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October 16, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-16

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one's merits, but in curing one's de-
ELL URGS R E ORMS fects; and the great defect in American
education has been the lack of thor-
oughness. The European professional
1manis apt to have a wider knowledge
and a broader foundation than the
(Continued from Page 1) American. Professor Maurice Caul-
e late war,' The two qualities cf lery, in his recent bok on the univer-
urcefulness and adaptability have sities and scientific life in the United
indeed, those that we have most States, in speaking of engineering edu-
ed in the past. They have been cation says, "The conditions of the
lutely essential for the great training of the American engineer and
rican achievement, unparalleled in his French colleague are very different.
hort- a period, of bringing under The latter has certainly a very marked
vation a vast wilderness, of de- superiority in theoretical scientific in-
ing the mines and other natural struction. I am told, indeed, that since
irces of a continent, and of devel- the war has brought into the American
g varied industries for a hundred industries a rather large numb'er of
ons of people. I'ut all this has our engineers, this fact is well recog-
been in lar'ge part done; the nized. There is in the United States
m has been skimmed; and the nothing to compare with the prepara-
t need of the hour is a better con- I tion of our competitive examinations
ation, a more confplete andscl-.far the Ecole Polytechnique and the
Ltion, amore comlete an ad

Mann's Bulletin on Engineering Edu-
cation to show that of the Freshmen
in 22 engineering schools only about
one-third could solve a simple alge-
braic equation. We are told also that
the English physiologists have a great
advantage over ours in a more com-
prehensive knowledge of physics and
chemistry; and probably anyone fa-
miliar with learned professions in the
two countries could give other ex-
amples.
Strict Standards Lacking
"As usual, a number of causes no
doubt contribute to the lack of thor-
oughness in American educatiop. One
obviously is the briefness of time spent
in study from birth through gradua-
tion from college. This is especially
true in the younger years. Our chil-
dren begin late and go slowly, ap-
parently on the theory that the less
conscious-effort a boy puts into the
process of education the more rapidly
will he proceed. Another cause is the
constant insertion of new subjects
which are either not of a very severe
nature or ought to be extra curriculum.
activities, subjects which are inserted
to the displacement of more serious
ones. If someone suggests that rural

walks and the observation of nature"
are good, the school, instead of provii-
ing them outside of school hours, in-
serts them in the school time in the
place of language, history or mathe-
matics.
"A third cause is the absence of
rigorous standards which, until a few
years ago, pervaded most college work
more than it does today, and which I
fear is still too largely present in the
schools. Last year a boy from a good
high school not far from the central
part. of the country, offered himself
for the College En'trance Board exam-
inations. He was the valedictorian of
his class, and yet in five subjects-in
all of which he had obtained a double
A at school-his marks were as fol-
lows: English Literature, 50; Latin,
41; American History, 37; Ancient
History, 30; Plane Geometry, 33. In
Physics, in which he had a B at schoolj
-which is, I suppose, an honor mark-I
his mark was only 28. The papers ofj
the College Entrance Examination
Board are not made out, nor are the I
books marked, by any one college, but!
by a body representing the colleges
and-schools. A difference in prepara-
tion might very well affect to some

extent an examination in Literature usually hig:
and History, possibly even in Latin; Geometry C
but surely a boy who obtains an un- (Cor

gut not to fail a
nued on Page 5)

ESTABLISHED 1818
MADISON AVEhWE COR. FORTY-FOURTH STREET
Telephone Murray Hill 88oo
Our Representative will be at the
HOTEL STATLER DETROIT,
on
MONDAY AND TUESDAY
OCTOBER 18 AND 19
with Fall Styles in Ready-made Garments for Dress, Travel
and Sporting Wear
Furnishings, Hats and Shoes
Send for "The Replenishment of the Wardrobe"

fc use, of our resources. In short,
time for superficial treatment on a
scale has largely passed, and the
has come for the greater thor-
mess of an older civilization.
Europeans "Better Prepared
Visdom consists, not in glorying in

Ecole Centrale. The first-year students
-the Freshmen-in the engineering
schools are very feebly -equipped." On
the other hand, he says, "It is not less'
true that the American engineer gives
abundant proof of the combination of
qualities which he needs." He then
gos on to give an example from

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series

PUBLIC SALE OF COURSE TICKETS NOT ORDERED BY MAIL AT
HILL' AUDITORIUM, SATURDAY, OCT.16 At A. M.

I

Thereafter so long as they rmay last at the
University School of Music

SIX ALL

STAR

NU BERS

TICKETS

(

With $3 Festival Coupon) $4.50, $5, $5.50, $6

Oct. 29'- Six Opera Singers

Nov. 11 - Sergei Rachmaninoff, Pianist

Dec. 2 - Jan Kubelik, Violinist

. I'BLE
Dire -c o,'ot f tUcr .
the , ( ..fUV> V
front <i ,. e e sc <<~tt :ciu5 ci t

I'r11essor of Music in
s asked to be relieved
. ,u I 'Ia(-dcmic year.

Jan. 24 - Detroit Symphony Orchestra
Feb. 24 -. Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra
Mar. 7 -Detroit Symphony Orchestra

EMIL OBERHOFFER

SEXTETTE FROM THEI. METROPOLITAN OPERA COMPANY

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