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March 05, 1921 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-05

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DAILY

7t,

nty" Flay That Will Endure
Despite Disregard By Publishers

(Editorial Note.-Prof. R. E. Cow-
den,, of the rhetoric department, has
written the following review of "Bunty
Pulls the Strings," which will be en-
acted Wednesday, March 9, by mem-
bers of the Comedy club.)'
As I turn the pages of the soiled
manuscript copy of "Bunty Pulls the
Strings" and renew my acquaintance
with the quaint speech, the shrewd
Scotch characters, and the amusing
plot, I am struck by the contrast be-
tween the lowly form in which 1 find
the play accessible and the qualities
of the play itself.
Anhour spent in one of our book
stores will disclose numerous vol-
umes of modern plays each trimly
bound to the publisher's taste in
green, or lavender, or pink; and there
will be hardly a play in these fine
feathers that does not suffer by com-
parison with Graham Moffat's little
Scotch comedy.
]Mde Long Runs
"Runty Pulls the Strings" should
have been in book form a decade ago
because it is a play of quality. Since
its long run at the Haymarket thea-
ter In 1911 in London, and its unusual
success in the United States the fol-
lowing year theater-goers have never
entirely forgotten it. Every now and
then in the casual talk of play lovers
someone comments upon "Bunty," and
the talk wanders on about her brother
Rab, and her lover, Weelum Sprunt.
The speech has much to do with
the permanent character of the play.
Graham Moffat sought to present mid-
die-class characters in the Scotland of
60 years ago. *He knew the Scotch-
vernacular, and the Scotch inflection
so well that the talk of the characters
runs on naturally and spontaneously,
and is a joy to hear. The speeches
grow freely out of situation and char-
acter; rephrase them and you not
only obscure the meaning but you
destroy the charm of the play.
Characters Are Lasting
Much more than the speech, how-
ever, does the play owe its characters.
I must mention Bunty, and Weelum
and Rab, and Tammas Biggar, and
Susie Simpson, and Eelen Dunlop, and
Jeems Gibbs, names only, until the
play itself makes them alive. Few
dramatic characters will linger in
memory - longer than Bunty. She
doesn't need a Maude Adams or a Mrs.
Fiske (if madame were younger), to
make her a convincing character.
She is here in the mlanuscript, a
wholesome, clear-headed Scotch lassie,
simple, modest, almost naive at times
and yet quick-witted and shrewd to
a degree that turns many a danger-
oous situation in her favor. Weelum
Sprunt, timid before the trivial re-
sponsibilities that are his in the or-
dinary affairs of life, always slow to
act, sometimes never reaching the
point of action, dumb when circum-
stances cry for speech, makes a per-
fect foil for Bunty's practical aggres-
siveness. And yet Weelum has in him
enough honesty and solid goodness to
satisfy an audience that Bunty is not
throwing herself away when she mar-
ries him. Rab, and Tammas Biggar
Susie Simpson, and the others are all
homely Scotch characters displaying
no small degree of the narrowness
and weakness and very much the stur-
diness* and goodness of the true,'Scot.
The playwright has not shifted the re-
sponsibility of characterization to the
actors but has made definitely traced
human beings living through the pages
of the manuscript.

Strings Pulled and Pulled
I cannot leave this comment on the
play without saying a word about the
last act. "Bunty Pulls the Strings" is
a very suggestive title, and one tries
immediately to connect it with events
of the action. In the first act there
are decided evidences that Bunty has
the ability to pull strings, and in the
second act Bunty has more than one
opportunity to pull and does so withl

DELAY-HOLDS UP MARCH LAW
REVIEW UNTIL FIRST OF WEEK
Due to an unavoidable delay at the
printer's, the March number of the
Law Review"will not be out until Mon-
day or Tuesday.
Besides the usual departments, the
issue will contain an article on "The
Respective Rights of Preferred and
Common Stockholders in Surplus Pro-
fits" by George Jarvis Thompson, al
.feature concerning ancient Chinese
codes and other sources of legal ideal
by John Wie, and an article entitled
"Does the Constitution Protect Free
Speech?" by Herbert F. Goodrich.
Get the habit. Follow the "ones who

a Trubey
Home-made Candies
and Box Candies
Discount on 3ox Candies
218 S. MAIN STREET
Phone 166

I

NOWA

TAILORING

FINE CUSTOM

Skeep Anyplae 11
Eat at Rex's
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
Near State and Packard

,I

11111

i

The Quality of our
Workmanship is high-
er than the Price.

See the New Remington Portable
Typewriter-Standard Keyboard. G.
E. Washington, 8-9 Savings Bank
Building.-Adv.
After the dance you are invited to

11111

t good will; but few
the play for the first
from these two acts
number of strings to,

who are seeing
time will guess
the astonishing
be pulled in the

Albert Gansle
113 South Main Street
Second Floor

SH U B E RT
0 E T R 0 1
"Kissing Tme
D ETR 0 nieT
I R E N E
The Sensation of 4 Continents

third. Through a maze of conflicting
interest that threatens a serious con-
clusion of the play Bunty adroitly
puls string after string until the sit-
uation is clear and she can turn from
her family's struggles and finish the
Monday washing.
AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Screen
Majestic - "The Inside of the
Cup," from the story by Win-
ston Churchill. Pathe News
and ,Universal Comedy, "Hap-
py Daze."
Arcade-Hope Hampton in "The
Bait." News film and a Bray
comic.
Wuerth -Justine Johnstone in
"The Plaything of Broadway."
Orpheum-Annette Kellerman in
"What Women Love." I
THIS WEEK
Stage
Whitney- Tonight -David Bel-
asco's production, "Tiger
Rose." I

know" to the Chinese Gardens.-Adv. the Chinese Gardens.-Adv.
I liI1l 111N1111111111iil NIIIIIIi IIItIIIIlIIIIU IIIIIINll ll 111111111111111111111111111111li
To the Music Lovers and Theatre-Goers
of Ann Arbor and Vicinity
I take great pleasure in announcing that I have been able
to secure Musical Comedy's Foremost Stars, CECIL LEAN
and CLEO MAYFIELD, in their latest and greatest mu-
sical comedy success, "Look Who's Here," in which they
will appear at The Whitney Theatre Thursday,-March 10, .
for one performance only, with a great supporting company
of artists, and with positively the same production used during
its run at the 44th Street Theatre, New York City, and also cr
at the Studebaker Theatre, Chicago; the Garrick Theatre,
_ Philadelphia, the Colonial Theatre, Boston, and in all the =
larger cities in this country. Ann Arbor is one of the six
smaller cities to be played by this attraction this season.
DON MCINTYRE, Mgr.
HOW TO ORDER TICKETS BY MAIL
Send cheque or postoffice money order to Manager, The Whitney
Theatre, for amount of tickets purchased, adding 10% tax. Enclose r
self-addressed, stamped envelope to avoid error. Mail orders filled
in order of receipt.-
J. L. CHAPMAN

WHITNEY THEATRE'
TONIGHT
DEST SEATS MAIL ORDERS
$2.00 NOW
Greatest of All Belasconian Melodramas
DAVID BELASC,
jpreIEntJ
i sMAM

i
i
I

NNA
(' a
d

Mr. Belasco's Original Production and Only.
TIGER ROSE COMPANY
with its thrillingly, gripping story of

LOVE
Truely Fighting
Gorgeous

YOUTH PASSION
Red-blooded Men At Its Highe
settings, Rivaling Nature in
Charm and Beauty

1
I
i

Garrick (Detroit) - The latest
musical comedy hit, "Irene."
Shubert (Detroit) -- "Kissing
Time," a musical play with
William Morris and Edith
Taliaferro.

-. .,_,

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street
ANN ARBOR, - - MICHIGAN,

HALLROOM
BOYS
COMEDY

7A T E R
.-thj

I1

COLORED
PATHE
REVIEW

I1?]

I

I -.

LAST TIMES TODAY

LAST TIME TOO

'A

y.

TOD A Y

I

ANNETTE

Winston

KE LLERMA N

Churchill's

IN

Powerful romance of plain worth and
gilded hypocrisy. A story of love that
startled the churches and toppled over
the gods. of ''high society.

"'WHAT
WOMEN

WELL WAR RANT WEN
OUR WORK YOtIVE TIED
THAT YOU WILL 8E
GauITE
SATISMED
YES, we're quite able to
guarantee the plumbing
work we do because we
never announce that a job is
finished until it is perfectly sat-
isfactory both to us and to our,
customer. We know that you'll
be entirely satisfied with our
services. Phone 2452.
!#iill#####i#
BERENAK & MARTIN
PLUMBING HEATING
REPAIRING
Phone 2462
320O NORTH MAIN STREET

1I

C AMOUS PWaYERs-tASKY CORP. .PQESENTS
The InOide ot
ffie GUuP 99

0

LOVE"

.....

r

Ct' rsinopolifanjOv uc f M
r
. a r

JUSTINE JOHNSTONE

The Perfect Woman In
an Hilarious Comedy

A romance that grips the whole of life

and turns it inside out

CHESTER COMEDY
"You'll Be Surprised

OTHER ADDED FEATURES

PATHE NEWS

- UNIVERSAL COMEDY

- ORCHESTRA

C 0 M I N G

NEXT

SUNDAY

,JUSTINE JOH(NST0NE
'THE pi.AYTH ING OF BROAD'WAY"
cR6A NR.X FQRES _w +

I NTERNATIONAL

"Midsummer Madness"

NEWS

"THE PLAYTHING OF BROADWAY"

11

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