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October 16, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-16

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS;
COOLER TODAY

*A

P43ail

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. NO. 11. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1920. PRICE THREE CENTS
r r

EDUCATIONAL LEADERS ADDRESS
CONFERENCE ON CONSTRUCTIVE
MEASURES FOR REAJUSTMENT

DR. A. ROSS HILL SEES JUNIOR
COLLEGE AS RELIEF FOR
CONGESTION
SPEAKERS ANSWER FOUR
UNIVERSITY PROBLEMS
Differentiation of Educational Units
and Co-operation Conferences
Urged
Four constructive measures were
considered yesterday afternoon by the
educational conference as a means of
solving the problems land. bringing
about the needed readjustments that
had occupied the attention of the
conference during the preceding ses-
sions.
Speaking on "The Junior College
Movement," Dr. A Ross Hill, presi-
dent of the University of Missouri,
found in the junior college relief from
the congestion with which state uni-
versities throughout the country are
now suffering. The duty of the ju-
nior college, the speaker declared, is
to supplement the work of the ele-
mentary schools and to prepare its
students for technical and profession-
al education.
Predicts Increase
"During the last decade there has
been a widespread movement to re-
quire two years of college work be-
fore admitting students to the profes-
sional schools," Dr. Hill said. "The
south seems to be the favorite field
for development of private junior
colleges. California and Missouri
have the system most widely devel-
oped in connection with the public
educational facilities'
That the number f junior colleges
will rapidly increase was the predic-
tion of Dr. Hill, who added the warn-
ing that communities of less than 50,-
000 population should proceed with
caution in the establishment of such
schools.
Junior colleges will encourage many
students who cannot attend state uni-
versities to secure broader general
and vocational education, he said and
for the universities there will be re-
lief from the present preponderant
number of freshmen and sophomores.
Dual Purpose
Dr. Hill pointed out the need of
careful supervision of the Junior cur-
riculum to make it conform with uni-
versity requirements, and at the same
time to be fitted for those not prepar-
ing for work in higher institutions.
When the junior college becomes a
vocational training school, it severs
its connection with the university, he
added.
The problem of differentiation of the
units of the educational system to meet
the needs of varying types of students
was discussed by Dr. Charles A.
Prosser, director of the William
Hood Dunwoody institute. The home,
the church, the farm, and the shop are
all educational factors, but to the.
public schools society must look as
the final custodian of childhood, Dr.
Prosser asserted. He said that to
meet the task set upon it by society,
the educational system is required to
become a system, notf of uniformity,
but of differentiation and adapatation
so the children may make the best of
their opportunities.
Predicts Changes
Predicting that . we are "on the
threshold of pronounced changes,"
Dr. Prosser stated that differentiation
in studies is not undemocratic, and
that vocational adaptation will lessen
the drift between economic classes.
The adolescent stage is where the
great demand for differentiation

comes, he continued. "Educators are
responding to the new demands of so-
cial economy as rapidly as the facili-
ties of schools permit."
Donald J. Cowling, president of
Carleton college, delivered an address
on "Co-operation Between Colleges
and Universities." He stated that all
institutions should not become of the
same type, national security being bet-
ter served by a multiplicity of types.
"Don't eliminate the college from the
university, or let the separate college
die, but strengthen both," he sug-
gested. "In the effort to make train-
ing practical, don't neglect to make it
(Continued on page Six)

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA RE-
GENT SPEAKS THIS
MORNING
ACADEMIC ASSEMBLY
CLOSES LAST NIGHT

Luncheon for Regents Last Event
Program of Inaugural Con-
ference

on

The last of the conferences in con-
nection with the inauguration of Pres-
ident Marion I,. Burton having been
held yesterday, one of the greatest ed-
ucational events of the year draws to
a close. A meeting of the Regents
of state universities and a luncheon
for representative Regents are the
only gatherings slated for today.
At a meeting of the Regents of state
universities which is to be held at
9:30 o'clock this morning in the Un-
ion, Charles L. Sommers, Regent of
the University of Minnesota, is to
speak on the topic, "The Salary Prob-
lem." The Hon. Theodore M. Ham-
mond, Regent of the University of
Wisconisn, is to take as his subject,
"Student Fees and Tuition Charges."
A discussion of the problems confront-
ing governing boards will follow.
Traces Growth
At a morning meeting on the second
day of the conference Lotus D. Coff-
man, president of the University of
Minnesota, addressed Oe delegates
on the subject of "The Growth of the
State University." In his speech he
traced the growth of these institu-
tions up to the present, bringing to
light many interesting facts.
That the universities of the country,
and especially the state universities,
are facing as great a crisis today as
they did two and one-half years ago,
was the warning sounded by Dr. Sam-
uel P. Capen, speaking on the topic,
"The Cost of Higher Education and
Its Bearing on Taxation."
"The future of the state higher in-
stitutions is intimately bound up with
the development of state taxation. Ex-
isting methods and apportionment of
taxes have either already failed, or
will shortly fail to yield the amounts
required by the Xising cost of state
institutions."
Blames Graduate Schools
Dr. Frederick J. E. Woodbridge of
Columbia university, taking as his
subject, "The Supply of Adequately
Trained University Teachets," was
the third speaker on the program. In
the present system of education he
found the cause 'or the present dearth
of properly trained teachers, blaming
especially the graduate schools of the
country from which come a great ma-
jority of the nation's educators.
"Our present system of education,"
said Dr. Woodbridge, "produces a
man quick and alert to stimuli, but
not possessing that peculiar mind
which goes to make up the real schol-
ar." . The speaker said that if he
were constructing what he considered
an ideal graduate school he would
make one in which students could
study whatever they wished when
they wished and as much as they
wished. He made a plea for intellect-
ual freedom in graduate schools.
Money for Credits
"We are wasting much of our
teacher's time," went on the. speak-
er, "and much money in keeping in-
competent students up to a passing
grade." In many cases he said that
he felt students did not consider the
tuition which they paid as money
which went to partially defray the ex-
penses of the institution but as the
price of getting certain credits.
Prof. Vernon Kellogg, secretary of
the national research council, the last
speaker on the program said:
"Anything which lessens the inter-
est and activities of the universities
(Continued on Page Six)
PAPERS WILL fiE SOLD
A number of copies of Thurs-
day's paper which were ordered

In advance have not been called
{for. These papers are in great '
demand and will notrbe reserv-
ed later than 10 o'clock this
morning.'

JGovernment Quits
Profiteer Drive
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 15.-The govern-
ment drive against the high cost of
living, abandonment of which has
been set Nov. 1, has cost approxi-
mately $500,000, according to figures
at the department of justice, which
today sent letters to all fair-price or-
ganizations informing them of the
conclusion of the campaign.
Department officials said the drive
had been successful, but that lack of
funds had forced the decision to dis-
solve the organization. They pointed
to collections of fines aggregating
more than $275,000, assessed against
convicted profiteers as evidence of the
success attained. Convictions totalled
181 records of the department show-
ed.
Further fines might be collected, it
was said from more than 1,600 per-
sons and firms indicted through the
activities of the fair-price groups.
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR
CAD WELLHELD TODAY
AUTOMOBILE VICTIM'S FATHER
AND SISTR ARRIVE IN
ANN ARBOR
Funeral services for George A. Cad-
well, Jr., '21L, who died Thursday aft-
ernoon as the result of injuries re-
ceived in an automobile accident near
the county infirmary, will be held 'at
11 o'clock this morning from the Phi
Alpha Delta house, 1223 Hill street.
Reverend Lloyd C. Douglas, of the
Congregational church, will officiate.
President Marion L. Burton, who
knew Miss Helen Cadwell, sister of
the deceased, while president of
Smith college, will be present at the
services.
Other Victim in Hospital
Miss Cadwell arrived in Ann Ar-
bor late Thursday afternoon from
Grand Rapids where she was visiting
a classmate. She had been a guest of
Miss Thelma Bang, '21, financee of the
deceased, here earlier in the week.
Elizabeth Carter, '23, of Hunting-
ton, West Virginia, another victim of
the tragedy, is at St. Joseph's sanitar-
ium suffering from a badly wrenched
back and possible internal injuries.
Anderson Meadows, special law stu-
dent, also a member of the party, is at
a private home in the city, recovering
from the nervous shock of the accid-
ent. Aside from a badly gashed fore-
head and bruised arms, he is uninjur-
ed.
Father of Cadwell Here
George A. Cadwell, father of the de-
ceased, arrived in Ann Arbor late yes-
terday afternoon from New Britain,
Conn. Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Haensel, of
Port Huron, Mich., father and mother
of Miss Thelma Bang, fiancee of the
deceased, arrived here yesterday
morning to be with their daughter
who is prostrate over the affair.
The burial will take place in West
Hartford, Conn., next Tuesday. A rep-
resentative from Phi Alpha Delta and
from Delta Tau Delta will accompany
the remains.
LATE WIRE BRIEFS
(By Associated Press)

Zurich, Oct. 15.-According to an
announcement of the German foreign
ministry, a great revolt is reported
to have started in Moscow. The Kim-
lin there is declared to have been in-
vaded.
Warsaw, Oct. 15.-Gen. Joseph Pil-.
sudski, president of the republic of
Poland, tendered his resignation as,
chief executive today. At the request,
of the government, however, he with-
drew his resignation provisionally.
General Pilsudski was named presi-
dent of Poland by the national as-
sembly in February, 1919. He had
been the military leader of the Poles,
and previous to the reconstruction of
the government by Ignace J. Padrew-
ski, as premier, he was the dictator
of Poland. General Pilsudski led the
successful counter offensive of the'
Poles against the Bolshevikis, which
drove the Russian Soviet forces from,
the gates of Warsaw and later from
Polish soil.

M. A. g. OPPOSES
WOLVERINES TODAY
Farmers Hope to Wreck Michigan's
Season at Outset by Winning
This Afternoon
MUCH DEPENDS ON WORK OF
MAIZE AND BLUE LINEMEN
THE LINE-UPS
Michigan Position M. A. C.
Cappon .......L.E ...........Bassett
Goetz (Capt.) .L.T............. .Bos
Dunne........L.G........Swanson
or Johns or Matson
Vick .......... C.......Morrison or
Martin
Wilson or Johns R.G........Radewald
Wieman .......R.T........... Leffler
Goebel ........ R.E.......Gingrich or
Thompson
Dunn .........Q.B. .Springer (Capt.)
Usher ......... L.H....... Johnson or
Wilcox
Perrin or Cohn R.H... Shiver or Brady
Steketee ......F.B..........Hammes
Followers of Michigan football will
have their first opportunity to see the
Wolverines in action against a team of
nearly equal ability this afternoon,
when the Michigan Aggies play the
Varsity on Ferry field.
Strong where Michigan is weak,
and weak where the Yostmen show
power, M: A. C. is coming with a

TODAY'S PROGRAM
9:30 a. m.--Meeting of regents
of state universities, Michigan
Union.
1. "The Salary Problem," Hon.
Charles. L. Sommers, regent
of the University of Minne-
sota.
2. "Student Fees and Tuition
Charges," Hon. Theodore M.
Hammond, regent of the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin.
3. Discussion of, problems con-
cerning the governing boards
of universities.
12:30 p. m.--Luncheon for rep-
resentative regents of state
universities at the Union.
EDUCATION REFORM'
Harvard President Advocates New
Examination Pur-
pose
DECLARES U. S. STANDARDS
OF EDUCATION LACIKING
"We have met here not only to par-
ticipate in the inauguration or Mr.
Burton as the new president of the
University of Michigan, and to ex-
press our hope and confidence in the'

DANIELS STARTS
INVESTIGATION O
"HAITI KILLINGS"
RESPONSIBILITY OF AFFAIRS
PLACED ON MAJOR
WELLS
REPORT NEVER REACHED
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
Colonel Russell Expresses Doubt as
to Whether Evidence Secured
WAS Sufficient
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 15. - Secretary
Daniels announced today that he had
appointed a board of inquiry to make
a thorough investigation "of all
wrongs alleged to have been commit-
ted in Haiti, and particularly the
reference to indiscriminate killings,"
In Brig. Gen. George Barnett's confi-
dential letter, of a year ago, to Col.
John H. Russell, marine commander
in Haiti.
Makes Report Publie
Secretary Daniels, at the same time,
made public Colonel Russell's report
on the investigation ordered by Qen-
eral Barnett. "Although dfrected to
the department of state on March 13,
1920, the report never reached there,"
the secretary said, "until brought
back by MaJ. Gen. Lejeune, comand-
ant of the corp, on his recent return
from Haiti."
Placed Responsibility on Wells
Colonel Russell's report on the in-
vestigation ordered by General Bar-
nett, placed the responsibility of "con-
ditions" in Northern Haiti on Major
Clarke H. Wells, who had previously
been in command of that district. Ex-
pressing doubt as to whether evidence
secured in the investigation was "suf-
ficient to warrant trial by general
court martial on charges of a serious
nature," Cohnel Russell recommended
that the evidence be placed before the
iudge advocate general of the navy for
,leternination, as to whether the of-
icers should be tried. The report said
that witnesses before the investiga-
tion showed "a serious bandit situa-
ton" in Northern Haiti, which was
"badly handled" by Major Wells.
CO-OPERTION WANTED

twice defeated eleven, but one which future of that great institution; but'

will fight to the last ditch, and which
is, in addition, now engaged in its,
big game of the season, a factor add-
ing much to the fight of the team.
Coach Potsey Clark has done much to-
ward the perfection of the defense
since the Wisconsin game, and as he
has not had a great deal of worry any
time this year over the offense, he
considers his squad in a good posi-
tion to wreck the Michigan season at
the start.
Comparison with Badgers
This will also be the first opportu-
nity to get a line on Michigan's rank-
ing in the Conference, as some com-
parison may be made after the game,
with the Badger team that downed the
Aggies last week, 27 to 0.
With the practice that the Michigan
line has been given this week, it
should show to more advantage than
against Case, when the main weakness
was a lack of teamwork. Now that
(Continued on page Three)
BANQUET AT UNION
ENDS CONFERENCE
The educational conference culmin-
ated last night with a banquet in the
assembly hall of the Union to dele-
gates, invited guests, and faculty mem-
bers of professorial rank and their
wives.
President M. L. Burton was toast-
master.
In the first address of the evening
President A. Lawrence Lowell, of
Harvard, stressed the need for more
thoroughness in academic work.
Consciousness of the state univer-
sity was the theme of the speech by
President Birge, of the University of
Wisconsin. He paid tribute to the
part the late Dr. James Burrill An-
gell took in developing this conscious-
ness.
Dr. Harry A. Garfield, president of
Williams college and former United
States fuel administrator, discussed
the college as furnishing to a greater
extent than the university the back-
ground of our lives. He remarked
that if the United States government
does not carry out to a full measure
the faith our soldiers had in it, until
we join hands with the world, the
complete failure of all our college
days ought to have taught us must be
admitted.
Co-operation of the university with
the public school system of the state
was urged by Hon. T. E. Johnson, su-
perintendent of public instruction for
the state of Michigan.
Eight members of the Detroit sym-
phony orchestra furnished music dur-
ing the evening. The assembly hall
was extensively decorated, and be-
hind the speakers' table hung the ban-
ners of Smith college, the University
of Minnesota, and the University of
Michigan, the three institutions Dr.
Burton has setved as president.

also to take an account of stock in
the educational progress of the na-
tion," said Dr. A. Lawrence Lowell,
president of Harvard university,
spearking last night at the banquet
given in the Union to delegates and
invited guests of the educational con-
ference, and to faculty members.
"Everyone will admit that the
present condition of education in this'
country has its merits and is de-
fects," he continued. "The product of
our schools and collegesshows a re-
markable degree of resourcefulness
and adaptability. This may not be
wholly due to our edrucational system,
but in part to the environment, which
tends to develop these qualities in our
people; for they are shown also by
men whose systematic education has
been exceedingly limited. Neverthe-
less, it is easy to underrate the effects
of schooling. Men often attribute far
too little to their instruction, and too
much to their own inherent qualities.
It is not only certain that our educa-
tion has not tended to diminish natur-
al resourcefulness and adaptability,
but these very traits have been shown
most markedly among college-bred
men, as was seen among our college
graduates in the late war.
(Continued on page Four)
Here 's :football
Dope For Todbay
(By Associated Press )
Chicago, Oct. 15.-Although every
football eleven in the Western Con-
ference will be engaged in battle to-
morrow, chief interest centers in the1
contest between towa and Illinois
at Urbana, which is expected to de-
velop into one of the hardest fought
contests of the season.
The Illinois eleven, winner of the
1919 championship of tb"F Big Ten,
will go into the game with a squad- of
veteran players, but Iowa holds a
slight advantage as a result of two
early season's games. The =iawkeyes
are reported to be in mid-season form
and ready for a bruising contest.
Having beaten Cornell college and In-
diana, Iowa is recognized as a con-
tender for the western honors.
Northwestern, whose surprising up-
set of Minnesota a week ago has made
this eleven a dark horse in the cam-
paign, will take the field against Wis-
consin at Madison. Ohio State's show-
ing against Purdue tomorrow will be
watched with interest, because of the
important games from the Buckeye
sche'dule later this month.
Chicago and Michigan will play non-
Conference elevens; Chicago taking
on Wabash while Michigan meets the
Michigan Aggies.

SETWEEN SCHOOL

LFI
FISH~

M. I. T. TRUSTEE WANTS ACTUAL
CONDITIONS BROUGHT TO
STUDENT LIFE
Need for close co-operation between
the present educational system and the
vital activitieshof life, and toe way
leading to such co-operation furnish-
ed the theme for the address of Hon.
Frederick P. Fish, trustee of the
Massachusetts Institute of Technolo-
'y, at the aession yesterday afternoon
of the educational conference.
Pointing out that! for generations
there was no education for man except
,hat obtained by contact with environ-
ment and by the example of those more
experienced in life, and that the mod-
ern educational system 'has now as-
sumed controlpof youth at an early age
and is responsible in great part for his
growth, the speaker insisted that the
complexity of the present educational
organization and its machine-like char-
acter has a tendency to keep the stu-
dent from learning in the old way from
environment and hinders him from
making a real contact with life,
(Continued on Page 5)
DIRECTORY GOES TO HANDS
OF PRINTERS THIS MORNING
After two weeks of work, all editing
of the Students directory came to a
close last night, according to John R.
Reilly, '21E, managing director. The
directory goes Into the hands of the
printers this morning and it is hoped
by the editors that it will be ready for
sale in about three weeks time.
It contains the names of more than
8,000 in all, as well as the usual fea-
tures, such as the Ypsilanti Normal
college.

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