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March 08, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
RAIN AMD WARNER
TODAY

r013Ur#a

4~ii

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
IPAY AND NIGHT WIT
SERVICE

#

VOL. XXXI. No. 106. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 1921. PRICE FIVE C

WOLVERINES

DEFEAT ILLINI,

28- 2

pAllies Cross

The Rhine

OF TERMS CAUSES
NDIPLOMATIC BREAK
FRENCH, BRITISH AND BELGIAN
TROOPS MOVE TOWARD
BORDER
GERMANY APPEALS TO
LEAGUE FOR ACTION

1

Lloyd George Deplores Necessity
Decision; Scores Counter
Proposals

of

BULLETIN
London, March 7. - Germany
will appeal to the Leagu'e of Na-
tions against the action of the al-
lies In imposing penalties for n9n.
fulfillment of her reparation
agreement, it was announced to-
night.
Foreign Minister Simons in a
reply to Lloyd George said: "Ger-
many is not a member of the
league but she has signed the
pact of the league and I therefore
appeal in the name of the German
government to the assembly of
the League of Nations for action
against the, treatment we are to
receive at the hands of the al-
lies."
(By Associated Press) (
London, March 7.-- Negotiations
over the German indemnity were
broken today, and action comes to-
morrow with the march of French,
British and Belgian forces into Ger-
many. Even now Allied troops are on
the move, for a late Berlin dispatch
says that French troops are moving
to occupy Dusseldorf, having already
advanced to within six miles of that
city.
The Allied ultimatum was given ap-
parently with reluctance by the Brit-
ish prime minister.
Two long .sittings of the conference
threshed out the final break before
Marshal Foch and Field Marshal
Wilson wrote.a telegram ordering the
commanders of the front to execute
the orders given them.
Mr. Lloyd George said, speaking for
the Allies, that they deeply deplored
the necessity of the decision, while
Dr. Simons clung to the last to the
contention that the Allied demands
were impossible for Germany to ful-
fill. The Allies regarded the German
counter proposals as excuses for de-
lay and the latest plan is one where-
by the whole treaty would have to be
reconsidered, by which time Germany
might occupy a more favorable posi-
tion. Dr. Simons finally asked for
more time. This was denied.
The French army will furnish the
bulk of the forces for use against
Germany.

'22 WILL BE FIRST
TO HEAR BURSLEY
Music, food, smokes, and addresses
form the program of the junior lit
smoker to be held at 7:30 o'clock
Thursday night in the second floor
reading room of the Union. J. A. Burs-
ley, Dean of Students, has been secur-
ed to address the smoker, making
what will be his first talk before the
students since assuming his new of-
fice. Other speeches which will be
announced at a later date are also
scheduled.
Tickets at 50 cents each may be se-
cured from committee members about
the campus or at the door.
ARCHITECTS ET'
SIGNALHONORS
Eight Graduates of Michigan School
Given Awards in Erugay
Exposition
INTERNATIONAL RECOGNITION
COMES TO UNIVERSITY MEN
International recognition was given
to University of Michigan architects
when eight graduates of the Michigan
architectural college, and one former
student of the same school were given
awards at an exhibition of work by
architects and architectural schools,
held at Montevideo, Uruguay, in con-
nection with the first Pan-American
congress of architects. The awards
were as follows:
A. B. Berg, '15A, was awarded a gold
medal on his design for a cathedral.
Silver medals were awarded to W. L.
Rindge, '16A, on a railroad station
and steamship terminal designs, and
to C. W. Atwood, '1'A, on the drawing
for a public building.
"Diplomas of merit" were given for
various problems, including a hospital,
a school of fine arts, a monumental
fountain, and a supreme court room.
H. J. Hamer, '18E, G. S. Underwood,
'17A, F. A. Brinkman, '16A, R. F.
Gerganoff, '17A, and Paul Davis, '18A,
were presented with diplomas. Un-
derwood has not quite completed the
requirements for graduation.
PROF. HEADER CONVALESCING;
MAY RESUME DUTIES SOON
Prof. Clarence Meader, of the ro-
mance language department, who has
been confined to the hospital as a re-
sult of injuries sustained when he was
run down by an automobile a few
weeks ago, has been removed to his
home.
Professor Meader's condition, how-
ever, does not warrant his return to
his duties at present, but providing
that his recovery continues steadily
he will resume his work within two
weeks.

MICHIGAN IN TIE
WTPRDEORBIG 10 COURT TITLE
MILLER HIGH SCORER OF EVEN-
ING; DUNNE TOSSES IN
FOUR
VARSITY HEADED BUT
ONCE IN ENTIRE GAME

J
1
I
l
t
t
c
t
1
1
7
1
i

Michigan
Runs.

Kahn In Accord
With Harding 'IS
Foreign Policy
"I am heartily in accord with Pres-
ident Harding's policy of avoiding
military alliances with European na-
tions," said Rep. Julius Kahn Sunday
night in an interview. "It is a doc-
trine which I have preached myself
for a long time.
"I am not an internationalist," he
declared. "I am a nationalist in the
strongest sense of the word. I believe
the United States should keep clear
of Old World polities. If we are to
maintain our prestige and influence we
must stay out of the squabbles which
would damage it. But I do think the
United States should aid our fellow
republics on the North American con-
tinent as much as we can."
Mr. Kahn came to Ann Arbor direct
from Washington. While here he was
entertained by the Zeta Beta Tau fra-
ternity, of which he is the nationalj
president. He left Ann Arbor yester-
day morning for Detroit, where he
will speak tonight. From Detroit Mr.
Kahn will go to Louisville, Ky., and
thence to his home in California.
1921 UNION OPERA
CAST ANNOUNCIED.

Gets Early Lead; Illinois
Neck and Neck in Sec-
ond Half

Lets go Michig'an! Meet the
victors when they arrive at the
Michigan Central station at 5S
o'clock this afternoon.,
(By a Staff Correspondent)
Urbana, Ills., March 7.-Michigan'
climbed into a tie with Purdue for
Western Conference basketball honors
by defeating Illinois here tonight, 28
to 26. Michigan took an early lead in
the bitterly contested contest, and ex-
cept for a moment in the second half
was never headed.
At all times of the game only a few
points separated the two teams 'and
Illinois' effort to come into the lead
resulted in a hard fought game.
Miller Sinks Six
The Wolverine five played a brilliant
game with evey man fighting equally
hard to bring Michigan to the fore in
Conference basketball. Miller made'
six sensational shots, and Dunne came
through with three short ones and
one long shot. Joe Karpus and Jack
Williams, playing their last games for
Michigan, distinguished themselves.1
Joe made two pretty field goals and
counted two out of four attempts at
free throws. Time after time Williams1
took the ball off the backboard and
started it down the floor.
The Illinois fans were rooting wild-
(Continued on Page Eight)
ARTISTS S C O R E
SEASON'S H I T IN
FINAL SYMPHONY'
Cyrena Van Gorden, contralto solo-
ist, and the Detroit Symphony orches-
tra with Ossip Gabrilowitsch conduct-
ing gave a concert last night in Hill
auditorium which well deserves its
place at the climax of the concert
season.
After Miss Van Gorden had finished
Brunhilde's "Walkyr Cry" from Wag-
ner's "Die Walkure," the audience
seemed to feel the spirit of the pagan
war maidens. Again and again, nine
times, they called Miss Van Gorden
back, for a full five minutes and long-
er they paid tribute to a great work
sung by a great artist. She is an
American but last night she had turn-
ed to a majestic, powerful warrior
woman, a pagan goddess.
Great orchestral work is that in
which the members of the orchestra
become fused into an organic whole,
pulsing with life under the baton of
the leader, and giving out a message
with every measure and every note
in that measure. Such is the work of
the Detroit Symphony orchestra and
of its conductor, Ossip Gabrilowitsch.
The Brahms "Symphony No. 1 in C
minor, opus 68," was full of feeling
such as few works contain. As a
really great piece of literature gives
out some thought in every line, so the
troubled, but tremendous harmonies of
this work give out a message in every
phrase.
The interpretation of Tchaikowsky's
Overture Solonelle, "The Year 1812,"
opus 49, told a story which words
could not tell. Religious feeling, in-
tense patriotism, the chaos of a bat-
tle, and the joy of the victory were
all present. It brought the already
superior program to a tremendous
climax.

Cast

Many New Faces to Be Seen in
and Chorus of This Year's

UPPERCLASS MEETING ADOPTS PLAN SUEN
OFTUDNT GOERNMENT L 9
JOTE ONAT CMPU ELETI-

4000 NAMES BACK
SWIM CAMPAIGN
Complete success marked the drive
for signatures to the swimming peti.
tion held yesterday. Although a defi-
nite count is not yet available it is es-
timated that upwards of 4,000 students
backed the request of the tank team
to the Board in Control of Athletics.
KAHN SKETCHES* HISTORY
AIND IDEALS OF AMERICA
TEMPLE BETH EL CHOIR GIVES
RITUAL RESPONCES AT
UNION SERVICE
"When Nathan Hale said, 'I have
only one life to give for my country,'
he reached the acme of patriotism,"
declared Rep. Julius Kahn in his talk,
"The True American," at the fifth
Union services Sunday night. in Hill
auditorium. "What the United States
wants is right," he said in another
place, "and the United States will'get,
right."
Religious Outgrowth
Mr. Kahn began his speech with a
short sketch of the history of the
United States, mentioning the fact that
nearly all 'the early colonies grew
out of religious persecution. "As a
result we are now the broadest nation
in regard to religious matters in the
world," he declared. "The American
people is an idealistic people. The
Spanish war was the first war ever
fought in the interests of humanity."
Music by Choir
The music given by the Temple'
Beth El choir included several ritual
responses, "Out of the Depth" by
Marston, and "And in That Day" by
Woodman. Opinion seemed to be that
the choir was one of the best that
have been heard here this year.
The Rev. Sidney S. Robins read the
scriptures and offered the prayer.
Rabbi Leo M. Franklin, of Detroit,
read the ritual service and pronounc-
ed the benediction. A. J. Cohn, '21L,
introduced the speaker.
The next Union services will come
on Sunday evening, April 3. The
speaker has not yet been. announced,
but it is understood that a woman
will be chosen.

Play
KEENA AND STEVENS TO BE
LEADING MAN AND WOMAN
Kemp Keena, '20, will be the lead-
ing man, and E. Marlowe Stevens,
'21E, will have the woman's lead in
"Top o' th' Mornin'," the 1921 Union
opera, according to the personnel
which was announced yesterday by
E. Mortimer Shuter, director. With
the opening of the, fourth week of re-
hearsals, the final selections have been
made for the 12 cast positions, and
the 40 places in the chorus.
New Faces
Many new faces will be seen this
year, although the total number in'
cast and chorus is about the same as
last year. Over 100 people, including
the orchestra and committeemen, will
make the annual trip.
As a leading character in "George
Did It" and "A Fool's Paradise," Kee-
na has taken prominent parts in other
operas. He will play the role of Lar-
ry Donovan this year. Stevens appear-
ed in the chorus of the 1920 opera,
and will take the part of Peggy
O'Dare.
Principals Chosen
Other members of the cast are: Hil-
liard Rosenthan, '21, leading come-
dian, as Miltiades Landa ' O'Jordon
Fitzgerald, body servant to Larry Don-
ovan; Howard E. Ramsey, '21E, char-
acter comedian, as Terence Mulvaney,
keeper of the Blue Goose Inn; George
Duffield, '24L, character comedienne,
as Mrs. Patience Mulvaney, wife of
Terence; Thomas E. Dewey, '23, as
Patrick O'Dare, country gentleman;
(Continued on Page Eight)

NEW BODY WILL MEET TWIC!
MONTH WITH DEAN
OF STUDENTS,
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
CONSTITUTION DRA
President, Deans of University to
Final Authority in Case of
Disagreement
Plans and constitution for a pro
ed student advisory committee vw
ratified and unanimously adopted
the meeting of upperclassmen o°'
University at their meeting held $
day afternoon in the Union.
The committee headed by C. St
art Baxter, '21, which was appoit
at the last assembly held in Janiu
made a complete report at the mi
ing of their findings and recomni
dations for changes -in the rules.
erning student conduct. The stun
advisory body was .o iginated 7
proposed as a means of insuring
enforcement of rules and regulati
covering the actions of students
student organizations.
Committee Reports
The communication included ii
report turned over by the commi
to Legrand A.-Gaines, '21E, presid
of the Student. council, stated t
"The committee has proceeded con
belief that in order for student i
ernment to be ,effective it must
more than frame, rules and legis
it must share in the responsibility
the enforcement' of all rules perta
ing to student conduct. Sharing in
responsibility and the enforcemen
the only means of insuring success
the student advisory committee."
The report of Baxter's, co mI'
was accepted by the upperciassi
and the constitution of the student
visory committee was accepted '
minor corrections. De to lack
time and the small number of
that were present, the reports of
other committees ,named' at the
assembly were not heard. Anol
meeting will be called -soon so that
phases of the present student gov
ment problem will be considered.
Students to Vote
The advisory committee pla-
be voted on by the 'student-body'i
campus election in the near future
event of its acceptance members,
be immediately elected. The nemi
of the committee that worked a
Baxter in the framing of the p:
were: Chesser M. Campbell,
Ralph E. Gault, '22L, George . J
phy, '22L, Hilliard Rosenthan,
Richey B. Reavill, '22L, Harold
Lindsay, '21, Willis D. Blake
'21L.
Constitution Follows'
The constitution as corrected
accepted is as follows:
Article 1. The name of the c
mittee shall be the Studenit Advi
committee.
Article 2. The purpose of the
mittee shall be to voice sentimei
the student body to the Dean of
dent Affairs, "to discuss with
matters pertaining to general pol
of student conduct, to submit' re
mendations on such matters to
Dean of Student Affairs, and acti
to assist the proper University aut
ities in the enforcement of all i
pertaining to student conduct.
Article 3. The committee shal
composed of four' (4) seniors and
(2) juniors. The president of
Michigan Union, the president o
Student council, and the managin
itor of The Michigan Daily shal
ex-officio members of the comm:
Council to Nominate

Article 4. The officers of the
dent council shall constitute the :
inating body for the committee
shall nominate four (4) sophon
and four (4) juniors one week pri
the spring All-campus election
which election two (2) of those
inated from each class shall'be el
to the committee, the sophomore
(Continued on Page Eight)

blulletin

(Special to The Daily)
Bloomington, March 7.-Minne-
sota defeated Indiana here to-
night 29 to 25. The game was hard
fought and close throughout. The
respective captains, Oss for Min-
nesota, and Dean for Indiana,
were the stars.

THE MICHIGAN COMEBACK
To some the belief that no matter what the handicap our teams
can turn apparent defeat into victory, seems almost fool-hardy.
Such a conclusion would be justified it the outcome of the games
Michigan goes into were decided by paper comparisons of strength
or the laws of probability regarding how many points can be
scored in the last five minutes of play. But these are not the
things that determine Michigan's status on the athletic field. In
every game there is that factor that can counterbalance all adver-
sities, namely, Michigan spirit.
This is why, in the face of a slow start or losing score, Michigan
rooters never give up hope until the sound of the whistle. And from
the justification of this hope has come the traditional "Michigan
comeback."
In jumping from the bottom to the top of the Conference bas-
ketball standing Coach Mather's quintet has staged a "Michigan
comeback" of the widest proportions. Surpassing even our fondest
hopes, this feat is one of the highest examples of the dogged fight
and dauntless spirit which Michigan has always prided herself in.
Are we going to let such an accomplishment go unrewarded
and unnoticed? The answer will be found in the size of the turn-
out that greets "The Victors" at 5 o'clock this afternoon at the Mich-
igan Central depot. Let's go, Michigan, and make it big!

MICHIGAN'S BASKETBALL TEAM LEAVING COLUMBUS EN ROUTE
FOR CHAMPAIGN,

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