universitiesthave as yet failed
to enter players. The course at Olym-
pia Field Country club is one 'of the
best in the mid-west and the tourna-
ment on this green will initiate golf
as a Conference sport.
STUDENTS MUST SEE ROOM
COMMITTEE BEFORE MOVING
Students wishing to move from
their present rooming quarters were
again reminded in a warning issued
yesterday by the committee on rooms
that they must see that committee be-
fore any changes are made.
If students wish to move to other
rooms for any reason, the University
ruling provides that they must have
permission of the committee appoint-
ed by the University officials to settle
rooming disputes. This committee
meets for the next time in room 302
of the Union from 2 to 3:30 o'clock
Monday afternoon.

.
REGENTS LUNCHEONi
ENDS CONFERENCE;
Future of Educational System Lies int
Better Salaries for Teachers,
Says Sommerst
HAV4OND SHOWS OUTSIDE
WORK DOES NOT PAY STUDENTS
The educatilonal conference closed
at noon yesterday with a luncheon in
the Michigan Union for the represen-
tative regents. During the morning
they discussed the tasks confronting
them as the governing boards of
state universities. Charles L. Som-
mers, regent of the University of
Minnesota, considered the salary
problem, and Theodore M. Hammond,
regent of the University of Wiscon-
sin, addressed the meeting on stu-
dent fees and tuition charges.
Salaries Too Low
"Figures compiled by the national
bureaus of Education and Labor,"
Regent Sommers said, "prove that
teachers' salaries are inadequate, that
the whole profession, as compared
with trades, vocations, and profes-
sions generally, is underpaid.
"Stories of great distress are cur-
rent on every campus-stories of ill
health and sickness caused by lack
of proper food; of families of teach-
ers at whose table the luxury of but-
ter is unknown; where entertain-
ments, unless free, gre tabooed;
where the price of domestic service
of any sort is prohibitory. Briefly
stated, the situation is this: Either
salaries must go up or go down.
"The question goes beyond that of
mere help to the oollege teacher. The
future of the educational system of
the country is involved. Perhaps
much of some of the inferior quality
of some of the teaching that we have
today is directly traceable to the
strain and worry on the part of the
teachers over their own personal fi-
nances," he concluded.
That students who work their way
through college do not achieve the
succes in after life attained by others,
and that they would do better to bor-
row money from established loan
funds was the theory advanced by
Regent Hammond, speaking on "Stu-
dent Fees and Tuition."
Fees Should Be Low
From investigation of the careers
of more than 3,000 students to whom
he had furnished employment, Re-
gent Hammond drew the conclusion
that "the aided student has not suc-
ceeded in after life to the same ex-
tent as has the student whose way was
paid by parents or friends. His
health has not been so good, and he
has been lacking in initiative and in
accomplishment."
Regent Hammond declared that
university fees and tuition charges
should be as low as possible, al-
thongh the state university has the
right to impose reasonable fees on
all, and particularly to exact special
fees from non-resident students.

Michigan overwhelmed M. A. C. 35
o 0 in a game replete with thrills and
ood football yesterday on Ferry
feld. The Varsity looked like.a dif-
erent team from that which partici-
ated in the Case contest a week
go.
The work of the line was particu-
arly pleasing, as it was that depart-
nent which appeared weak in the first
:ame of the season. Despite the fact
hat the day was just as hot as that
f the Case game, the linemen were
.ull of fight from the first whistle to
he last.
Backs Look Good
The backfield looked good also. Jack
Perrin was the biggest ground gain-
r for the Varsity, although Dunn,
'hhn, Usher and Steketee all did their
hare of advancing the ball. The .
blocking and tackling of the backs was
ilso encouraging. Most of the long
runs which were made were due
more to the fine blocking of the other
backfield men than to any particular-
ly brilliant work on the part of the
runner. Nelson, who played fullback
the first half, was unable to gain
much ground, but he was an invalu-
able aid to his mates in warding off
opposing tacklers.
Michigan was slow in getting un-
der way, making but a single touch-
down in the first half. In the third
and fourth quarters, however, the Var-
sity showed to better advantage, and
seemed to gain almost at will. The
first score came when Jack Perrin
went through right tackle across the
coal line. Wieman kicked goal.
Penalties Frequent
In the second quarter Michigan lost
much through penalties and was un-
Ohle to put over another touchdown,
lthough the half ended with the ball
n M. A. C.'s possession on their own
two-yard line.
The Varsity began with a rush the
second half, Ed. Usher skirting left
end for a touchdown at the very out-
,et. Soon after Jack Dunn attempt-
ed a field goal from the 25-yard line
which went wide. Cohn, who went in
for Perrin, made the third touchdown
toward the close of the quarter when
he ran 20 yards through an open field
for a score. Steketee again kicked
goal.
Two more touchdowns came in the
ourth quarter, the first being made
in a plunge by Jack Dunn and the
second by Ed. Usher. The gaie end-
ed with the ball on M. A. C.'s one-
yard line.
The score is not a fair indicator of
the way in which the Farmers were
outclassed. Michigan gained 410
yards from scrimmage to M. A. C.'s
67, and the Wolverines made 15 first
downs from scrimmage to the Ag-
gies' one. M. A. C. made three other
first downs by reason of penalties.
The Varsity put up a fine defense
against the forward pass, as is shown
by the fact that of 10 M. A. C. passes
five were intercepted and five were
incomplete.: Michigan only tried one ,
pass and this failed.
1-ous
(Continued on Page Six)
RUSSIAN PIANIST
WILL PLAY HERE
Ossip Gabrilowitsch, who will give
an all Chopin concert in Pattengill
auditorium next Tuesday, is by un-
iversal consent at the very head of
the Russian school of pianists. He is
considered one of the foremost artists
of this time.
His execution is round, broad, and
of warmth and charm. His appeal is
to the best, an inspiration free from
sensationalism, but stirring and up-

lifting. His splendid technical equip-
ment, astonishing though it is, is held
in subjection; the poet's nature is
always in evidence.

CHIMES TRYOUTS

Sophomore tryouts are want-
ed for the Chimes editorial staff.
They may report any day this
week between 4 and 6 o'clock at
the Chimes office on the third
floor of the Union.

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