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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 10, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
FAIR; SLIGHTLY COLDER
TODAY

g i~~fr 4a

1Iaitj

ASSOJCIAT ED
PRESS
PAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXL No. 108.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 10, 1921.

PRICE IVE

PACKING UNIONS,
ASK HARDING TO
STOP WAGE CUTS.

ROGERS TO
AT J-LIT

PLAY
SMOKER-

MARSHALL CHOOSES
NATIONAL SUBJECT

"A" Students Find Campus Prompt
In Offering Hearty Congratulations

Two Boxing Matches Now Scheduled
For Tonight's Entertainment

In addition to the boxing bouts and Address Tonight Same as That Which

speeches which are on the program
for the smoker of the junior lits to be

BEEF CUTTERS AND BUTCHERS held at 7:30 o'clock to ight in the sec-

CHARGE ABROGATION OF
AGREEMENTS

MAY ASK GOVERNMENT
CONTROL OF INDUSTRY
Strike Thm1eatened if Corporations III-
sist on Return to "Barbaric
Conditions" of 1917
(By Associated Press)
Omaha, Neb., March 9.-President
Harding was called upon tonight to
settle his first big industr~ial problem
since his inauguration when repre-
sentatives of packing house' employes
sent him a telegram asking him to
prevent proposed wage reductions and
readjustments of working hours.
Samuel Gompers, president of the
American Fedeation of Labor, was
asked in another telegram to go tq
the White House as the direct repre-
sentative of the beef cutters union
and urge immediate action on the re-
quest. He was asked also to call a
meeting Monday in Chicago of all al-
lied unions working for the packers
to outline concerted action in event of
a strike.
Vote Unanimous
Delegates to the conference here
called by the amalgamated meat cut-
ters and butcher workmen of North
America voted unanimously late to-
day to appeal to the President in an
attempt to forestall abrogation of the
war time agreements between the
packers and their employees. The ac-
tion of the delegates who represent
the workers in every large packing
center affect 200,000 employees union
officials said.
The telegram to the President ask-
ed him to request the packers to hold
in abeyance the wage and hour chang-
es, announced as effective Monday, un-
til the secretary of labor can investi-
gate charges contained in the message.
The conference also adopted a resolu-
tion requesting the President to "use
his good offices to compel the packers
to comply with the agrement entered
into by the government and that un-
less the packers consent, that he ex-
ercise his power to' place the packing
house industry under government con-'
trol and operation and pubically
brand the present owners and man-
agers of the industry as a menace to
(Continued on Page Eight)
Sophomore Prom
Programs Arrive
Programs for the 1923 Sophomore
Prom to be held Friday night at the
Union have arrived from Wright and
company of Philadelphia. Consisting
of a brown leather cover for the men
and of a brown leather vanity case
for the women, the programs are en-
tirely different from those of other
Soph Proms.
The decoration of the Union assem-
bly hall is being undertaken by the,
Blu-Maize blossom shop. A general,
color schem of yellow will be e-
ployed in the decorating, which will
not be particularly lavish this year.
Nobe Wetherbee's orchestra will be
in the south part of the hall, so that
the music will be more evenly distrib-
uted over the dancing floor.
Flowers will be absolutely prohib-
ited at the party by a ruling of the,
committee made recently, and the
wearing of them to the Prom is dis-
couraged, as there will be no special
facilities provided for checking the;
corages at the door.

ond floor reading room of the Union,
music for the entertainment will be
furnished by-George . Rogers' Spot-
light orchestra. J. A. Bursley, Dean
of Students, will be the chief speaker
-of the evening and others including
President 0 W. Rush will be called
upon. 0
Besides the heavyweight boxing
match scheduled between Clarence
Pipp, '23, and F. H. Lauder, '21L, R. V.
Paton, '23, and M, Mills, '23E, each
weighing 138 pounds, will appear in
whatipromises to be a fast and well
balanced bout. Smokes and "eats"
make -up the balance of the program.
Committeemen are selling tickets
for the affair at 50 cents each. They
may also be secured at Graham's and
at the door.
"MAE SWIMMING
VARSITY SPORT"
- STUDENT COUNCIL
Committee Appointed to Get Measure
Through for Chcago Meet
March 18
CAMPUS TO VOTE WED. ON
STUDENT ADVISORY MEASURE
Every effort will be made by a com-
mittee appointed last night at the
meeting of the Student council to
have swimming decreed a minor Var-
sity sport, at Michigan, if possible in
time for competition in the Con-
ference meet at Chicago, Friday,
March 18.
The petition recently circulated
around the campus by the members
of the informal team has been signed
by about 4,000 men. Every "M" man
interviewed stated that he was heart-
ily in favor of the plan. Full details
of the abilities of the team and the
advantage that the University would
derive from having swimming a Var-
sity sport were described last night
to the council, every member of
which believed that the prowess and
interest of the present swimmers
warrants Michigan being represented
if possible in the coming meet, which
is the last of the season.
Swimmers'Abilty Emphasized
George Duffield, '24L, and Fred J.
Petty, '21, were appointed to investi-
gate every means for having this
measure put through so that the
team might be entered for the Chi-
cago meet by Friday, March 11. The
ability of the swimmers now eligible
at Michigan and probability of their
making a crditable showing at the
meet were the points emphasized most
strongly last evening and will prob-
ably be used in securing results.
Wednesday,. March 16, was set as1
the date for the campus election, at1
which the Student advisory committee
will be voted upon. Included on thel
ballot will be the names of the Ju-
niors and seniors who will serve on
the committee in the event of its ap-
proval by the student body and the
faculty. C. N. Johnston, '21E, will be
chairman of the election.
Spring Games Committee Named
F. L. Brewer, '21, chairman, Ros-
well Dillon, '21E, and H. E. Wilson,
'22, will be the committee for the
spring games. John C. Cary, '22L,
will have charge of the All-campus
spring election, which will be held
Wednesday, May 11.

Crowds Have Applauded in
Other Cities
FORMER VICE-PRESIDENT ON
TRANS-CONTINENTAL TOUR
"National Tendencies" is the sub-
ject on which Thomas R. Marshall
will speak at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium under the auspices of the
Oratorical association. This is the
topic M. Marshall is talking on in
his cross country tour and wherever
he has spoken large crowds have
flocked to hear him. Because of the
high office he has held during the last
eight years he is particularly fitted to
speak, on this subject.
Editorial Pays Tribute
A recent editorial in the New York
Times says of Mr. Marshall: "In spite
of that realistic democracy of the
senate, he has made himself liked and
respected as its presiding officer. He
has been impartial, alert, urbane. He
has grown steadily in the estimation
of the nation. While, like the rest of
us, he sometimes speaks unwisely, his
usual tone is one of almost frankli-
ness, shrewdness, sagacity, and unaf-
fected humor."
The former vice-president will ar-
rive from Cleveland some time this
afternoon and will leave directly after
the lecture for Chicago. Mr. and
Mrs. Marsall will be the guests of the
Delta Theta Phi law fraternity for
dinner tonight. Dean Alfred H. Lloyd
of the Graduate school will introduce
the speaker.
Feels Need 'of Rest
Mr. Marshall is on his way to the
Pacific coast and from there will go
to Europe. "For eight years"' he
said, serio-jocosely, a few weeks ago,
"I have been in the cave ,of the
winds. I need a rest."
GLEE CLUB ANNOUNCES,
SPRING TIP PROGRAM
Week-end trips for the Glee and
Mandolin clubs have been decided
upon, and schedules wereddrawn up
yesterday which include Jackson,
Kalamazoo, Battle Creek, Grand Rap-
ids and other state cities. The trips
will be taken during the fore part of
May, at about the same time as the
spring concert is given here.
To fill 10 places in the Glee culb
which have been lost by men who have
become ineligible, try-outs will be
held at 7:15 o'clock this. evening and
at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon in
room 308 of the Union. Tenor voices
are especially wanted. A rehearsal
will take place next Tuesday evening,
March 15, at the Union.
News of the Day
IN BRIEF
Washington, March 9.-A special
message was sent by President Hard-
ing to the senate today asking early
ratification of the $25,000,000 treaty
with Colombia.
Berlin, March 9.-The Belgians have
occupied Hanborn, to the north of
Duisburg and the coaling port of the
Thyssen works. The occupation was
without incident.
Duesseldorf, March 9.-General Ge-
gouttes, French commander, has pro-
claimed a state of siege and ordered

the surrender of all arms within 12
hours and prohibited strikes or
sabotage.

In response to the communication
published in The Michigan Daily of
March 8, in which it was stated that
all students who received all "A"
grades were "subject to the taunts
and ridicule of numerous lightweights
on the campus," a canvass of the stu-
dents who were so honore& has been
made to see if this alleged state act-
ually exists.
Ovation Surprising
The 30 students who received all
"A's" have been questioned and with
but one exception they have received
nothing but the most sincere congrat-
ulatiops for their endeavors. "I was
surprised at the ov.tion which I re-
ceived when my friends read in The
Daily that I had received good marks
EDUCATORS STRESS
MENTAL TESTS
Need of Teachers and Increased Pay
Also Emphasized at N. E. A.
Conference
STATE SCHOOL MEN SPEAK AT
BANQUET IN BURTON'S HONOR
"The place which measurement by
mental tests is assuming in education
together with the shortage of teach-
ers, the necessity of increased salaries
for teachers in all grades, and the
need of adequate facilities for pro-
moting rural education seemed to me
to be the things emphasized at the
National Education association con-
ference," said Prof. G. M. Whipple of
the educational department yesterday.
Delegates of the University who at-
tended the convention which began
Feb. 24 returned the early part of this
week.
Many Groups Meet
Practically every organization in
the country of any importance in an
educational way was represented at
the meeting. Sessions of representa-
tives of the city superintendentsrof
schools, Boy Scouts, Camp Fire Girls,
Educational Press associations of
America, School Garden associations,
and National Child Welfare associa-
tions show the diversity of the groups
which held their meetings in connec-
tion with the educational conference
proper.
Professor Whipple estimates the to-
tal attendance at between 5,000 and
6,000, and the number that took part
in the programs at more than 550.
Edmonson Elected to Office
Prof. J. B. Edmonson of the educa-
tional department was elected secre-
tary-treasurer of the National Associa-
tion of High School Supervisors and
Inspectors, and Professor Whipple
retained his position as secretary of
the National Society for the Study
of Education.
At the Michigan banquet which was
given in honor of President Marion!
L. Burton at the Breakers hotel Mon-
day evening, Prof. A. S. Whitney act-
ed as chairman and toastmaster. Miss
Grace Greenwood, President Charles
McKenny of Ypsilanti Normal, Charles
Poor, superintendent of schools at
Traverse City, and President Burton
were among the speakers of the even-
ing.
Garden Models Shown in Art Institute
Nine landscape garden models, made
by students of the landscape garden-
ing department of the University'
have been accepted as part of the an-

nual exhibit of architecture, land-
scape and garden design, and interior
decorations, showing this month in the
Chicago Art Institute under the au-
spices of Illinois architectural and
garden design associations.

in all my work," was the modest
statement of one of the University
women who received perfect grades in
all of her courses. One student said
that his friends had "rather joked
about his marks and made fun of
him." This was the only instance in
the 30 cases in which the writer of
the communication, published March
8, had any basis for his accusation.
"I do not think I care for any
further recognition," said another
student. "The privilege of receiving
all "A's" is sufficient compensation in
itself for the work spent in acquir-
ing that result." This seemed to be
the concensus of opinion among the
students interviewed.
Scholastic Recognition Exists
It was also stated in the communi-
cation that "the University could take
action along some line in the way of
honoring its worthy students that
would be greatly to its credit." At
present there are numerous organiza-
tions which recognize scholastic merit
and in which it is essential to have
received a remarkably high standing
before one can be received into mem-
bership.
It was further found that the stu-
dents who received all "A's" were, for
the great majority, connected with
some campus activity.
BURTON RESTING EASY
Speaking Dates Cancalled in Spite of
Slight Improvement Shown
The condition of President Marion
L. Burton remains practically un-
changed. He spent a restless night
Tuesday, but was more comfortable
yesterday morning. His temperature
showed a slight fall at that time.
Late yesterday afternoon he was
reported to be resting somewhat eas-
ier, and it was said that there had
been no complications of any kind.
Confidence was expressed that he will
soon begin to improve, but the fact
is recognized that he will be unable
to attend to any executive duties for
some time to come.
All speaking engagements which
President Burton had made for the
remainder of this month have been
cancelled. Included in the number
were the engagements to address the
state Rotary clubs in Saginaw on
March 17, and another to speak be-
fore the students of Vassar college
on March 20. Several local speaking
dates and others in the state were al-
so called off. It may be necessary
later for him to break engagements
for the first half of the month of
April.
D E AN BURSLEY :FA VORS
UPPEROLSS PROPOSITION
"If the students want to have priv-
ileges in the government of under-
graduate affairs, they must be willing
to accept responsibilities commensur-
ate with those privileges," was the
comment of J. A. Bursley, Dean of
Students, yesterday in regard to the
plan for the proposed student advisory
committee that was unanimously ac-
cepted by the upperclassmen Sunday
afternoon.
Dean Bursley further stated that
the proposed constitution looked fav-
orable to him. He believes that in
the event of its being voted upon fav-
orably by the campus at large and
then being accepted by the faculty,

the results desired would be secured.
An addition to the constitution
that was ?mitted in Tuesday's state-
ment is that the chairman of the
student advisory committee shall be
a senior who is not an ex-officio mem-
ber.

DIFFICULT ROLES
PLAYTED IN COMEDY11-
CLUB PRODUCTION
SCENERY, ESPECIALLY SECOND
ACT SETTING, WINS PRAISE
OF AUDIENCE
FRANCES MAIRE, '21, IS
STAR OF PERFORMANCE
Entire Cast Shares Equally for Second
Honors; Dialect Well
Handled
(By P. B. Beleamp)
Difficult roles, involving the use of
Scotch dialect throughout, were han-
Idled with a degree of finish which will
make the Comedy club's production
of "Bunty Pulls the Strings" one long
remembered by the audience which
filled the Whitney theater last night.
The play is one which would losue
too much in the retelling to permit
of a synopsis, but the delicacy of the
humor which characterizes the entire
story is one of its chief charms, and
this was made the most of by the en-
tire cast.
Frances Maire, '21, playing the lead
as Bunty, scored a signal success.
Bunty is a character which would
tax the skill of the most talented of
actresses, and the ovation with which
Miss Maire's presentation was greet-
ed, was sufficient testimony as to the
excellency of her work.
Clement Smith, '23, who as Wee-
lum Sprunt played opposite Miss
Mair'e, Carrie Smith, '21, asTessie
Dunlop, John Hassberger, '23, as Rab
Biggar, and Richard Forsythe, '22L, as
Tammas Biggar easily shared second
honors. The remaining members of
the cast sustained parts only slightly
inferior to those already mentioned
with a finish which was truly remark-
able.
To pass over "Bunty Pulls the
Strings" without making mention of
the scenery would be a mistake. The
Detroit scenic artist who did the work
produced a real bit of art in his re- .
production of the Lintiehaugh church-
yard, used in the second act.
Much praise is due to Prof. J. Ral-
eigh Nelson who directed the produc-
tion, which was one that should -as-
sure Comedy club plays a standing
second to none among future campus
theatricals.
LEGION DRIVE FOR
MEMBERS CLOSES
The American Legion membership
drive ended last night with a meeting
at the Union, where Lieut-Col. Guy M.
Wilson, commander of the depart-
ment of Michigan, delivered an ad-
dress on the function and purposes
of the American Legion.
Starting with the statement "His-
tory repeats itself," Colonel Wilson
recalled that but one service organi-
zation had survived each war - the
many others having failed. He then
told how the American Legion en-
deavored to serve all the service men,
whether members "of the Legion or
not, and emphasized the importance
of belonging to some service group.
He closed his address by showing
the members that the big men in busi-
ness and politics today were the or-
dinary boys of yesterday who did not

possess large opportunities but who
made their way by means of determi-
nation and singleness of purpose. He
also indicated the possible influence
that the service men might make if
they were united into one -organiza-
tion.
At the weekly meeting of the Ro-
tary club yesterday at the Union,
Colonel Wilson predicted a federal
hospital for soldiers to be located in

(Continued on Page Eight) -

0

I

ALL STAR
CAMPUS CAST

University Post VETERANS Of FOREIGN WARS Presents

ALL STAR
CAMPUS CAST

C'est

Ia

Guerre

Hill Auditorium

Written, Produced and Acted by Men Who Were "Over There"

Tues. Eve. Mar.15

TICKETS AT GRAHAM'S

50 Cents

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