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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESJ

,

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Fntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ceoss matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
naturenot nonecessarily to appear in print but as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No man.
uscript will be returned unless the writer inclses postage.
The Daily does 'not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex.
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITOBIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR .......* ...GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor..............-........... Chesser M. Campbell
Night Editors-
N T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
ReI Dakin J . McManis
enaud Sherwood 'T. W. Sargent, Jr .
Sunday Editor..............................J. A. Bernstein
City Editor .. ........B PCampbell
Editor~als............ .Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
#orts ....... ............................. Robert Angell
women's Editor...........................Mary D. Lane
Telegraph....................................Thomas Dewey
Telescope ............... .............. .....Jack W. Kelly

Josephine Waldo
Paul G. Weber
Elizabeth Vickery
G. X. Clark
George Reindel
Dorothy MIonfort
Harry 1,Grundy
FrancesOberholtzer
Robert . Adas
George L. Stone

Assistants
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. Hershdorfer
Hughston McBain
Frank H. McPike
SA. Bacon
. .Ottaway
Paul Watzel
3. W. Hlume, Jr.
Byron Darnton
Mr A. Klaver

E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery-
Gerald P. Overton
tdward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sa Wiailer
H. E . Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 980
BUSINESS MANAGER ...-......LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Advertising ...... ............................D. P. Joyce
Classifieds.. .. .........................Rot. 0. Kerr
P u b l i c a t i o n . . . . . . . . . --- -. .- - - - " - . 'i r i a
ubiain......... .. ....... _"....... ........FP. M. Heath
Accounts ...................E R. Priehs
Circulation..................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
R. W. jambrecbt P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
B. G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
Lester W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
L JL Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

unconscious, and we like to think that often they are
not noticed,but it is our belief that when this Chi-
cago educator attempts to overturn the established
rules of grammar and to sneak in solecisms and
flagrant errors under the guise of good usage, it is
time to call a halt.
There is no single thing which so quickly places
the stigma of "uneducated" upon a man as inability
to use correct speech. He may have the knowledge
of the world tucked away in his brain, but if he can-
not speak his "own language correctly, he will never
receive the credit of being an educated man. It is
difficult to attempt to censure the use of slang. It
is perfectly true that some slang expressions have
so worked themselves into the vocabulary of Amer-
icans that they have come to be perfectly correct,
just as there are many other phrases which one
should never use if he is making any sort of an at-
tempt at goqd speech.I
Errors of grammar, however, are inexcusable. If
our speech is not necessarily pure, at least it can be
correct, and we can avoid the use of expressions
which we know - or at least, which we ought to
know -- to be absolutely incorrect. To an educated
man, the use of "he don't" or of "it is me" grates
just as much as does "I ain't" or "I seen." Any
teacher who would tell his pupils that the use of the
expressions, reported as countenanced by the Chi-
cago educator, are in correct usage, is no fit person
to hold in his hand the education of growing boys
and girls of the United States.
AN INTERESTED LEGISLATURE
The rumors current about the campus concerning
the proposed merger of the University and Homoe-
opathic hospitals indicate that many do not clearly
understand the changes contemplated.
Briefly, the hospital consolidation bill was intro-
duced by Senator Townsend, of Jackson, and is in
the form of a recommendation providing that the
two institutionsshall be merged at the discretion of
the Board of Regents. The bill contains no criti-
cism of any nature whatever.
While it is true that the land grant of 1902 by
the city of Ann Arbor to the Homoeopahic hospi-
tal provides that the property shall not be used for
any other purpose, a far more serious difficulty Is
that the mill-tax enactment of 1907 provides specifi-
cally for the existence of the various departments
and divisions of the corporation. Any change, such
as that contemplated, would result in the automatic
reduction of the mill-tax (the chief source of rev-
-enue) from three-eights to one-twentieth of a mill.
The insufficiency of even the present funds is only
too well recognized.
With this statement of the facts any erroneous
impression should be corrected. The bill was drafted
'by Senator Townsend, for many years a prominent
member of the medical profession and a legislator
who has the well-being of the state's most impor-
tant public trust at heart. The proposed recommen-
dation has passed the lower house and, should it pass
the senate, will be given the most earnest consier-
ation of the Board of Regents.
Michigan is glad to see the interest taken by the
law-makers, and the gentlemen at Lansing may be
assured that the University authorities on their part
welcome and appreciate so real a concern.
Tne Telescope
The Bald- Truth

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
ssueoof TheDaily should see thenight editor, who has full charge
of allnews to be printed that night.
TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1921.
Night Editor-JOHN I. DAKIN.
The editorial- staff and tryouts will meet at 5
o'clack this afternoon.
UP TO THE CAMPUS
Michigan's greatest opportunity to secure an ad-
vanced form of student self government which
eventually should be a real guarantee of student ad-
ministration and co-operation is embodied in the
constitution approved by Sunday's upperclass meet-
ing in the Union and about to be presented to the
student body at large at a special campus election
in the near future.
The scheme is in the highest degree comprehen-
sive, meeting the chief problers which have caused
so much dissension and which have been beyond
the power of the present system, with its small ratio
of co-operation, to control. The 'student advisory
committee proposed in the plan would be elected by
Sthe same.ballot which approves the new proposals;
it Would take office at once and the first step toward*
genuine student self-government would be taken.
The upperclassmen passed the recommendations
unaninmodsly. A similar vote of confidence by adop-
tion of the constitution by the entire student body
will naturally give tremendous weight of opinion to
the plan and also show that the rules, once agreed
otn by the faculty, will take genuine effect through
the respect of those who sponsored them. Every
Michigan man should recognize this great opportu-
nity to make student self-government a real and ac-
tive factor in University life. It is our duty to
read the recommendations through critically and
cast an intelligent vote when the plan is put to the
campus. ,
IP NOT PURE, CORRECT
Some time ago the president of one of the greater
women's colleges of the East was quoted as giving
a dissertationeupon the use of slang, and if memory
fail not, his censure of its use was not too strong.
'"The uses of slang," he said, "are the by-ways of
.speech. We use slang for the same reason that we
gross the grass: because it is the shortest route to
our destination." He goes on, in a most learned
manner, to explain the classic origin of many of
our slang words and phrases, and winds up by
pointing out the truth of his former statement that
slang is "the shortest way around."
"The Englishman," he claims, "would grope
through several paragraphs in an attempt to- de-
scribe Sir Oliver Lodge. The American looks him
over - says 'high-brow' - and there you have it.
And all this leads us, by rather a devious process
to be sure, to the statement made by a Chicago
school teacher a short time ago, in which the worthy
scion of education expressed the opinion that con-
" stant usage had established such phrases as "he
don't," "I will" as a simple future tense, and "it is
me,7;as correct.
As a sule, we have not the reputation of being
purist in our speech. We may even may little er-
rors ourselves now andthen and we do not make the
boast of the lady in the story who stated proudly,
"I ain't never made but one grammatical mistake,
and I seen that one as soon as I done it," but we do
stand out now and then for a few of the basic prin-
ciples of grammar. If we make mistakes, they are

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a.im., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a.i., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Liuiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackso-7:50 a. m, and
12:10 p.m.
MARCH
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 S 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 2
27 28 29 30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked (with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
Abbe Dimnet To
Speak Thursday
"Coming Men in French Politics" is
the topic which the Abbe Ernest Dim-
net will discuss at 4:15 o'clock on
Thursday afternoon- in the Natural
Science auditorium. The Abbe Dimnet
is a graduate of the University of Lille
and has been professor of English
there and at the College of Stanislas
in Paris.
He is well known to students of
English literature by his work on the
Bronte sisters. He has for a long time
been a frequent contributor to Eng-
lish and American magazines and
journals. In this country he estab-
lished his-reputation as a lecturer by
his Lowell lectures in 1919-1920 on
"France and the War."
LEGISLATURE COMMITTEE
VISITS UNIVERSITY CAMPUS
The ways and means committee
from the house of representatives of
the state legislature was on the cam-
pus yesterday gathering information
relative to financial legislation now
pending for the University.
The legislators were conducted
through the University buildings by
Shirley W. Smith, secretary of the Un-
iversity, 0. L. Buhr, assistant to the
President, State Senator Charles A.
Sink, and Regent Junius E. Beal. Ow-
ing to the illness of President Marion
L. Burton, he was unable to confer
with the party.
The representatives were entertain-
ed at the Union for luncheon. The
deans of the various departments were
present. Last night the representa-
tives were guests at the concert giv-
en in Hill auditorium by the Detroit
Symphony orchestra.
DeBarr's Wolverine Cafe, the OR-
IGINAL Wolverine Cafe in ANN AR-
BOR, is located at 105 S. Thayer St.,
where it gives the best home cooked
meals in thecity.DeBarr's Wolverine
Cafe has no other location.-Adv.
A SHORTER
SHORTHAND SYSTEM
IN TEN EASY LESSONS
This course covers ten easy lessons
which will enable the Student, Pro-
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or
anyone seeking a professional career,
to gothru life with 100 per cent effi-
ciency.
THIS COURSE

Is short and inexpensive, and is
given with a money back guarantee
if not satisfied.
Send This Clippiifg Today
Pyramid Press: Publishers
1416 Broadway,
New York City
Gentlemen:-Enclosed herewith
is $5.00 for which kindly send
me your shorthand course in
ten easy lessons by mail. It is
understood that at the end of
five days, I am not satisfied my
money will be gladly refunded.
Name......................
Street.....................

A Nice Cozy Place Where
You enjoy Your ledl
One half block South
of "MAJ"

._

G R A H AM
TEXTBOOKS and SUPPLIES for All
Colleges at Both Stores
B EA HA N
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

LUNCH ROOM

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Ah! Why did she make me leave
And why so cruel the fair?
When a boy I'd had scarlet fever
And it settled in my hair.

her?

- Ex.

Dear 'Noah :
What is a hand to hand contest?
Hissed Torie.
If we remember our English correctly, a hand to
hand contest is a deaf and dumb couple trying to
out-talk each other.
Our Daily Novelette
I
Evening's purple mantle had long since descended
over Ann Arbor, but still no light gleamed in the
topmost room of the league house. In the dark-
ness with strained eyes that burned unnaturally sat
a girl. Dogged determination was printed on her
face; the lines about her mouth were hard and
drawn.
II
She glanced down once more at the knife which
she held in her lap. She picked it up - the fingers
which toyed with it were nervous and shaky. She
had heard of other girls who had done this thing.
Why shouldn't she? She set the knife down once
more but continued to stare at it fascinatedly.
III
She felt its keen edge. Yes, she reflected bit-
terly, the knife was sharp enough for her purpose,
she should be able to do the job nicely with this
implement. She picked the knife up once more,
held it poised for an instant and then with a little
cry she tossed it from her to the farthest side of the
room. She burst into convulsive weeping and be-
tween strangled sobs she finally managed to utter,
"I guess, after all, I'm no better than the rest of
these' co-eds. I simply can't learn to sharpen a
pencil."
Famous Closing Lines
"The- breath of suspicion," she cried as she
smelled the life savers he had been using.
NOAH COUNT.

lb..

FACTS

Dry Cleaning is washing your garments
either in Gasoline or Benzol
Ann Arbor's only Cleaners
not using gasoline
BENZOL USED EXCLUSIVELY
ODORLESS GUARANTEED
Have it 'Master Cleaned"

I1

Phones 1890-1891

We call for and deliver

City and State...........

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