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March 12, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER ASSOCIATED
PROBABLY RAIN AND
COLDER TODAY D X.A A AYHAY AND NXAHT. FIER
VOL. XXXI. No. 110. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1921. PRICE FIVE CN

__ T.

PROBLEMS TAKEN
UP BYlCABINET
HARDING HOLDS LONG SESSION
WITH DEPARTMENT
READS
INFORMATIVE REPORTS
TAKE UP MOST OF TIME
Questions of Threatened Strike and
Shipping Board Appointments
Considered
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 11.-Many prob-
lems of departmental organization,
together with various pressing ques-
tions of public policy, were discussed
by President Harding and his cabinet
today at a three hour meeting.
The threatened strike of packing
house employees and the selection of
a new shipping board are understood
to have occupied first attention, and
after they had been put aside, the
President asked each of his secretar-
ies to report conditions in his depart-
ment as they had revealed themselves
during the first week of the new ad-
ministration.
The replies started several extended
discussions, so long that Mr. Harding
took the members of his official fam-
fly to lunch with himirn the White
House.
Although several of the secretaries
were ready to recommend important
appointments within their depart-
ments, their suggestions were put over
to be discussed privately with the
President. It was said that few decis-
ions were reached, most of the discus-
sion being of an informative nature.
The reorganization plans to be inaug-
urated soon are understood to have
been touched on only incidentally, the
cabinet members agreeing that steps
of that kind should wait until they
had more fully familiarized themselv-
es with general conditions.
FRAYER COMPARES 1920
*WITH 1820. CONDITIONS

i
1

'Women Pass $1000
Mark In Campaign
Six women's houses have subscrib-
ed 100 per cent to the Dr. Clara Sarg-
ent campaign, total contributions to
which now anount to more than
$1,000. Martha Cook building, Betsy
Barbour house, Helen Newberry res-
idence, Pi Beta Phi, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, and Kent hall are the houses
which have made the full subscrip-
tion. Martha Cook is also giving a
benefit card party this afternoon.
"We are much pleased with the
manner in which the girls have given
to the fund," is the statement of Gert-
rude Boggs, '22, chairman of the cam-
paign. "We must insist, however, that
all workers report so that we may
compute the total amount donated."

t
i
t,

TWO M.ICI GYM'
MARKS BROKEN BY
WESBROOKI WALKERi

Sophomore Pr o m Is Social Success
Harked By Simplicity And Dignity:
Capacity Crowd Enjoys Functions

OHRIER OF SALE
Of TICKETS FOR
O PERA ANNOUNCE

MICHIGAN, ATHLETES ARE
PLACE WINNERS AT
LANSING

EASY

is

SMALL GROUP OF MEN NOW
THEN, CONTROLLING
FORCE

OpINION FAVORHS
AD9VIS ORYTSYSTEM
Students to Vote on Committee to Aid
in Conduct and Govern.
ment
SHOULD DRAW FACULTY
AND STUDENTS TOGETHER
Student opinion decidedly favors the
proposed student advisory committee
which will be voted upon by the cam-
pus next Wednesday. Statements so-
licited yesterday from various men
showed that all believe the plan to be
a good one, and deserving of the sup-
port and the vote of every man on the
campus.
Fred J. Petty, '21, president of the
senior lits, stated that "the desire for
greater responsibility in the execu-
tion of student acvities and affairs
has been clearly shown by an accept-
ance of the recommendation that a
student advisory committee be elect-
ed. The duty of members of this
committee will be to represent the
student body in general policies of
student conduct and to confer regular-
ly with Dean Bursley, submitting to
him such matters as they believe im-
portant for consideration.
Greater Responsiblity
"I believe this committee may per-
form a most distinct function in rep-
resenting the student view-point, at a
time when an effort is being made for
students to obtain greater responsi-
bility. Certainly it will help to in-
crease co-operation between faculty
representatives and students, encour-
aging a more mutual understanding."
C. Stewart Baxter, '21, chairman of
the committee that drew up the plans
and constitution for the student ad-
visory committee, said: "The commit-
tee that drew up the plans is very
anxious that every man on the cam-
pus should know exctly what the
student advisory committee is to be
and what functions it will perform in
the event of its adoption; that mem-
bership on the committee is not to
serve as a warrant for policing the
campus, but that it is to aid in direct-
ing policy and care for the larger
measures of undergraduate life.
"If this proposed committee works
out as it is planned it should serve as
a valuable means of communication
between the faculty and the stu-
dents, that which is at present lack-
ing. The measure deserves the hear-
ty backing of the student body and the
(Continued on Page Six)
GIRLS' MANDOLIN CLUB GIVES
ALL-CAPUS DANCE TODAY
An All-campus dance will be given
from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock this after-
noon at the Armory, by the Girls'
Mandolin club. Nobe Wetherbee's or-
chestra will furnish the music.
Tickets, admitting a couple, are on
sale at Graham's bookstore, and will
also be sold at the door. One dollar
is the price of a couple ticket.

VARSITY 2 MILE RELAY
QUARTET WINS RACE
Stipe, Van Orden, and Naylor Also
Take Places For Wolverine
Team
Michigan's Varsity track team gar-
nered three first places, one second,
and a third place in the Michigan
Agricultural college invitation meet
for state colleges and high schools at
East Lansing last night. Wolverine
athletes took the large share of the
honors in each event in which they
were entered with the exception of
the 40 yard dash.
Walker, wearing the Maize and
Blue in the high jump, took first place
in this event and established a new
gymnasium record with a -leap of 5
feet, 8 3-4 inches. He was not forc-
ed to extend himself and was satis-
fied with his winning performance. He
hung up a mark of 6 feet and 3-4
inch in the Illinois Relay carnival at
Urbana last week.
Two Wolverines Place
Wesrook had little difficulty in
taking the pole vault at 11 feet 7
inches, which is also a new gymna-
sium record. Naylor of Michigan was
third.
Honors in the two mile relay were
taken by the Michigan squad compos-
ed of Burkholder, Burns, Bowen, and
Moerz. Each of the men ran a strong
race and the distance was complet-
ed in 8 minutes, 46 seconds.
Hulser, of the Western State Nor-
mal school, outdistanced the field in
the shot put with a heave of 42 feet,
1 inch. Van Orden of Michigan was
second at 41 feet, 10 1-2 inches. Stipe
of Michigan was third with 40 feet,
5 inches. ,
(Continued on Page Six)
'NEXT FACULTY CONCERT
ON SUNDAY MAR. 13
WILL INCLUDE UNUSUAL NUMT-
BERS BY ADVANCED SCHOOL
OF MUSIC STUDENTS
(By S. B. C.)
The next concert on the Faculty
concert series is to be given at 3
o'clock Sunday afternoon in Hill aud-
itorium. An unusual program is of-
fered by members of the faculty of
the University School of Music.
Four compositions by an advanced
student in the School of Music, Mrs.
Helen M. Snyder, will be the feature
of the occasion. Two of these are
for flute, clarinet and string quartet,
and two for flute, oboe, and clarinet.
The composer will play the flute
part.
A sonata by Daniel Gregory Mason,'
who recently lectured here in the Fac-
ulty concert series, will be played by
Mrs. Okkelberg and -Mr. Lockwood.
Other numbers will be an aria and a
group of songs by Miss Hunt, and trio!
for piano, violin, and viola of Mozart
played by Mrs. Okkelberg, Mrs. Lock-
wood and Mr. Lockwood, respective-
ly. Piano accompaniments for Miss
Hunt will be played by Clara Lundell.
Pres. Burton's Condition Improving
President Marion L. Burton was re-i
ported last night to be greatly im-
proved. He is now well beyond the
danger point, but it is not expected
that he will be able to return to his
office for some time yet.

Achieving first place in University
social affairs by reason of the cancell-
ing for this year of the J-Hop, the
Sophomore Prom, held last evening in
the ball room of the Michigan Union,
easily asserted its right to the posi-
tion thus attained. The simplicity of
the decorative scheme, cast against
the effective background of the huge
ball room, made a fitting scene for the
affair which will long be remembered
as one of the most successful of Uni-
versity social affairs.
Shortly after 9 o'clock,. "The Vic-
tors," played by "Nobe" Wetherbee's
orchestra, sounded the signal for the
grand march, and 250 couples swung
in line. L. Perkins Bull, chairman of
the committee, with Miss Juliette
Henkel, of Detroit, led the march. As
the couples approached the west end
of the room, attractive programs were
given out. The programs were en-
cased in heavy leather folders, those
for the ladies being designed as van-
ity cases, each containing a small
mirror.
Play Sixteen Dances
With the close of the grand march,
the orchestra swung into a one-step,
the first of 16 dances on the program.
Supper was served in two shifts, the
first at 10:30 o'clock and the second
an hour later. No intermission was
made in the dances and during the
supper period, the five extras on the
program were played. Dancing con-
tinued until two.
Ferns, daffodils and other spring
flowers formed the nucleus of the deck
orations. No attempt was made to
completely decorate the huge ball
room, and the excellence of the effect
attained was heightened by their sim-
plicity. In each corner of the room,
attractive lisplays of spring flowers
were placed, and at the east end an
artistic touch was gained by screening
the fire-place with daffodils and ferns.
Orchestra at West Eend
The orchestra occupied a place at
the west end of the room, screened
from the dancers by a row of palms
and a low partition upon which the
numerals of the class, in heavy white
STATE RAILROAD FARES
INCREASED 20 PER CENT

Captained
Is

letters were hung. Ten pieces of
"Nobe" Wetherbee's orchestra furnish-
ed the music for the evening.
The raised platform at the north
end of the room was reserved for the
chaperons, President and Mrs. Marion
L. Burton, Dean and Mrs. John R.
Effinger, Dean and Mrs. Mortimer E.f
Cooley, Dean and Mrs. Emil Lorch,
Dean and Mrs. Marcus L. Ward, Dean
and Mrs. William H. Butts, Mr. and
Mrs. Arthur G. Hall, Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick P. Jordan, Prof. and Mrs.
Louis A. Strauss, Prof. and Mrs.
Evans Holbrook, Prof. and Mrs. Wig-
liam C. Hoad. The illness of Presi-
dent Burton made it impossible for
him to be present, and illness also
prevented Mr. Jordan's attendance.
Credit to Committee
Considerable credit is due the com-
mittee for the excellent arrangements
(Continued on Page Six)
EocoSHIELDS, 96L
TO SPEAK SUONDAY

RESERVATIONS START
FOR STUDENTS IN
PRODUCTION

Baseball Team in 94, and
Nbw Prominent in
State

ASI

RAISE

TOW
'21

Several fundamental similarities and
differences between the political and
social conditions existing during the
early nineteenth century and those of
today were pointed out by Prof. Wil-
liam A. Frayer of the history depart-
ment in a lecture on "1820-1920: a
Comparison" delivered before the In-
tercollegiate Socialist society at 8
o'clock last night in room P 162 Nat-
ural Science building.
"The Congress of Vienna and the
Peace conference are identical in that
a small group of men controlled the
actions of both assemblies and the res-
toration of legitimate governments
was the aim of both bodies. The prime
difference lies in the fact that a great
effort was made to build up an effec-
tive association of nations at the
Congress of Versailles which was not
made at Vienna," said Professor
Frayer.
In regard to social conditions Pro-
fessor Frayer stated that poverty,
unemplpyment, and high taxes reigned I
supreme after 1820. "People were
pessimistic about the good in their
fellow men and thought that the
world was going to the dogs. The
same conditions exist today, differing
only in proportion to the betterment
of economic welfare. People are al-
ways willing to tear down modes of
government but they have never had
any constructive program for build-
ing up.
(Continued on Page Six)

MADE TO MEET
OF INTERSTATE
LINES

RATE]

Passenger rates on every steam line
in the state were advanced 20 per
cent, plus war tax, beginning mid-
night Thursday, March 10. The raise
was made to bring the rates on lines
within the state to a scale comparative
with those of interstate rates. Ac-
cording to Michigan Central author-
4ities here Michigan railroads were
among the last lines in this section
of the country to take this action.
This raise in rates applies only to
intrastate trips on steam roads, and
does not affect the rates established
at present for interstate passenger
traffic. This may be more clearly il-
lustrated by the fact that one may,
travel from Ann Arbor to Chicago,
Boston, or any other point outside of
the state, at the same rate at which
he purchased his ticket before March
10, but whereas the former fare to
Detroit via the Michigan Central was
$1.17, it is now $1.39. The advance
will be felt to a greater extent, how-
ever, on longer trips such as Ann Ar-
bor to .Sault Ste. Marie or to Grand
Rapids, the fare having been boosted
from $13.78 to $16.75 and $4.31 to
$5.17, respectively. To Niles, the fare
has advanced from $5.02 to $6.05.
Passenger rates on all electric lines
throughtout the state remain the
same, not being affected by any intra-
state movement.

SUBJECT ANNOUNCED AS
"A MAN OUT OF COLLEGE"
Edmund C. Shields, '96L, of Lan-
sing, who speaks on "A Man Out of
College" at the meeting at 3:30
o'clock Sunday afternoon in the
Union, is a man of state prominence.
During the war he was state chairman
of the Four Minute Men, and was also
a member of the legal advisory board
for the Thirty-fifth Michigan district.
He was an "M" man, having played
for three years as center-fielder on the
Varsity baseball team, and was cap-
tain in 1894. In his last year here he
was president of the Athletic associa-
tion and at one time was secretary of
the Board in Control of Athletics.
As a practicing attorney in the
state capital, he will tell of his view
of life in the light of his experiences
since leaving the University. The ad-
dress is one of the series of Union
Sunday afternoon meetings.
MICHIGAN TOWNS HEAR FOUR
FACULTY MEN IN LECTURES
Four lectures were given in Michi-
gan towns yesterday by members of
the University faculty under the di-
rection of the University Extension
service. Prof. John L. Brumm,of the
rhetoric department, spoke at a fa-
ther and sons' banquet in Durand.
Prof. Ray K. Immel, of the public
speaking department, gave a lecture-
recital, "The Devil's Disciple," at the
Methodist church in Denton.
Prof. C. H. Griffitts, of the psychol-
ogy department, spoke on "Conditions
Affecting Mental Efficiency" before
the Women's club of Battle Creek. O.
W. Stephenson, of the history depart-
ment, lectured on "John Marshall,
Our Greatest Jurist," at Grand Rap-
ids.
Registrar A. G. Hall left yesterday
on a lecture trip which will include
Rockford, Caledonia, Greenville, Ionia
and Belding. At each of these places
he will give an illustrated lecture on
"The University of Michigan and the
Youth of Michigan."
Rabbi Hershman to Address Zionists
Rabbi A. M. Hershman, of Detroit,
will address a meeting of the Inter-
collegiate Zionist society at 8:15
o'clock Sunday night in Lane hall au-
ditorium. Election of officers will fol-
low the address.

BEST CHANCES TO GO
TO MEMBERS OF UNION
Performances Start March 29 for -
Run of Four Evenings and
Matinee
Details of the order of precedence
for tickets to the Union opera, "Top o'
th' Mornin'," which opens at the Whit-
ney theater at 8:15 o'clock Tuesday
evening, March 29, for a run of four
evenings and a matinee Saturday aft-
ernoon of that week, were announced
yesterday. The public has been divid-
ed into five classes, and mail order
envelopes will be given to the groups
at intervals of two days. Orders will
be filled in the order of their receipt.
Second Choice Urged
In order to give most satisfaction,
the Union urges that people make
more than one choice for perform-
ance. It may be that only very poor
seats will remain unsold on some
nights, while on the next night seats
in thedmiddle of the house could be
secured.
The plan this year is much the
same as last, except that the mail
order privilege has been extended to
annual members. Prices are thersame,
being $2.50 for the entire lower floor
and box seats, $2.00 for the first four
rows in the balcony, $1.50 for the sec-
ond four rows in the balcony, and
$1.00 for the remainder. No war tax
will be charged.
The ticket sale calendar is as fol-
lows:
March 12-Mail order envelopes
given to cast, chorus, committees and
orchestra.
March 14-Mail order envelopes
mailed to full paid life members in
Washtenaw county.
March 16-Mail order .,envelopes
mailed to participating life members
In Washtenaw county.
Annual Members, March 18
March 18-Mail order envelopes
given to annual members in the Union
lobby, starting at 9 o'cock in the
morning.
March 19-All money orders must
be received by this date.
March 22 and 23-Box office sale at
the Union for members not sending in
mail orders. Hours-from 10 to 12
o'clock in the morning, and from 2 to
5 o'clock in the afternoon.
March 24-Box office sale to Univer-
sity women, from 2 to 5 o'clock at
Hill auditorium.
March 25--General box office sale at
the Whitney theater.
VETERANS PLAN PICTURE
OF LIFE "VRTEE
FORMER MEMBERS OF A. E. F.
PRESENT "C'EST.LA GUERRE"
TUESDAY
With daily rehearsals under the
direction of Hamilton Cochran, '22,
and Arthur McCaffery, '23, authors of
the play, "C'est la Guerre" is rapid-
ly being brought into shape for pre-
sentation next Tuesday night. Prof.
Rene Talamon, of the French depart-
ment, is assisting in instilling the
proper amount of French "esprit" in-
to the dialect of the mademoiselles
and Yank soldiers who compose the
cast.
Each man who will take a part in
the play was a member of the Amer-
ican overseas forces, and consequent-
ly they are all personally familiar
(Continued from Page Six)

._ _.

ALL STAR
CAMPUS CAST
Hill Auditorium
- 8 O'clock

University Post VETERANS Of FOREIGN WARS Presents

ALL STAR
CAMPUS CAST

C'est

Ia

Guerre

Written, Produced and Acted by Men Who Were "Over There"

Tues. Eve.Mar.15
50 Cents

TICKETS AT GRAHAM'S

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