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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 03, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'HE MICHIG,

&A1.

.. ,

..............

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
rear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
rhe Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ted in 11his paper and the local news published therein.
Kntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, .as second
matter.
5ubkription by carrier or mail, $3.50o.
Dffices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
hones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 2414.
ommunications not to exceed 3 .0 words, if signed, the sig-
-e not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be publsfied in The Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Dail'y office.'
*ned communications will receive no consideration.a oman-
t will be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
'he Daily does not' necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ed in the communications.
,What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening preceding insertion.

EDITORIAL STAFFs
Telephone 2414
:ING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
ditor ................,..........Chesser b. Campbell
,ditors-W Htcoc
T. H. Adam H. W. Htchcock
J . I. Dakin J .7cai
enaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Editor ................J.............. A. Bernstein
tor ....... ... ......... ...B. P. Campbell
.Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
............................... Robert. Angell,
s Editor...... ......................Mary D. Lane
h ..... ............ ........ Thomas Dewey
e................................Jack W. Kelly
7 'Assistants
e Waldo . Wall ce P. Elliott - R. Meiss
Weber Leo J. Hersbdorfer Walter Donnelly
h Vickery Hughston McBain Beata Hasler t
lark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
Reindel J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
Monfort W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
t Grundy Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
Olberholtzer J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
0. Adams Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
Stone M. A. Klaver

ti
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..._-

BUSIAESS STAFF
Telephone 960
NESS MANAGER ..........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
ising .................................D. P Joyce
eds................ ..............Robts 0. Kerr
ation..................................F. M. Heath
Its .....................................-E. R. Priehs
"tion ............................ .............V. I. Hilery
Assistants
Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
nd Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
W. Millard +M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
amel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

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Persons wising to secure information concerning news for any
Isuo of The Daly should see the night editor, who has full charge
pf~all news to be printed that night.
--
THURSDAY, MARCH 3.1921.
Night Editor-L. ARMSTRONG KERN.
UDGE GRANT: ALUMNUS CUM LAUDE
Periods in the history of the University of Mich-
,an are of course most closely linked with the
eeds and character of her presidents, whose influ-
rnce has always seemed the distinguishing factor of
ach era. But it is well to remember that behind
he work of these men was the devoted service of
undreds of others, and that the contribution in
me and wisdom of the advising and administer-
ig regents of each epoch has had a most important
art.
Judge Claudius B. Grant, '59, who passed away
ionday morning at St. Petersburg, Fla., entered
he administration of the University as a member
f President James R. Angell's first Board of Re-
ents when that great figure of Michigan's past
>ok office in 1871. He was to see and take part
I the inauguration of a golden age in the Uni-
ersity's story which will always be connected with
ie work of Dr. Angell. Judge Grant brought to
ie Board his experience as a lawyer and a stu-
ent of education, coupled with a spirit of loyalty
his Alma Mater which at once bore fruit in the
aming of the law which provided funds to con-
:ruct University hall and the sponsoring through
> passage of the twentieth-mill tax bill for Uni-
ersity support. During his later life he was able
) add to these practical services the reflected
:nor which Michigan derived from his twenty
ears of justiceship in the state supreme court. In
8g5 he passed down the decision which deter-
tined for all time the status of the Board of Re-
ents as the state's only constitutionally created cor-
Yration, and settled the position of the University
relation to the legislature. His best known serv-
e, however, was his chairmanship of the commit-
e which in 1903 began work to raise alumni funds
>r Memorial hall, and brought the plan to sue-
ss with the dedication of the beautiful structure
110.
For Michigan, Judge Grant's life will always
and in memory not only as that of a great lawyer
id useful Regent, but as a type of the ideal alum-
is - the grauate who can hold his practical de-
tion to his University through all later life.
ANOTHER FALLS IN LINE
Coming as a sequel to a successful twenty-eight
ars' trial of the honor system, power of dismissal
r misconduct has been conferred on the Prince-
n Senior council by an unanimous vote of the
.culty. Under the ruling the council will deal
ith cases unmolested by faculty interference and
ill have the right to compel dismissals without
oferring evidence in any cases which "in its esti-
ation tend to lower the moral tone and good
une of Princeton". -
Princeton's progress offers a striking example of
e inherent good sense of solving the problems in
llege life by the application of the sound princi-
es of student self-government. A fair idea of the
ange that has come about since the days of faculty
pervision can be had by comparing the examina-
>ns before .the installation of the honor system,
ien according to Dean McClenahan, "cribbing
s one of Princeton's favorite indoor sports." The
edge of honesty has so reduced the number of

cases of cheating since that time that they can be
counted on two hands for the whole period.
Michigan is well on her way to a similar solution
of campus problems, backed by the declaration of
Dean Joseph A. Bursley that he wishes student self
government to have the largest scope in which it
can successfully work. The set of rules now in for-
mation by Student council committees is being
thought out on the principle of providing a per-
manent system which will become in time tradi-
tional, through the simplicity of its process and the
sureness of enforcement. Every effort of forward-
looking students and faculty members ought cer-
tainly to be devoted to the securing and definite es-
tablishment of such a plan. It is time Michigan
should be up-to-date in this important phase.
We have taken a great step in the honor system
trial. Let us give the government proposals as fair
a chance.
CHECKING UP THE BRASS CHECK
Significant as an attempt, though a belated one,
to answer the sweeping indictment of the Amer-
ican'press made in "The Brass Check," the recent
Jecture by Dr. James Melvin Lee, director of the
department of journalism of New York university,
is disappointing as being only another incomplete
re'futation of the charges made. Instead of dis-
posing of the accusations once for all, Dr. Lee's
speech only emphasizes the disturbing fact that as
yet no adequate answer has been made by the press.
To date American journalists have usually stop-
ped short after disparaging the reliability of the
author of the book. Some few have gone further
to score the omission of names, dates, and other
information by which the accusations could be
tested. Others, such as Dr. Lee, have shed light on
some parts of the question although failing to bring
forth conclusive proof vindicating modern Ameri-
can journalism.
In the meantime the charges-are gaining wider
circulation daily and menacing the public's faith in
the press. Because they are so slanderous and in-
elusive the fact that they have never been scotched
approximates an admission of their truth. At the1
present time the accusations have gained such a
hearing that regardless of their source they cannot
be disposed of as trivial insults that will be forgot-
ten if ignored.
Should any of them be true there is no doubt
that their seriousness might be greatly mitigated by
explanations of the attending circumstances. One
can have no doubt from reading the book that the
author has missed few opportunities to use his ma-
terial to create the most startling effect, and has
not gone out of his way to supply information op-
posed to his case. In this connection explanation of
why an act was done often gives an entirely new
complexion as to whether or not it was wrong. For
instance some of the alleged suppressions of news
cited are cases of personal telegrams which the As-
sociated Press does not make a practice of distribut-
ing as news.
Scoffing and ignoring the charges has proved a
failure. The time has come for the American press
to produce a complete and conclusive refutation of
the slander, in the form of an exhaustive review of
"The Brass Check" branding its inaccuracies and
setting out the circumstances in each case. The
public is entitled to an explanation and the cloud
will not be removed from American journalism un-
til each falsehood has been nailed, or if admitted
as truth proved to be indicative of a past condition
which has really been altered.
ry The Telescope
You're probably right, Clarice, when you say
that a man who has money can be a blockhead and
still be good fraternity timber.
Dear Noah: -
Do you think if the '''blue sky" reformers have
their way they will even forbid funerals to be held
on Sunday? L. J. K.

Certainly, because those attending might violate
the prohibition laws by passing around the bier.
Some Cow
From a Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, newspaper:
For Sale-A cow that gives five quarts of milk a
day, a set of golf sticks, a set of law books and very
fine fur overcoat. - The American Legion Weekly.

D E ThOIT UNITED' *NES
in Effect Nov. 2, 1920
BetweenI
Detroat, Ann Arbor and Jatkson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Linited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. mn., and hourly to 9:10 p. mn.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a.. m. and' e ery two,
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a. .
and every two hours to 9:00 p. n.,
also 11:00 p. i. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jacksou-7:6 0a. w., and
12:10 p.m.

J. L. CHAPMAN

8

iVIA0RC1I
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9
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6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25,26
27 28 9 30 41
Meu: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, reinished and re-
Sblocked with all ne0w trlrainngs
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hlit Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1702.
-PAI D i N G
Athletie
Equipment
41 ji_ For Every
Jndoor
And
Outdoor
Sport
- ataloge on request
A. C SPAL:AN & BROS.
211 S. State St., Clicago, Ill.

WalfntSomething a little I
_ aDiferen~ht,.
and a little better than
you' ve been eating?
w F
-- Then come to 'Feet's Dining Roois
The food is excellent, the prices
reasonable, w
K
I ~ Tet's *Dining Ro m I
805 E. Huron
I5t11t 1 #ia li' MaNO1r1der111 1 11s11 l l 1 f

A

H

A

M

TEXTB0KnS 11 SUPPLIES for All
Colleges at Both Stores
B TEA IHA M
BOTH ENDHS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of ltellability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street ti
ANN ARBOR, - MIClllGAIN

Sleep Anyplace But
.fat at Rex 's
THE CLUB LUNCH
712 ARBOR STREET
N ear State and Packard

- _______ -_________________

-I

Phone Orders
Promptly Filled

Mail Orders
Promptly Filled
~1ST. 1857

National Sik Week
FEBRUARY 28 - MARCH 5
NEW SILK FROCKS
$25 - $29.75 - $35
Three lots of dresses have been marked at three very interesting prices
during Silk Week. And they are dresses you can't help liking. Exemplify-
ing as they do the very latest style tendencies, the new silhouette with wide
skirt tendencies, the new silhouette with wide skirt and flaring lines, combined
with rather tight fitting waist, and showing the newest ideas in trimming and
design, these little frocks are visions of loveliness, The materials are satin,
crisp taffeta, soft clinging crepe de chine and Canton crepe. Colors simply
run riot- starting with the ever dependable navy blue, featuring the new craze
for gray, Venetian red and showing, of course, steady stunning black. And
the styles are as varied as the colors. Ruffled skirts, basque waists, flaring
overskirts, sometimes corded with velvet ribbon to emphasize the fullness,
quaint puffed sleeves of georgette, wide collars, making a surplice effect in
front and sashes of many toned ribbon make these little frocks the last word
in style. And nothing need be said about the prices-they speak for them-
selves. (SECOND FLOOR)
Lingerie at Wholesale Prices
We have been extremely fortunate in securing a sample line of lingerie,
which we are able to sell at wholesale prices. In fact, we are offering it to
you strictly at cost. And you can't have too much dainty, new lingerie. Ev-
erything you could possibly want is included i nthis lot and at prices so low
that they will surprise you,
Envelope chemise in muslin, lace trimmed, embroidered and plain with
hemstitching, in both pink and white, 50c to $3.50,
Silk.and cotton envelope chemises $1 to $1.50,
Extra size gowns made of fine material and beautifully trimmed with
lace, $1 to $5.
Regular size gowns in pink and white batiste or crepe, some trimmed
elaborately with lace, others with bits of hand embroidery in color, $1 to $5.
Another pajama suit is made of pink soisette with its silky finish and is
trimmed with bands of pale blue. This jaunty little suit is $5.50. Another
pajama set of pink crepe trimmed with bands of satin is $2.75.
l3loomers in crepes and silks are $1 and $2.
Camisoles of crepe de chine, satin' or georgette crepe embroidered and
lace trimmed are $1.75 to $3.
Silk and cotton night gowns are $1.75 to $4.
(SECOND FLOOR)

Pleasant neighbors are
Usually mighty nice things
To have -- but what about
The animals at the zoo that
Have their cages right
Next to the laughing hyenas?

A Freshman to a College Widow
She thought me too young ad I never forgave her
For being s' cruel to my face,
For without any reason she called me a shaver'
When I hadn't a hair on my face.
Ouridea of the poorest show on earth is a skinny
girl trying to wear a-real short skirt.
And about this time
The note most mean
Is "Report at once" --
Signed by the dean.
Pamous Closing Lines
"Taking it hard," he cried as he saw him drink-
ing the cider without diluting it.
NOAH COUNT.

!L

'I

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