100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 05, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

:.
.r..,

klLY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

98TH CONGESS PASSESi
QUIE~T INTO HISTORYI

me I

SATURDAY, MARCH f, 1921.

Number 104.

ARMY AND NAVY BILLS FAIL
PASS IN FINAL
HOURS

TO

phomore Engineers:
The next Assembly will be held Tuesday, March 8, in Room 348 of New
gineering building, at 9 o'clock. W. C. HOAD,
Class Mentor.
[ucation:
The ninth departmental conference of graduate students and others spe-
lizing in Education will be held Monday, March-7, 4-6 (not 7-9), Tappan
11.
PROGRAM
Report of Atlantic City meetings:
Professor Harvey, Ypsilanti: Army Alpha Tests in the Normal High
;hool.
Miss Davis, Jackson: The Burgess Reading Test in Grades IIP to VI.
GUY M. WHIPPLE',
ospective Teachers Enrolled with Appointment Committee:
All prospective teachers enrolled with the Appointment Committee are
quested to call at the office, Room 102 Tappan hall, and fill out location
anks for the second semester. This includes all students who have en-
lled this year whether they desire positions for next year or merely wish
leave their records on file. Office hours for this purpose for one week
ginning Monday will be held from 10:30 to 12 a. m. and 3 to 5 p. m.
MARGARET CAMERON, Secretary.

WHAT'S GOING ON
SATURDAY
.30-Union orchestra rehearsal in the
assembly hall, Union.
:15-All men playing in the Union
orchestra both first and second se-
mesters,, meet for picture, Rent-
schler's studio.
:00-Meeting of Upper Room Bible
class, Lane hall.
:30-Meeting of Craftsmen's club In
the Masonic temple.
SUNDAY
:30--University Men's .Bible class
meets in upper room, Lane hall.
:80-Meeting of all senior and jun-
ior men in the assembly hall, Un-
ion.
:00-Friends of the University meet
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. I
Kelsey, 915 Greenwood avenuq.
:00-Japanese students meet, Lane
hall.
:30-Delegates to Student Volunteer
conference at Lansing meet, Lane
hall.
:30-Student Volunteer pre-confer-
ence rally, Lane hall.
:45-Rayls-Michigan hockey game at
Weinberg's colisuem.
:00-Get together supper, Harris
hall. Professor Reeves speaks.
:00-Wesleyan guild meets, Methodist
church. There will be no social half
hour because of the University ser-
vice.
:00-Univiersity serv ice, 1ill audi-
torium..
:30-Meeting of the Kentucky club in
room 302, Union.
U-NOTICES
'he next assembly for sophomore eng-
ineers will be held at 9 o'clock on
Tuesday, March 8, in room 348,
Engineering building.
[emorial services will be held for Joe
Baker at the meeting of the Crafts-
men's club at 7:30 o'clock this eve-
ning in the Masonic temple.
he informal Varsity soccer team will
have their picture taken for the
Michigeanensian at Spedding's, Sat-
urday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The
men must get their uniforms from
Coach Mitchell for the picture.
he University Boxing club meets at
4 o'clock every Tuesday and Thurs-
day in Waterman gymnasium.
he Ferris Institute club banquet
tickets are now on sale at the Un-
ion and at Sugden's drug store.
REASE DANCE WILL BE MORE
PROFUSELY LEGAL THAN EVER

WORK, PROGRESSES ONON N PR SC EY
Scenery for the first act of "Top o'
th' Mornin'" is almost complete, the
Michigan Union construction company
under the direction of Carl Bromel,
having spent the past three weeks on
the work.
It is an interior scene of the Blue
Goose inn, County Limerick, Ireland
sometime before the great war. "It
is by far the most elaborate first act
setting ever given in a Union opera,"
said E. Mortimer Shater, opera direct-
or, yesterday.
Noted for Lighting Effects
Mr. Bromel, who designed the set-
ting, has completed the model for the
second act setting which takes place
in the garden on the O'Dare estate in
the same locale as the first act. Both
settings are said to lend themselves
wonderfully to lighting effects for
which he is famous.
After receiving ideas from Mr. Shu-
ter, the designs are made by Mr.
Bromel. The scenery is constructed
by three carpenters under his direc-
tion. The work has been going on
for three weeks and will continue un-
til the opening night of the perform-
ance.
Retouched Follies Scenery
Musical comedy organizations when
in Detroit employ Mr. Bromel to work
on their scenery, because in him they
say they have one of the best scenery
artists in the West. He gave his en-
tire time to retouching settings for the
Ziegfeld Follies during the recent run
in Detroit.
HANDBALL MATCHES ON TODAY;
TEAMS ENTER NATIONAL MEET
Today's schedule in the handball
tournament follows: 10 o'clock, San-
chez vs. Ogden; 2 o'clock, Gehring and
Watson vs. Bruker and Sanchez; 3:30
o'clock, Potts and Liu vs. Greene
brothers.
These contests will have a direct
bearing on the teams that will rep-
resent Michigan at the national hand-
ball tournament to be held the latter
part of this month in Detroit. At pres-
ent the strongest doubles team seems
to be the Glasgow-Ogden combina-
tion.
Results which have not yet been
reported are as follows: Potts-Liu
defeated G. Dower-Searnechin, 3-0;
Hauser-Swarz overcame Rosenman-
Slock, 3-1; Ogden-Glasgow beat Hau-
ser-Swarz, 3-1. Singles: Swarz beat
J. Greene, 2-0; Glasgow defeated Pall,
2:0; C. Greene defeated Wolcott, 2-
fault; Glasgow defeated C. Greene, 2-
0; J. Bowers defeated Morse, 2-0; Og-
den bested Ross, default, and San-
chez defeated Winagrand, default.

(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 4. - The 66th
congress passed into history today
with little of the flurry usually attend-
ant to the hurly burly of an inaugur-
ation.
Final gavels fell in the house at
11.50 o'clock and in the senate about
12:30 the latter clock having been
moved backwards and the former for-
wards both to meet the exigencies of
the inaugural program. Immediate-
ly the new senate was called to order
by Vice-president Coolidge for the
session requested by President Hard-
ing.
The final sessions were virtually de-
void of legistlation. The principal
bills which failed were the army and
navy appropriation budget and the
immigration exclusion bill. The army
and immigration measures met a
"podket" veto by President Wilson
who failed to sign them and the naval
bill failed to get through the senate.
President Wilson, in conformance
with custom, waited upon congress in
its final hour in his room off the sen
ate chamber signing a few lst min-
ute measures. Among these were the
sundry civil appropriation bill and
the Langley bill appropriating $18,-
600,000 for hospitalization of former
service men.
Republican leaders plan to draft
substitutes for the army and navy bills
as soon as the extra session is con-
vened by President Harding prob-
ably early in April and rush them
through. The immigration restriction
measure also will be one of the first
measures considered at the extra ses-
sion.
CREW OF WRECKED
TRAIN TO BE TRIED
Valpariso, March 4.-William Long,
engineer, and George Block, fireman,
of the Michigan Central train struck
by a New York Central train'at Port-
er, Indiana, Monday night, today were
ordered held for trial on a charge of
involuntary manslaughter by a cor-
oner's jury which investigated the dis-
aster.
Long and Block were released on
bonds of $5,000 each. Grand jury ac-
tion will be necessary, it was said, in
view of the action taken by the coron-
er's jury. The action was taken aft-
er witnesses had testified that all
signals had been set against the Mich-
igan Central train.
In a statement made before the in-
quest, an attorney for Long and Block
said they would plead not guilty, and
maintained that the New York Cen-
tral and Michigan Central roads them-
selves were guilty in that they had
permitted use of a crossing at which
signals were obscured by a sharp
curve and where safety devices were
not properly installed.
COMPETITION WILL DECIDE
ORATORICAL REPRESENTATIVE
Competition to decide the Univer-
sity's representative in the Northern
Oratorical league contest well begin
Monday night in room 302, Mason hall.
At that time six juniors will speak,
from which number two will be se-
lected.
The following day at the same time
and place one man will be chosen
from the sophomore class in direct
competition, while Wednesday of
next week the senior member will be
decided upon.
During the latter part of March,
competition will be held which will
award to the winner a prize of $100
and the Chicago alumni medal, besides
giving him the honor to represent
Michigan in the Northern Oratorical

league contest to be held during the
first week of May at the University of
Iowa.
MEDICAL DEANS LEAVE FOR
CHICAGO EDUCATION MEETING
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, of the
Medical school, and Dr. C. W. Ed-
munds, assistant dean of the Medical
school, leave tomorrow for the con-
ference of medical education in Chi-
cago.
Dr. Vaughan will give a paper on
"Graduate Instruction in Public
Health and Preventive Medicine," and
Dr. Edmunds will give on on "Grad-
uate Instruction ink Pharmacollogyp'
The general subject to be presented at
the conference is graduate instruc-
tions in medical schools.
This conference is the annual meet-
ing of graduate instruction depart-
ment of the American Medical asso-
ciation.

City News
W. S. Gilbreath, manager of the'
Detroit Automobile club, will address
the members of the Washtenaw Auto!
club at their annual banquet and elec-
tion of officers Monday evening at the
Armory.
Mr. Gilbreath was formerly a mem-
ber of the Hoosier Automobile -club
of Indiana and was one of the or-
ganizers of the Dixie Highway asso-
ciation.
The Irwin Prieskorn post of the
American Legion will present "Oh,
Oh, Cindy," a musical revue, at the
Whitney theater March 22 and 23, ac-
cording to an announceemnt made to-
day by James J. O'Kane, commander
of the post.
Dr. J. A. Wessinger, health officer,
emphasized the necessity of vaccina-
tion against smallpox yesterday. While
it is true that the disease had made
its appearance in "Ann Arbor, Dr.
Wessinger states that no one can tell
when it will appear in virulent form.
Since the holidays there have been
seven cases of smallpox.
We serve dinners to parties. Teet's
Dining Rooms, 805 E. Huron St.-Adv.

HARDING AND COOLIDGE TAKE
OFFICE MINUS GREAT CEREMONY
(Continued from Page One)
forming to Mr. Harding's wishs, were
kept free from almost every show of
the pomp and circumstances that us-
ually surround the incoming of a
chief executive.
Not Usual Crowds
Thousands witnessed the oath and
cheered the old and new President
along Pennsylvania avenue, but the
crowd was only a fraction of the cus-
tomary inauguration crowd. On the
Bible used by George Washington at
his first induction into office and the
verse of Scripture extolling the vir-
tue of an humble faith in God Mr.
Harding plighted his best ability to
the presidency. In his inaugural ad-
dressreaffirming his reverence for the
traditions of his fathers he reiterated
his belief that the supreme task ahead
was to bring the country once more
to normalcy.
Sunday night specials. Both Amer-
ican and Chinese, for your entertain-
ment. Chinese Gardens.-Adv.
SPECIAL 90c Chicken Dinner, Sun-
day, 12 to 2 p. m., Chinese Gardens.-
Adv.
Paronize Daily Advertiers.-Adv.

HARDING OUTLINES NATIO
POLICY FOR NEXT FOUR

(Continued from Page One)
full well we cannot sell where we do
not buy and we cannot sell success-
fully where we do not-carry.
Wants Homes
"There never can be equality of re-
wards or possessions so -long as the
human plan contains varied talents
and differing degrees on industry and
thrift but ours ought to be a country
free from great blotches of distressed
poverty. We ought to find a way to
guard against the perils and penal-
ties of unemployment. We want an
America of homes, illuminated with
hope and happiness, where mothers,
freed from the necessity for long hours
of toil beyond their own doors, may
preside as befits the hearthstone of
American citizenship. We want the
cradle of American. childhood rocked
under conditions so wholesome and
so hopeful that no blight may-touch
it in its development and we want
to provide that no selfish interest, no
material necessity, no lack of oppor-
tunity shall prevent the gaining of
that education so essential to best cit-
izenship."
Teet's Dining Rooms for dinner
parties. 805 E. Huron St.-Adv.

ABS

4

Engineers
Have you seen it?
The "Rust" Lettering Scale--A great time saver. Price $1.25
Log Log Rules - -- A good supyly at
W A H S Unversty
Bookstores

Young Men's Clothes
Our ready-to-wears are chosen
from t h e finest lines in th e
country.
All hand cut and tailoredueand
they are designed for Young men.
WAGNER AND COMPANY
STATE STREET AT LIBERTY
Established 1848

I....1

Various innovations have been plan-
d for the "Crease," the All-law dance
hich will be held April 29 in the Un-
n, according to R. Levin, '21L, chair-
an of the senior class social com-
ittee. Supeonas, which will summon
e partners of the laws to appear on
e aforementioned date, will be is-
ed before spring vacation, and can
served any time thereafter.
B. Loring, '21L, editor-in-chief of
e "Crease Paper" promnises a legal
ition that will surpass the works
any of the earlier jurists. The
aperones have not been indicted as
t.

Cabinet Club Elects Officers
New officers for the ensuing term
were elected Thursday night by the
Cabinet club as follows: President,
M. M. Shoemaker, '21; vice-president,
C. H. Dearborn, '21E; secretary, E.
M. Hampton, '21E; treasurer, B. J.
Gurevich, '23.
Burton to Give Oberlin Address
President Marion L. Burton has ac-
cepted an invitation to deliver the
commencement address at Oberlin col-
lege, Oberlin, Ohio, on June 22.

I. 0. T. C. NOTICE
2 Students
required to complete the en-
ment in the infantry unit of
R. O. T. C. Enroll now in
n 241, Engineering building.

Are you going to have a party? Let I
Teet's Dining Rooms serve the dinner.
-Adv.
Increase your business by advertis-
ing in The Michigan Daily.-Adv. '

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan