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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 16, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

lltA £11\.31)! V 4"'.1L

PHONE 166
TRUBE Y
218 SOUTH MAIN
,QUALITYICE CREAM

TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUITELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADE IN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

Causrs to Frgtgnuaisand
Sororfiss

y a

$8O3OOO

Stock

of

Consisting of Every Fall and Winter
--Fitform.s

Suit and

Overcoat

in this Store is offered at prices way below real value
or for what you can duplicate the values elsewhere.
Our entire stock is at your mercy. No attention is
given to costs or replacement value. We must sell the
greater part of this stock before November 1 st. This
is the real clothing opportunity of the season and- you,
save much when you purchase here.
200 FINE OVERCOATS
NOT A COAT IN THIS LOT WORTH LESS

IT PAYS
CASHAYT
CORBETT'S
10 PER CENT
Reduction on .
FALL AND WINTER
HATS, CAPS AND FUR-
NISHINGS

LOWELL INDICATES
EDUCATIONAL EVILS
(Continued from Page 4),
trance examination with so low a grade
aa 33 per cent.
Credit System a Cause
"The failure to maintain rigorous
standards may well be connected with
the American system of measurement
by credits instead of by attainment.
Courses, whether in school, in college
or in any kind of education, instead of
being treated as an end, should be re-
garded as a means; and a test in them
should be, not a final award, but a
mere measure of progress. At present
the credit for~a course is treated like
a deposit in a savings bank, without a
suspicion that the deposit is not of
gold that can be drawn upon at its face
value, but of a perishable article. To
change the metaphor, we treat it like
wheat poured into a grain elevator,
whereas it is often more like the con-
tents of a cold storage plant without
the means of refrigeration. Indeed, it,
Is sometimes more like the contents of
an incinerator.
"There is an old saying in England
that an educated man should have for-
gotten Greek. If the adage is true, it.
Is not because the man had forgotten{
Greek, but because he retained some-
thing worth while from having learned,
it. Even if the material put into the,
mind be not perishable, we ought to,
distinguish between Information'and
education. Let me quote again Pro-
fessor Caullery. He says, "One must
not confound education and informa-
tion. There Is in the American sys-
tem, from the intellectual point of
view, too much of the second and too
little of the first," Storing of the mind
is not enough; we must also train the
student to use the store; and accumu-
lating credits for things done is not
the way to attain the result. When a'
man's life ends, we ask what he has
done; but a diploma from a school or
a degree from a college or university
is not an obituary, and when a stu-
dent's education ends we should ask,
not what he has done, but what he is
or has become.
Proper Examination Solution
"Can we measure what the boy or
man is or has 4,ecome; can we measure
him as he stands? It does not seem
impossible. Yet most of our examina-
tions are adapted to ascertain little
except knowledge, which tends to pro-

mote mere cramming; whereas the
tests in the great school of active life
depend rather upon the ability to use
information. Surely examinations can
be framed to measure not only knowl-
edge but the ability to comprehend and
correlate what is known. In short, to
test the grasp of a suhject as a whole.
Such a grasp requires a more rigorous
training in fundamentals than we are
in the habit of exacting. An examina-
tion of this kind would be not only a
measure of that which ,we desire to
ascertain, but it would tend also to
direct attention to a field of thought
instead of to small isolated fragments
of it. In short, it must not be forgot-
ten that examinations essentially con-
trol the content of education. If ex-
aminations demand a thorough knowl-
edge of fundamental principles, the
teachers will provide it and the stu-
dents will attempt to acquire it. If
they require merely a certain amount
of miscellaneous knowledge, that will
be the aim of instruction; and if, as in
many schools, there is no examination
at all, there is naturally less induce-
ment to attain a very high standard of
any kind.,#
A Difficult Art
"The mechanical practice of credit
for courses is, I believe, the gravest
defect in the American educational
system, and we ought to strive for
some method of general examinations
testing the real grasp of a subject as
a whole. But if such examinations are
possible, it is nevertheless certain that
they demand a skill which can be ac-
quired only by practice. The art of
examination is a difficult one, and in
America it is still in its infancy, par-
ticularly In the matter of measuring
the ability to use one's knowledge. The
new psychological tests are interesting
as an attempt to do this, to measure
the capacity of the boy or man as he
stands. They are crude, and for our
purpose they suffer under the defect
of assuming only the most elementary
information. We need tests that will
measure ability to use scholarly and
specific knowledge. Anyone who at-
tempts to introduce examinations of
this kind will be disappointed at first,
because the art has not yet been suffi-
ciently developed. To use them effect-
ively, we need to learn that the wcon-
duct of examinations is as 'important
and worthy a part of the educational
process as giving lectures, and quite
as stimulating to the teacher. Ascer-
taining what the pupil knows, measur-

ing his progress and deficiencies
indeed, a part of teaching, and c
as essential a portion of it as the
parting of information. The
teacher should be constantly botl
veloping the mind of his pupil,
ascertaining how rapidly and b
ficially the process is going on.
of the defects of much of our teac
-and especially of the lecture sy
-is that this second part of the f
tion of education is to a great de
lost from sight. An improvemer
our examination system which
measure the grasp of a whole sul
is, I believe, the most serious adv
that can be made in American ed
tion today."
FISH ASKS FOR CO.OPERATIOT
IN SCHOOLS AND COLLE
(Continued from Page 1)
"Formerjy man had' a knowledg
his neighbors' work and thus ga
the sympathy that comes with un
standing those about him. Tc
there is no such opportunity, and
of knowledge of another's work 'br
lack of sympathy and then distr
which is socially, economically,
politically the root of strife and
trust in the nation.
f"The speaker said that the so-ca
manual training courses in the
ondary schools, and the vocati
schools which are beginning to ap:
in numbers help to give the stu
an idea of what work really is an
the conditIons under which it mus
done. He believes that co-opera
courses should be carried out in
field of economics, and in all o
fields of study where a feasible
can be devised for its operation.
recommends also that sincere br
minded men be drawn from the wo
work to give part of their tim
address the student $nhis col
courses to give him a working kn
edge of life.
School of Music Enrolls 800
The University School of Music
be a more important part of the
versity this year, with an enrolir
of 800 students. They number
dents of 40 different states.
Groesbeck to Address Student
Alexander Groesbeck,' Republ
candidate for governor, will spea
University students during the
week in October.

THAN$50.00-YOU BUY AT
$33.50, $37.50, $40, $45, $48
Wale a Few Steps and Save Dollars

TOM CORBETT

116 E. Liberty St.

Between Main Street and Fourth Avenue

!7,

Vote "NO"

on the School Amendment

CHEMISTRY COATS

Because

HOSPITAL COATS

I

Governor Sleeper says:
I am opposed to the proposed constitu-
tional amendment abolishing Parochial
Schools.
Our commonwealth is broad enough to
accommodate all shades of religious belief.
It is big enough to give abundant room
for the operations of all the religious de-
nominations we have. The adoption of
this amendment would engender bitter-
ness and suspicion and distrust where
now, mutual trust and, good feeling to a
large extent prevail.
I urge all good citizens to oppose this
radical change.
Lieutenant Governor Dickinson says:
I am impressed that the present proposi-
tion is not one that will conduce to better
moral, friendly and charitable relations
betweeR citizens of the state that is so
much to be desired.
As an official in the War, I was proud of
the patriotism and efficiency shown by
those with whom I associated of both the
Lutheran and Catholic faith.
As chairman of the Near East Relief of
the State, I have also associated with
these people and admire their spirit of
loyalty and sympathy.
Attorney General Groesbeck, Repub-
lican Candidate for Governor says:
The proposed amendment is' in conflict
with the Federal Constitution and should
not be placed upon the ballot. The pro-
posed amendment tends most strongly to
foment ill feeling and acrimbnious dis-
cussion among the people.
I hold that the-right of the parent to ex-
ercise a reasonable control over the edu-
cation of his off-spring during the forma-
tive period of his character, is one of the,
most sacred rights preserved for the indi-
vidual under the Federal Constitution.
Ex - Governor Ferris, Democratic Can-
didate for Governor says:.
The amendment should be overwhelm-
ingly defeated. The recent war taught
us that Catholics, Lutherans, Methodists,
Congregationalists, Presbyterians, Chris-

tian Scientists and other denominations
can all work together. Our Democracy
should guarantee this privilege.
I feel that this is a cowardly attack upon
thousands of our best citizens.
Regent Frank B. Leland, of the Univer-
sity of Michigan says:
I do not favor this amendment for many
reasons. I think it is un-American and in
my opinion, its incorporation into the basic
law of the commonwealth would be most
unwise at any time.
As a lawyer it is my view that the proposed
amendment would not be constitutional
even if it were passed, thereforesit has no
place on the ballot.
Regent James 0. Murfin, of the Univer-
sity of Michigan says:
I am against this proposed amendment for
a number of reasons. First and foremost it
appearsto me it is dishonest; it is contrary
to sound principles and sound ideas, and is
the most decided step backward. I have
yet to learn a good sound argument for it.
President Frank S. Kedzie, of the Mich-
igan Agricultural College says:
I am not favorable to the anti-parochical
amendment for three main reasons :
First: Interferes with religious liberty.
Second: Introduces one more element
tending to unrest.
Third:- Would lessen education facilities
for the younger generation.
President McKenny, of the Michigan
State Normal School says:
This amendment if carried would shut out
thousands of children because of no public
school buildings to accomodate them.
Another reason is that there is no more
loyal group of men in America than those
who come from parochical or private
-schools. One-fourth of the men in the late
world war who fought for America came
fro m parochial and private schools.
The amendment is un-American and we
cannot afford to have it carried.

DENTISTRY COAT
OVERALLS AND COVERALLS
Waist Aprons, Bib Aprons, Rubbe
Aprons, Class Toques, Freshman Cap
Parcel Post Laundry Boxes
Clothing, Furnishings and Hats
Ayres and Smith Caps

Wadhams & C.

Two COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

t
i
t
w
t
i
r

r v' f Young MeLCn'l
Best Grade Cordovan Brogues..... . $16.00
Best Grade Cordovan Plain..........$15.00
Best Calf Skin Brogues.. . . .$14.00
Plain Calf Skin Shoes, $10.00 to........$14.50
WE INVITE COMPARISON
c
G ROSS
1.17 East Washington Street
ntriti rtn rrrrrrrrrrrril rrrrrriri ruliroi rrrlrrrii rrrrii rnrurrrril i niitiil

is

Vote "NO" on the Anti-Private School Amendment

,,

This Advertisement published and paid for by Educational Liberty League: Headquarters: 211 Holden Building, Detroit, Miehivan

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