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March 11, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR; CONTINUED COLD
TODAY

g gi*t an

VOL. XXXI. No. 109.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MARCH 11, 1921.

t

ARD FOCUSES
ATETINUPON
FOREIGN FFIRS
MEXICAN, RHINE, AND CENTRALt
AMERICAN MATTERSl
CONSIDERED
PRESIDENT TO PICK ,
AMBASSADORS SOON1
Byron T. Herrick May Go to France;t
Harry L. Wilson Mentioned for
Italian Post
Washington;, March 10. - As the
new administration settles down to a
working basis both President Harding
and his advisors are giving increas-
ing attention to the country's foreign
relations.
For the moment, selection of a new
set of, diplomatic representatives
abroad, relations with Mexico, the
Rhine situation, the League of Na-
tions, and the Panama-Costa Rica con-
troversy are subjects in the forefrontl
of consideration, although there is no
indication that any of them have
reached a stage forecasting immedi-
ate action.
So far as diplomatic appointments
soon to be made are concerned, it was
said authoritatively that no final se-
lection tad been made. The nearest
approaches to actual choices are un-r
derstood to be those of Byron Thom-]
as Herrick of Ohio for ambassador to
France, a post from which he resign-
ed early in the first Wilson adminis-
tration, and Harry Lane Wilson, for-
mer ambassador t6 Mexico, who is
mentioned in connection with the am-
bassadorship to Italy.
The question of Mexican relations
hinges upon the ability of the new
administration of President Obregon
to establish a regime that will permit
American recognition, but there is lit-
tle evidence that a formal recognition
may be possible in the near future.
Today's dispatches from Paris stat-
ing that the French embassy here was
reported to have approached the state
department on the subject of partici-
pation in some modified form of the
League of Nations were the first public
intimations that negotiations regard-
ing the league had been received.
AMERICAN LEGION DRIVE TO
CONTINUE THROUGHOUT WEEK
More Than 400 Ex-Service Men Have
Petitioned for Membership in
Local Post
Although the American Legion drive
for new members has so far been
even more successful than officials
had hoped for, the campaign did not
end Wednesday, as was stated in The
Daily yesterday morning, but will con-
tinue throughout the week.
The method of securing applications
for membership by having tables plac-
ed at various points about the cam-
pus proved to be quite productive of
results. Up to last night reports
showed that some 400 ex-service men
had petitioned to become members in
the University post, and still a num-
ber of committeemen were yet to be
heard from.
The campaign for the rest of the
week will be conducted on much the
same principle as was employed at the
beginning of the drive, personal so-

licitation being conducted by mem-
bers of the committee appointed to
handle the campaign.
hawalan University Offers Fellowship
One fellowship, of the value of $1200,
is being offered by the University of
Hawaii for study in "Pineapple Cul-
ture." This fellowship is donated by
the Hawaiian Pineapple Packers' As-
sociation, for one year, subject to re-
newal for a period not to exceed three
years in all.}

No Skinner Play
Here Tomorrow
After every seat in the house had
been sold and many mail orders were
being returned unfilled, the manage-
ment of the Whitney theater received
the following telegram from the di-
rector of the "At the Villa Rose"
troupe which was scheduled to play
here tomorrow night:
"The Otis Skinntr company will be
unable to give a performance in Ann
Arbor Saturday, March 12, as our
baggage car was burned this morning,
damaging our scenery and properties
too badly to permit our giving a per-
formance this week."
Don McIntyre, manager of the Whit-
ney, announced that the company
would probably appear here at a later.
date. Money for tickets will be re-
funded at the box ofilce.
"I WANT TRUTH,"
STATES BURSLEY

J
3
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1
i
3
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New Dean of Students, Speaking
Junior Lit Smoker, Says He
Desires to Help Men

at

p t
FOR LIMITATION
OF IMMIGRAITION
ASKS FOR INTELLECTUAL HON-
ESTY BY AMERICAN
PEOPLE'
ADDRESS RINGS WITH
PATRIOTIC SENTIMENT
Former Vice-President Proposes Sub-
stitute for Expensive Process
of Americanization
In an address ringing with fervent
patriotic sentiment and tempered with
a liberal amount of humor, Thomas
R. Marshall, former vice-president of
the United States, pleaded for strict
limitation of immigration, firm crys-
tallized opinion on the problem of the
foreigner, and greater intellectual
honesty on the part of the American
people last night in Hill auditorium.
The speech was the last on the Ora-
torical association program.
Admit Only Farmer Laborers
"The next immigration law that is
passed should provide that only for-
eign farm laborers be admitted to this
country and that they be put to work
under American farmers. Then if
they do not learn to be American cit-
izens, we should send them home,"
Mr. Marshall declared.
"The only thing that is wrong with
America is that we are not intellect-
ually honest. By that I mean that we
want to do shady things which the law
does not specifically prohibit. The
employer should take the attitude that
his business is 'not being conducted
for himself alone but for his work-
men as well. The employe should
give a full day's labor for a day's
wage."
Proposes Substitute
Regarding the administration's prop-
osition to Americanize foreigners by
an expensive educational process,
Mr. Marshall proposed what 'he con-
sidered a more economic and effect-
ual plan. "Amend ypur laws and take
away their ballot until they learn to
read, wvrite land speak the English
language."
Dean A. H. Lloyd of the Gr'aduate
school, in introducing the speaker
said: "Both parties commend him be-
cause of his fairness, good humor, and
comomn sense."
OPERA REHEARSAILS FOR
SECOND ACT COMMENCE

CHANGE S IN UNIVERSITY CALENDAR
MADE BY SENATE COUNCIL COMMITTEE

SWIMMING RECOGNITION IS QUESTION
OF HAVING AMPLE POOL FACILITIES

TURNER OFFERED $1,000
FOR CLEVELAND DEBATE
Offering him $1,000 to debate
Donald O'Callaghan in Cleveland
next Sunday, Prof. E. R. Turn-
er, of the history department, re-
ceived a telegram from that city
Wednesday. While the subject
of the debate was not mentioned,
In all probability it will concern
concern the Irish question, as it
is said that Mr. O'Uallaghan is a
!brother of the late lord mayor of
Cork who was recently assassin-
ated.
Professor Turner woild make
no definite statement relative to
whether he would accept the
challenge, but it is expected that
his decision will be made public
tomorrow when the professor
answers the telegram.
At the present time a debate
is also pending between Profes.
sor Turner and Miss Mary Me-
Swiney, sister of the late Ter.
ence McSwiney of Cork.

ALSO DISCUSSES ROOMING'
QUESTION FOR NEXT YEARt
"What I want most in dealing withj
men is the truth," said J. A. Bursley,
Dean of Students, at the Junior Lit
smoker last night at the Union. "If I
get the truth I may be able to help
the men, and I shall certainly be able
to decide better what is right."
According to Dean Bursley his func-
tion as yet is not fully defined. "I am
to be the representative of the Pres-
ident, but just what that means we
do not yet know."
The new dean spoke of the room-I
ing question also, saying tht writ-
ten leases w'ould probably be em-
ployed next year to avoid the misun-
derstanding which has been the cause
of most of the trouble. An inspector
of rooming houses is a possibility," he
said.
0. W. Rush, president of the class,
spoke of the unpleasant notoriety
which the University is having at pres-
ent. "There must be co-operation be-
tween students, faculty, and officials
if the reputation of the University is
to be maintained," he said.
"Duke" Dunne told of the trouble
at Illinois, and dismissed it as insig-
nificant. Hugh Hitchcock, chairman
of the social committee, told of plans
of the committee for future smokers
and sings.
MAC DRAFT, CHIMNEY
SWEEP, SEEN IN TOWN
A curious crowd of students col-
lected around the entrance to the
Nickel's arcade for what was to many
of them their first glimpse of a chim-
ney sweep. "Mac Draft", the name
this rejuvenator of chimneys chooses
to be known by, has experienced a
picturesque life. At the immature age
of 12 he began his travels and has
been more or less of a "rolling
stone" ever since.
While stoking on a Cunard liner,
Mac was the victim of an accident
which caused him the loss of sight
in his right eye. As the Cunard line
agreed to s'ettle for $5,000 cash, Mac
decided to accept. After this incident
Draft lived like a plutocrat, visiting
every port where his fancy directed
him and enjoying life to the fullest
extent.
Draft is naturally an active man,
and it was not long until he tired of
so aimless a life. His uncle in Swit-
zerland persuaded him to come there
to take up the profession of sweep-
ing chimneys. Through his influence,
Mac received his diploma in two and
one-half years, which is half the time
it ordinarily requires.
Mac began sweeping chimneys in
America eight years ago in Stillwa-
ter, Minn. He plies his trade from
Labor day until Decoration day, and
after that the weather is so warm
that he takes to painting church stee-
ples and flag poles.
Draft, whose full name is Gerald
Maximillian Wiliam Stoll, makes a
quaint appearance in his soot cover-
ed overalls and peaked hat with his
naem and trade strapped Drdinnnn
name and trade strapped to headgear

Ac wrdlng to New Arranoiuwett,
Christmas Vacation Begins
Dec. 16
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
ONE WEEK EARLIER IN JUNE
In accordance with the new Ugiver-
sity calendar arranged for the com-
ing nine years by a committee of the
Senate council, consisting of Dean E.
H. Kraus, of the Summer session, Sec-
retary L. A. Hopkins, of the engineer-
ing college, and Registrar Arthur G.
Hall, and approved recently by the
Senate council, the University Senate,
and the Board of Regents, the Univer-
sity year will open one week earlier
in the fall and close one week earlier
the following June.
Commencement Dates Changed
The. essential differences between
the new and old calendars are the
change in the Christmas vacation and
commencement dates. According to
the approved schedule, Christmas va-
cation will always begin on a Friday
night and usually close on the first
Monday night following New Year's.
In case New Year's day falls on a
Monday, classes will begin on Wed-

nesday, while in the

event that New

CARL BROMEL DIRECTS
STAUCTION OF SHOW'S
SCENERY

CON-

Rehearsals of the second act of "Top
o' th' Mornin'" are in progress, the
interest of the cast and chorus of the
1921 Union opera having been trans-
ferred from the first act which was
finished the first of this week. The
entire opera will be practiced daily in
the workshop, beginning next week,
according to E. Mortimer Shuter, di,
rector. Cast and chorus still re-
hearse separately, but by the first of
next week they will be taken together.
Scenery for the first act is almost
complete. The Michigan Union con-
struction company, under the direction
of Carl Bromel, of Detroit, has been
working for five weeks, and will con-
tinue until the evening of the first
performance. "The scenery for the
first act is the most elaborate set-
ting for an initial act ever produced
by a Union opera," said Mr. Shuter
yesterday.
Mr. Bromel, scenery production di-
rector, is said to be one of the best
stage scenery artists in the West. Dur-
ing the recent engagement of the Zieg-
feld Follies in Detroit, he was asked
to spend the entire time in retouching
their settings.
CONDITION OF PRESIDENT
BURTON REPORTED BETTER
President' Marion L. Burton was re-
ported yesterday afternoon to be
much better than at any time since he
was taken ill. His temperature show-
ed a further decrease, and he had a
very comfortable night Wednesday
night.

Marshall Gives Interesting Faects
On Former Position, In Interview
"I look upon Senator Wadsworth a woman sued him for $20,000 when
of New York as the 'white hope' of he was the 17 year, old editor of the
the Republican party. If they stay in Wabash college paper. He went to
power, he will be president some Benjamin Harrison, an Indianapolis
day," declared Thomas R. Marshall attorney who was afterwards presi-
in an interview yesterday afternoon dent, asking him whether the article
at his room in the Union. published was libelous. "'Young
The diminutive former vice-presi- man,' said Harrison, 'if I wanted to
dent was in the best of spirits, and have an enemy libelled, I would hire
his eyes twinkled as he puffed, his ciyou'"
gar and told how it felt to b a com- Both Mr. and Mrs. Marshall talked
mon citizen again. "I think it will be about Washington life. "A clerk can
interesting, provided I can make some ossify there and become fit for the
money." Jokingly he said he was now Smithsonian Institute," said the for-
no better off than when he took the mer vice-president, while Mrs. Mar-
second highest office in the land eight shall's comment was: "Women have
years ago. "No man should go into very little to do there."
public life and expect to make mon-
ey - and still retain his .self re- SUMMER TERM ANNOUNCEMENT
spect," was his comment on the po- TO BE OFF PRESS WEDNESDAY
litician's outlook. -
Germany. WIl Pay The complete announcement for the
"Germany will either have to pay Summer session of 1921 will be off
the indemnity imposed upon her, or
cede territory to the allies," he said, the press by Wednesday. The an-
referring to the reoccupation of Ger- nouncement contains the faculty list,
man territory by armed forces. How description of courses, time and place
the situation ought to be handled, he of meeting of classes, and all other
would not say, because he declared it information relative to the summer
was his duty to withhold suggestions facilities
now that President Harding is di- T
recting affairs. The announcement will be on distri
"My only claim to being a public bution at the office of Registrar A. G
speaker is that I can talk loud enough Hall, and at the offices of the dean,
to keep people from going to sleep. I of the various schools and depart
decided to lecture a year and a half ments. Requests for the announce
ago when I knew the Democratic par- ment from parties outside of the Uni
ty was licked," he said. versity have been larger this year thai
R Recalls Libel Suit in any previous year, according t
He recalled the libel suit in which Dean E. H. Kraus.

PHOTOGRAPHERS NOTICE
Tryouts for assistant photo-
graphic editor of the Chimes are
needed at once. Those possess-
ing a camera with sufficient
speed to take action pictures call
F. E. Jacob, '21, at 920-R or see
L. E. Waterbury, '21L, at. the
Chimes office in the Union.

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