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March 12, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY,

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
ty year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
epublication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
redited in this paper and the local news published therein.

Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
s matter.
Subscription by carrier or rni~l, $3.56"
Offices :Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414.

. --I

.....

Communications not to exceed 3oo words, if signed, the sig
ue not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
th, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
isigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
ript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ssed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.

ou

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor................-............Chesser M. Campbell
Night Edtors- .W iccc
T. H. Adams H.W. Hitchcock
{. I. DakinJ. Mcai
enaud Sherwood T.Sargent, Jr
Sunday Editor ..................J. A. Bernstein
City Editor............-.........-.-.--B. P. Campbell
Editoals............LeeWoodruff, . A. Kern T ,hinery
me.... ...................-.-...- - Mary D. Lane
relegraph .......................Thomas Dewey
telescope ..................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
"osephine Waldo Wallace V.Elliott X. R. Meiss
Paul G. Weber Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Elizabeth Vickery lughston McBain Beata Hasley
G. Et. Clark Frank H. McPike Katlirine Montgomery
George Reindel A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Doroth Monfort iW.W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
HayB. Grundy Paul Watzel Sara Waller
frances Oberholtzer Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
Robert E. Adams M. A. Klavet

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ........LEGRAND a. GAINES JR.
Advertising..................................D. P. Joyce
Classifieds...................................... Robt.;0..Kerr
Publication .............. .......""....... ,....... M. Heath
Accounts............... .....................E. R. Priehy
Circulation *.............. --. ..... - ......V: F. R jr iller
Assistants
R. W. Lamnbrecbt P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunetadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawon
J. J, Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterwortb R. G. Burchell

team; if we don't get the pool we won't have Var-
'sity representation in this field of athletics.
Practically every other school in the Conference
has a recognized squad, as is. evidenced by the fact
that eight out of the ten universities had placed en-
tries in the Evanston meet up to a week or so ago.
Michigan has proved this year that she has men
here of aquatic ability, and if such men are given
some sort of an indcement beyond the prospect'of
merely receiving class numerals for their work, they
will turn out and the University will have a team
in every way capable of upholding the standard
which other forms of athletics have always set
here. But at present the prospect of a Varsity tank
squad is a dream merely, the realization of which is
entirely dependent upon whether or not we can
manage to complete the tank in the basement of the
Union
All of which is just one more strong argument in
favor of the Union pool project. It's up to us.
GLEE CLUB PROGRAMS
There is little doubt but that the trips of the Uni-
versity of Michigan Glee club are a source of sin-
cere enjoyment to the alumni residents of those for-
tunate towns which are put on the route of the or-
ganization. . Doubtless the reason for much of the
success of the club's trips may be traced to the ver-
bal advertising which these sons of Michigan feel
it a pleasure to give.
Alumni enjoy Glee club concerts because they
bring back memories of happy college days, not
quite buried in the distant past, and in looking for-
ward to an evening's entertainment, their thoughts
naturally turn back to the songs which they sang
when they were in school. There are many of them
which ar no longer sung' by University students.
Some have earned this oblivion, others might well
be revived, and if not by the student body in gen-
eral, at least by the Glee club.
It seems only right and proper, since it is the
alumni who make possible the success of the con-
certs, that the Glee club give an All-college pro-
gram, and not oneof which half -is taken up with
songs which are excellent in themselves, but quite
irrelevant upon such occasions. A very well-bal-
anced program may be secured by mixing the older,
more classical songs, with the others which we sing
today, and which are not so purely local in their ap-
plication as to be unintelligible to the alumni who are
out of touch with University affairs in.general, and
to the general public which makes up a fair share of
the audiences. We ought also to be able to produce
some original offerings every year.
Micihgan desires to retain the love and good-will
of its alumni, and ihere is little which will do more
to awaken that old love of . college days than an
evening of All-Michigan college songs, plus a few
shots of the goo4 old campus humor.
Now that the new University calendar has been
adopted, let us hope it provides against such con-
tingencies as the three-bolt Monday we underwent
before Washington's birthday.
May we soon be expecting photos of the arena-
in-building for the great Turner-O'Callaghan $i,ooo
debate? Or has another good promoter fallen
through?
MacDraft, the demon chimney-sweep,. ought to
make a fortune out of some pipes we've smelled
hereabouts - if he'd descend to that.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and -,Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:15 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Yposlanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.mn., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-MO)a. m.. and
12:10 p.m.

TVTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
A Nice Cozy Place Where
You Enjoy Your M'eal
One half block South
of "MAJ"

S SPAvDING & BROS.
211 S. Stage St., Chlcago,1B

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SPAT-DING
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Qv lvlwae is nfos. real .

-__--MARCH!
S M T W T F 8
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new. trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory fat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

i

0. D. WOOL and KHAKI SHIRTS

Army Officers Dress Shoes, 0. D. Laced
Riding and Sport Breeches, Leather and
Wrap Puttees
Leather Jerkins, Pup Tents, Barracks Bags, Hip Rubber
Boots, Mass Cans, Canned Fruit, Meats, Etc. on sale at

i

G R A H'A 1MV
Just Received---
Marshall & Lyon--- OUR ECONOMIC ORGANIZATION
for Econ 1
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
ia

Iv

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Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily ahould ae the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1921.
Night Editor-J, E. McMANIS.
BROAD OR NARROW AMERICANISM
"Marshall's heart is in the right place but he
has a rather. narrow concept of Americanism,"
was one comment heard on former Vice-presi-
dent Marshall's speech Thursday night. But
judging from his creed as he outlined it, is it
really narrow or does it only seem narrow be-*
cause it is practical and sound?
The ex-vice-president's American ideal has
none of the glitter of novelty. It is based on the
simple truths of Christianity which have been
common knowledge for nearly two thousand
years. Its keystone is the golden rule. And ac-
cording to Marshall, not until this text becomes
a part of the lives of the earth's inhabitants, will
the world's struggles cease.
An essential in his creed is that the people liv-
ing in the United States should make up one na-
tion of unhyphenated Americans. There is noth-
ing narrow in this. Foreigners who come here
because they prefer our institutions should be
proud to give as well as take; and asking them
to become Americans without reservations is a
small request if they are actuated by sincere mo-
tives. Because of the millions of undigested
aliens here at present - people who live clan-
nishly together making little effort to learn our
language - Marshall would place new require-
ments on immigrants after acceptance,.to the end
that our foreign born population would be forced
to learn English and actually melt in the well-
known container.
Marshall- proposed that Americans turn their
attention from discovering new inalienable rights
and seek new duties and means of being of serv-
ice. In their contribution to winning the rights
of man, the ex-vice-president asserts the Anglo-
Saxon peoples have done a big service to human-
ity but this field has been about worked out. e
His final requisite is that American democracy'
be complete. In this connection Mr. Marshall
scored alike the fostering of class feeling at both
ends of the- social scale and the attitude found in
some Americans that everything is right- that isn't
illegal.
While it may be taken as narrow by those who
are looking for new doctrines, Marshall's creed
of Americanism may be made as broad as - any-
one chooses. It is based on the unselfish conduct
of the individual, and there is good reason to be-
lieve that what its citizens are individually goes a
long ways in determining how near a nation will
approach the ideal.

4

W.~ h.
OTHERS SAY:
SPEAKING OF ARTISTS
(From the Daily Iowan)
Too often the statement that artis
tic work has no necessary place in the
affairs of the practical man has been
made without thought of contradic-
tion. Many business men and women
harbor the belief that artists, of all
kinds, might well be left to scramble
for themselves. Even here, at the
university, one feels himself quite
tolerant of the idiosyneracies of his
brothers, if he occasionally holds out
a helping hand or an encouraging
word to those who are interested in
some form of artistic endeavor.
Yet one might not be unwarranted
in the contention that the artist is one
of those who brings chaos out of our
unrelated ideas. We live and gather
to ourselves all sorts of ideas, the-
ories, and hints as to courses of ac-
tion, without being able to formulate
these into any definite philosophy of
living.
Then we pick up a novel, someone
lends us an essay, we try out a bit of
poetry, or view a play, and find that
come artist, whom we have never
seen, has brought together many of
the matters which have irritated us;
has sifted out the chaff in them and
given us the problem and the solution
in an artistic and satisfactory form.
Many women who feel that they fill
only a decorative need in their homes
might well read "The Doll's House."
"The Dauber" will clarify manyprob-
lems for all of us. There is much
meat in "Vanity Fair." The list is not
lengthened here because when the
idea is brought to mind the practical
worth of artistic effort becomes ob-
vious.
It is the artist who clothes our
sometimes drab affairs with beauty.
His discrimination makes the canvas
excell the photograph. In addition, he
is one to whom we can go when life
becomes too various and complex for
our understanding.
MASONIC NOTICE
All Masons on the campus are in-
vited to attend the meeting of the
Craftsmen's Club this evening at the
Masonic Temple. The third degree
will be conferred at 7:30 P. M. Final
arrangements will be made for the
Detroit trip.-Adv.

~ARMY SURPLUS STORE-- 213 H. FOURTH AYE.
_ w
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eet'I
Dining
_ w
R 0'0 M--w S
For "eats" that are
exceptional-
Like you get at home
- Phone 1462W 805 E. Huron

"Gets Long Term for Robbery of 13
hollers a news head. At last someone is
his money's worth.

Cents,"
getting

n TheTelescop.e
Well, Don't Show the Young Bucks Up, Steve
Fifteen men including Coach Farrell and Trainer
Billy Fallon will compete at M. A. C. Friday night
in an invitation meet. - Thursday's Daily.
For depth of feeling and real pathos we submit
Jay Gould's latest contribution to the world of lit-
erature:
I clenched my fist to strike him,
To kill the cowardly knave ;
He looked at me and feebly smiled
The smile of a beaten slave.
He smiled - but in that instant
I saw not a cowardly knave,
For by that smile I realized
That at heart he was strong and brave.
We were comrades - not by our own desires
But made so by an act of fate.
As war makes kin of soldiers
Who fight to save the state.
I could not strike a comrade,
To him I must be fair,
We had struggled and bled and suffered
Through a siege in the dentist's chair.
Paging Mr. Ananias
While the official count showed that only 30 lits
received all A's, the unofficial figure for those who
"received all A's except one B" today stands at
4,567.
Famous Closing Lines
"Climbing into our clothes," said Adam to Eve
as they shinned up the fig tree.
NOAH COUNT.

DOBB'S

FIFTH AVE.

HATS

Season 1921'

2

ONE MORE POINT FOR THE POOL
Although the efforts of the Student Council to
ecure recognition for the informal swimming team
o that it might be entered in the Conference meet
oon to be held at Northwestern were unavailing,
hey at least succeeded in securing from the Board
a Control of Athletics a definite statement as to
that may and what may not be exepected.
According to the board, the whole matter becomes
question now as to whether or not the swimming
ool is to be completed. If we get the natatorium
t the Union and thus give the squad a place to
ork out, Michigan will have a Varsity swimming

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