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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 16, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER'OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
ty year by the Boatd in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
redited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
less matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building,- Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 966; Editorial, 24.14.
Communications not to exceed 3o0 words, if signedthe sig-
attire not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
ith, and notices of events will be. published in The Daily at the
scretioa of.-the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dail oflke.
nsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
cript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
essed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ANAGING EDITOR.........GEOROE O. BROPHY, JR.
ews Editor .........................Chesser M. Campbell
ight Editors-~-
T. H. Adams 1. W. Hitchcock
J. A. Bernstein J. E~. McManis
B. P. Campbell T. W. Sargent, Jr.
J. I. Dakin
:itorials........tee Woodruff, Robert Sage, C. H. Murchison
orts.. ....................................Robert Angell
ssistant News.. ....,.................E- P. Lovejoy.
nomen's Editor....................... .......Mary D Lane
elegraph.................................West Gallogly
Assistants
sephino Waldo Thomas J. Whinery Harry B. Grundy
ul G. Weber R. W. Wrobleski Winefred Blethan
hnena Barlow George Reindel Robert D. Sage
izabeth :Vickery Dorothy Monfort Marion Nichols,
I: Clark Minnie Muskatt Frances Oberholtzer

,,NY.

. K . %- bal

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...-.....LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
Advertising..................-.................. P. Joyce
Credits and Classified Ads...................... -1 R a ings
Publication.............E.M--iear
Accounts,..............................ER.Pih
Circulation ...................................C PSchneider
Assistats
R. W. Lanibrecht B. G. Cower Lester W. Milard
Roert 0. Kberr Sigmund Kunstadter V . F ]Hillerylr
The night editors for this week will be: Monday
night, Hugh Hitchcock ; Tuesday night, T. W.
Sargent, Jr.; Wednesday night, B. P. Campbell;
Thursday night, T. H. Adams; Friday nigh, J. I.
Dakin ; Saturday night, J. A. Bernstein.
Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
o * all news to be printed that niggtd.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1920.
KNOW YOUR UNIVERSITY'
The presidents of the University of Michigan
have been Rev. Henry Philip Tappan, D.D., LL.D.,
1852-1863; Rev. Erastus Otis Haven, D.D., LL.D.,
1863-1869; Henry Simmons Frieze; acting presi-
dent 1869-1871, and also during President Angell's
absence as U. S. Minister to China, 1880-1882;
James Burrill Angell, LL.D., 1871-1909; Harry
Burns Hutchins, LL.D., 1910-1920; Marion L. Bur-
ion, Ph.D., LL.D., 1920-.
GOOD AFTERNOON, M. A. C.
Once a year we forget the appellation, "cow col-
fege ;" forget the college student's traditional
scorn of the smaller institution, lay aside all our
jokes and age-old quips about the "Aggies", and
come down to Ferry field in deadly earnest, know-
ing it's just a question of eleven of our men against
eleven of theirs. In the seldom broken string of
Michigan victories over our state rivals, there has
never been a game in which the East Lansing team
has not played football to the final whistle, and we
welcome today a resp~ected adversary.
Every Michigan manl and woman knows in the
bottom of his or her heart that this afternoon's
game is not going to be any repetition of the '13
and '15 setbacks. We helieve in the Varsity *and
its ability to carry off the field a football on which
.will: be, pailted the score of another victory. But
the spirit which makes us loyal to Michigan is the
same which gives us the red-blooded desire to see
a real football game between fighting teams. That
is why we are glad to witness again the intrastate
football .classic, and glad that the M. A. C. game
comes at a time when our guests, the great educa-
tors of America and the world, can ejov the con-
test with tis.
THREE "CLEAN HINTS"
New York City has a model system of maintain-
itg cleanliness in its many hotels and restaurants,
and it is the aim of the University Health service,
as far as possiblc, to pattern local methods of san-
itation after those in effect in the metropolis. San-
itation is a matter of great importance ,especially
as concerns the health of the student body, and
it is with the view of impressing its significance on
proprietors of Ann Arbor eating establishments, as
well as students, that the Health service has compiled
a statement of so-called "clean hints."
There are three outstanding features in this list,
on all of which insistence should be made by pa-
trons in order that a true sanitary code may be
permanently instituted. The first of these concerns
milk. Pasteurized milk is always safe, and al-
though raw milk is not always unhealthy, it is an
exceptional dairy which never produces contamin-
ated raw milk.
Secondly, only persons who are of sound health
should be employed as food handlers, for there is
always the danger of transmission, either directly
or indirectly, of contagious diseases like diphtheria
and typhoid fever.
The third point for consideration is that ordi-
nary dishwashing is unsatisfactory, and that all

dishes, after the regular washing, should again be
placed in boiling water for several minutes.
The students can back the Health service by per-
sonal investigation and insistence upon observance
of these rules at their own eating places.
STOP THE AIR PERIL
There were several thousand of us at Ferry field
last Saturday. As during nearly every football
game in the last three years, airplanes, two of them
this time, flew over the field. One of them executed
some fancy "stunts" above the grandstands. Few
would argue that "stunting" of itself is reprehensi-
ble, but almost anyone would admit that, practiced
as it was above the Case game crowd, it should be
stopped.
Regardless of the ability of the aviator, no man
has the right to endanger needlessly the lives of
others. The man flying that airplane arrogated that
right to himself, when he side-slipped and looped
directly above a crowded grandstand.
Should an accident occur and the plane drop, the
people below it would have no chance of escape.
Some of them would be crushed beneath the heavy
engine; others would be injured by the wings;
many more would be trampled upon with possibly
fatal results during the panic which would inevita-
bly accompany the accident should it occur. Such
a contingency, remote as it undoubtedly is, should
be eliminated by every means within the power of
the city and University.
THE CHECKING PRIVILEGE
It was not long ago that student checking ac-
counts were zealously bid for by the local banks
who have built branches near the campus. Now
"no checks less than ten dollars" is the dictum of
one of them. This marks another step in the cur-
tailment of the service students wish to receive from
institutions of this class, as a five dollar minimum
was established last year.
The privilege of making checks for small sums is
a distinct advantage to anyone attending college.
Without it, purchasing is made more difficult for
both buyer and seller. Storekeepers must provide
funds to cash all checks which may be turned in,
and when their cash runs low students who would
pay for a three or four dollar article by check must
take the trouble to convert it into money as best
they can. At times this is impossible when the
article is needed most. Once out of the bank, the
difference (which is seldom very much these days)
between a ten dollar check and the cost of a book,
for example, is soon spent and unaccounted for.
Because it is convenient, promotes careful spend-
ing and saving, and is the most important basis of
student accounts, the system of unrestricted checks
should be revived. Those benefiting by it should be
willing to pay a reasonable sum for the privilege.
We cordially invite the Directory staff to ask The
Daily staff to attend a ball to be held in the Direc-
tory beauty parlors.
The .Telescope

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect June 1, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor ad Jackson
(Eastern Standard T'ime)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:10 a. m. and hourly to
9: 10 p. Mn.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also11:00 p.-n. To Ypsilanti enly,
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 aim. and 1:10 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m .,and
12:10 p.m.
I011 1 '1 m um

-n

OUR SODAS
AND SUNDAES
ARE THEY GOODT
I'LL SAY THEY ARE

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custon-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources ........$5,000,000.00

II

FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH
Corner State and Liberty

Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

OCTOBER
S De T W T F S
1 2
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

An nouncem "ent

GRAHAM 1
two STORES
hooks and upplies'for all Colleges at
Iloth Stores

..r

Both Ends of Diagonal Walk

We are in a position to furnish you with the
best meats on the market. We shall be glad
to have you call us. Phone 1091
The CENTURY Market
213 North Main St.

I

I

Dean Cooley Urges Liberal Study
In a recent talk to the freshmen of
the Engineering college, Dean Mor-
timer E. Cooley advised them to
carry as much general academic
work as their schedules would per-
mit, in order that their viewpoint and
horizon might be broadened.
To enable the engineering student
to receive in the future a more liberal
education, Dean Cooley stated that
the idea of extending the period of
instruction for engineers to five or
six years is being seriously contem-
plated. Such a plan would make the
Engineering colelge curriculum sim-
ilar to plans in vogue at other profes-
sional schools.
Absentee-Voters Given Last Chance
Absent voters in Michigan have
their last chance today to register if
they are to vote in the November
presidential elections. All forms must
be in the hands of the city clerks by
12 o'clock Saturday night including
the registration affidavits.
Voters form New York state must
have forms made out by noon today if
they wish to vote. Forms for regis-
tration may be obtained from the Re-
publican club headquarters.
Daxce tonight, Packard Academy.-
Adv.
UNDERWOOD'S

If i

'I

999
Q
F-
999

TAXI

999

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service
enough said

TAXI

999

1

Up the.

Stairs

in Nickel's Arcade

Help! Help! the Telescope
"Father, who is that solemn man
Who looks deprived of hope ?"
"That, son, is the comic editor
"Who writes the Telescope."
An Unmarketable Speciaky
Miss M. Shellhorn, dressmaker. Coeds
cialty.-Daily ad.

TO THE

Arcade Ca-feteria

a spe-

Yes, Clarice, you are quite right when you state
that fellow has a lot of crust who imagines he is
college bred because he loafs on his father's
nwoney.
NEXT!
A frosh I like
Is John .McBloke,
Who never says,
"Gimme a smoke."
Wool-What are you doing in Ann Arbor now,
Sack?
Sack-I'm thinking of opening a "movie" here
where one could see a good show for a fair price.
Do you think I'll succeed?
Wool-Undoubtedly. You won't have any com-
petition in your line.
Dear Noah :
I have a daughter attending the University who
is tongue tied. What shall I have done for her?
Troubled Father.
Absolutely nothing. Man should never try to
interfere with the workings of Providence.
He-Would you care to go to the show at the
Whitney tonight?
She-Oh, I'd just love to. What's the bill?
He'(doing some mental arithmetic)--Roughly
speaking about $6.oo.
Today's nominee for the R. 0. 0. C. is the low-
brow who gives vent to a long drawn out whistle
when he thinks some scene at the movies requires
that he evince surprise, pleasure or some kindred
emotion..
Famous Closing Lines
"A crying evil," said the lleacherite as he listened
to the peanut vender in the stands.
NOAH COUNT.

L. C. SMITH'S
REMINGTONS
WOODSTOCKS

OLIVERS

FOR SALE OR RENT

Where you may select your meal from
a forty-foot table steaming with a va
riety of all kinds of pure food delicious-
ly cooked by experts. Bakery goods
fresh from our own ovens.
Our Special Blend of Coffee with Jer-
sey cream is exceptional.

HAMILTON BUSINESS
COLLEGE
State and William Streets
MULLISON'S
RIDING
STABLES
Saddle Horses
By the Hour
AILSO
Driving Horses
Single and Double Rigs
326 EAST !1NN STRET

i

Economy of Cafeteria service
bles us to serve at low prices.

ena-

1

C. J. FINGERLE.

Dinner 11:30 to 1 P.M.

Supper 5:30 to 7 P.M.

ANN ARBOR,
MICH.

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