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March 03, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-03

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND MUCH COLD-
J ER TODAY

r.....Lw bpA

4 . l

ASSOCIAT
PRESS

PAY ANTD NIHT Il
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 102. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 1921. PRICE FIVE C

GERMANY TO HEAR
FATE OF COUNTER
PROOASTODAY
OFFER OF THIRTY BILLION GOLD
MARKS MEETS LITTLE EN-
COURAGEMENT
ALLIED FORCES READY
TO ENFORCF DEMANDS
Expected Refusal May Be Foowed
by Invasion of Rhine and
Port Blockade
(By Associated Press)
London, March 2.-The Germans at
noon tomorrow will hear the unani-
mous decision of the Allied powers
on the counter proposals which Dr.
Simons, the German foreign secretary,
presented yesterday at the repara-
tions conference, and the consequenc-
es which will follow their failure to
comply with the Allied terms.
There is little doubt as to the na-
ture of the reply, for in a statement
issued after a meeting of the supreme
council this evening, the counter pro-
-posals are described as- meriting
"neither examination nor discussion."
Details of what steps will be taken
to enforce the demands of the Allies
were withheld tonight, it being con-
sidered only an act o courtesy to let,
the Germans hear them before they
are published.
Mr. Lloyd George consented today
to the employment of armed forces
against Germany in the event of her
noncompliance to the extent of the
occupation of Mannheis by British,
French, and Belgium troops and also
of the Ruhr ports on the Rhine.
There may possibly also be a
blockade of German ports, although
some of the powers are opposed to
this.
The reply is described in some cir-y
cles as being in the nature of an ul-
timatum. Mysteriousness of the steps
which are being taken, both in re-
fusing to discuss the German counter
proposals and in the action to follow
may be judged by the long and earn-
est consideration the Allies gave to it.
LEGION DRIVE UNDER' WAY
00ders Ala at 5 aN wembe o
U,ver Pty Post
Pointing out that the American Le-
gion is a strong advocate of law, or-
der, and good government, and that
there are many personal advantages,
to be derived by ex-service men who
belong to it, leaders of the Univer-
sity post of the Legion yesterday be-i
gan their campaign for 500 new
members on the campus.
One of the ways in which th* Le-
gion stands ready to serve its mem-
bership, it was pointed out, is in
helping them to secure a prompt and
fair adjustment of any claims they
may have against the government as
a result of their war service. The
Michigan department secured training
under the federal board of vocational
education for $00 men during the past
month, according to information from
the headquarters of the Michigan de-
partment.
Assistance is available for men
(Continued on Page Six)

JUNIOR LIT DUES
- I
Junior literary class dues will
be payable from 8 to 4 o'clock to-
day at the booth in the main cor-
ridor of University hall. It is
necessary that these be paid if
the class is to hold any further
social events. Fees are $1 per
year.

Give Passports
Po 151 Students
Of the 180 students in the literary
college summoned to appear before
the dean to give reasons why they
should remain in the University, 151
were sent home on account of poor
grades received last semester.
Two-thirds of the entire number dis-
missed were from the freshman class,
but only four of the 151 students were
women. Three women were among
the 29 students who were able to con-
vince the authorities that they should
remain in college.
" "One noticeable thing," said Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall in commenting
upon the situation, "was that there
was an extremely high percentage of
agreement between the grades receiv-
ed last semester and the results of the
mental tests taken last UJanuary."
As compared to former years, . the
number of students on the home list
this February is at least 60 per cent
higher than any previous mid-year
dismissals in the history of the col-
lege. The June lists are always larg-
er, but few have exceeded the cur-
rent one.
TANK MEN MEET TO ID
RECOGNITION CAMPAIGN
"Send the team to the Conference
meet!" will be the slogan adopted at
the swimming meeting to be held at
'1:30 o'clock tonight at the Union.
All members of the Varsity and
freshman tank squads are requested
to be present, and all men who have
tried out or wish to take any -part in
the campaign for recognition which
Is to be held within the next week
are urged to be on hand
As planned, the campaign will be in
petition form, and the endeavor will
be made to obtain as many signatures
as possible within the short space of
time permitted before entries must
be made in the Conference title bat-
tle. The remarkable record made by
the informal team in its second year
of life has given rise to the belief
that a splendid showing may be made
against the experienced teams of the
Big Ten, and to bear out this belief
it is hoped that the Board in Con-
trol of Athletics will see fit to offi-
cially sanction the sport so that the
men may make the trip to Evanston on
March 17, the day set for the prelim-
inary events.
Coach Drulard and Captain Gil-
more of the Varsity squad will be in
charge of the meeting, while Coach
Goldsmith and Captain Nixon of the
yearling aggregation are expected to
bring their men in full strength.
Plans will be discussed and definite-
ly outlined, talking points will be
listed, and all necessary matters will
be definitely settled.-
It is admitted that the lack of a
pool is the only thing hindering the
recognition of the sport. k
SINGER PRESENTS
BRAHMS PROGRAM
Clara Clemens, mezzo contralto,
sang last night in Pattengill auditor-
ium before a representative audience.
Her program was an all Brahms one,
showing the variety of this compos-
er's work for the voice.
Madame Clemens sings expressively-
and puts feeling into her voice. In
spite of a slight impediment, 4er
enunciation is carefully done, thus

showing that perseverance in study
can overcome certain handicaps.
Those compositions best bringing-out
the purity of her tone and showing
her ability to the best advantage
were "Sunday," "Serenade," "The
Little Sandman," "Ever Lighter Grows
My Slumber," and "The Hasty Oath."
The playing of Margaret Mannebach
was adequate in the background
which it gave to Madame Clemens'l
work..

COMMITTEES FORH

Group Picture of Men Chosen to
Taken at Rentschler's Studio
Today

BeI

MCHIGANENSIAN MUST HAVE
PHOTOGRAPH IMMEDIATELY
Committees for the 1921 Union
opera, "Top o' th' Mornin'," were an-
nounced yesterday by Edwin A Krue-
ger, '21E, general chairman, all names
having been approved by the eligibil-
ity committee.
The group picture of all committee-
men will be taken at 12:15 o'colck to-
day at Rentschler's studio. It was ne-
cessary to set an early date for the
picture because the 'Ensian must have
the photograph at once. Earlier no-
tice could not be given because of
eligibility matters.
Krueger General Chairman
The committees as announced are:
General chairman, Edwin A. Krueger,
'21E; Robert M. Kerr, '21E; Albert A.
Schirmer, '22E; and Stuart B. Smith,
'22E, assistants.
Stage-Francis L. McPhail, '21, stage
manager; Stuart Standish, '23, Arn-
old A. Piatt, '23; Otto E. Kieling, '23;
assistants.
Property -- Peirce McLouth, '21E,
chairman; John M. Winters, Jr., '23L;
Joyce M. Stedman, '22; Edwin T. Ives,
Jr., '22; Robert T. Adams, Jr., assist-
ants.
Electrician-Durban A. Longeneck-
er, '21E; William K. Rindge, '22E, as-
sitant. Costumes-William W. Peat-
tie, '21E, chairman; Donald W. Hunt-
er, '21E; H. Wibirt Spence, '22; Paul
G. Goebel, '23E, assistants.
Covell to Handle Program
Program-Mark B. Covell, Jr., '21E,
chairman; Sidney Sarasohn, '22; Ver-
non F. Hillery, '23; Richard G. Bur-
chell, '23, assistants. Make-up-Ker-
shaw Harms, '21E, chairman; West H.
Gallogly, '22; John R. Sutton, Jr., '23;
Lewis W. Stoneman, '23; Guy G. Wedt-
hoff, '23.
Publicity-Chesser M. Campbell,
'21, chairman; Brewster P. Campbell,
'22; Marion B. Stahl, '23; Wendell F.
Hanselman, '23, assistants.
ExtIra! Campu
Creek Overflows
While it may seem entirely appro-
priate and permissable for poets and
romanticists possessed of literary li-
cense to have their heroes and hero-
ines "walking on air," it would indeed
'require more than poetic license to
permit the phrase "walking on wa-
ter." And yet, whether approval is
granted this eccentric paraphrasing
of a figure of speech or not, the fact
remains that it is true-for here at
the University students are walking
on water.
How come? Due to recent heavy
snowstorms, and equally heavy rains
which have washed the snow away and
deposited themselves in the place of
the flakes, the sidewalks of the cam-
pus, which are below ground level,
have been covered with little pools
and miniature lakes of no mean
depth. Much-despised galoshes have
of necessity come into their own, and
the childhood delight of pool-wading
has again taken hold of students, those
with the galoshes braving the break-
ers like bold mariners, while unfor-
tunate males rode the foam with the
cuffs of their trousers rolled up over
their shoe-tops. ,
Perhaps it would not seem inexpe
dient at this time to urge that this
situation be remedied, and the side-
walks be raised to normal level, a
plan which has been in formation for
some time, but which if carried out
now would avoid the recurrence of
such conditions as exist on our cam-

pus walks at present.

ONE MANICONTROL
OF FLEET FAVORED
Congressional Report Favors Single
Executive National Merchant
Marine Service
COMMENDS RECORD OF SHIP
BUILDING BOARD DURING WAR
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 2.-Administra-
tion of the government merchant fleet
by one executive, instead of by a sev-
en member board, as the law now
provides, is recommended by the
Walsh committee which reported to-
day to the house on its 18 months in-
vestigation of the shipping board'
during and since the war. The report
reviewed in detail the shipbuilding ac-
tivities with the conclusion that "con-t
sidering the program as a whole the
accomplishment, in the number of
ships constructed, the tonnage secur-
ed, and the time within which. ships
were completed, it constitutes the
most remarkable achievement in ship-
building that the world has ever
seen."
The committee declared it had
found no evidence to prove that dis-
honor or fraudulent motives actuated
any member of the shipping board or
any of the trustees of the emergency
fleet corporation.
"There has been waste and ineffi-
ciency and lack of co-ordination in
the tremendous operation of this gov-
ernment's agencies," the report con-j
tinued, giving as the reason or- jus-
tification for the stress under the
war emergency, "in which, time was
the most vital factor." "It is appar-
ent, however, from the testimony tak-
en by this committee that in the de-
sire to speed up and accomplishre-
sults without counting costs, mis-
takes of judgment, lack of supervision
to give careful consideration resulted
not in a saving of time, but in delays."
The report mentioned charges made
at hearings that aneffort had been
made to collect $250,000 from the
government for the personal expens-
es of Charles M. Schwab while di-i
rector of the fleet corporation opera-
tion, and that R. W. Boling, brother-
in-law of President Wilson, had been
irregular in his conduct as treasurer
of the shipping board. Both had pre-
viously been exonerated by the com-
mittee, which, however, took occsion.'
in the report to reiterate that the
charge, involving Mr. Schwab, "has
not bee4 proven and is not true."
INAUGURATION DRAS
CR0 WOSTO WSHINGTON'
Washington Mar. 2.-The influx of
visitors to Washington to attend the
inauguration Friday has started. De-
spite the abandonment of plans for
an elaborate ceremony hundreds of
people arrived today and tomorrow
thenumber is expected to run into the
thousands with other thousands to ar-
rive Friday morning.
The special forecast of cold and
probably fair weather for inaugura-
tion day which went today from the
weather bureau may result in mate-
rially increasing the out of town
crowds.
President-elect Harding and Mrs:
Harding and a number of friends will
arrive tomorrow from Marion. -He
will go direct to the New Willard
hotel where he will make his head-

quarters until he starts for the capitol-
Friday morning. Vice-president Cool-
idge and several members of the new
cabinet already are on the ground.
The cabinet members designated here
include Charles Hughes to be secre-
tary of state and Will Harry Hays to
be postmaster general; Edward Den-
by to be secretary of the navy; former
senator John William Weeks, to be
secretary of war and Senator Fall, to
be secretary of the interior.

CONCERT SERIES
TO END MARCH 7
Ossip Gabrilowitsch and the Detroit
Symphony orchestra will give the last
concert in the Choral Union series on
Monday evening, March 7, in Hill au-
ditorium. This will be the third ap-
pearance of the Detroit orchestra in
Ann Arbor this season, a fact which
in itself shows the pgpularity of the
organization with the concert going
public of this city.
The soloist for the evening will be
Cyrena Van Gorden, the distinguished]
operatic contralto. Miss Van Gordon
has made an enviable record with the
Chicago Opera association and is
ranked among th greatest of the
young contraltos. She will contribute
a number of miscellaneous arias in
which she has been particularly suc-f
cessful.
Miss Van Gorden will also appear as
one of the soloists at the May festival
in which she will take the role of Am-
neris in Aida to be given at the Sat-
urday night concert.'
FIGHT AGINSTBDSAS
IN CHINA TEXT OF TLK
WILL TELL STORY OF DOCTOR ;
SARGENT'S SANITATION
CAMPAIGN
Mrs. Katherine Willard Eddy, for-
eign secretary of the national Y. W.,
C. A., will tell the story of the work
of Dr. Clara Sargent, '15M, in teach-'
ing health and sanitation to the Chin-
ese people, to the members of teams
connected with the Dr. Sargent cam-,
paign fund, at 7:30 o'clock tonight, in
Martha Cook building. This meeting
of workers, who expect to raise $1,700
before March 12, will be conducted by
Gertrude Boggs, '22, chairman of the
drive.
Helen Wong to Speak
Helen Wong, '24M, is to give the
Chinese girls' point of view in con-.
nection with Dr. Sargent's work and
the necessity of a successful campaign.1
Prof. John L. Brumm will also ad-
dress this meeting.
Endorsement of the work of Dr.
Sargent has been given by Dean Victor
C. Vaughan, of the Medical school,
who knew Dr. Sargent during her
college career and is familiar with
the service she is rendering.
"Dr. Clara Sargent has, done and is
doing splendid educational and health
work in China," he states. "She has
energy, skill and spirit and she ex-
erts all of these to the utmost. I
may speak for her and her work with
the heartiest support from the facul-
ties and students of the University
She is one of those who is carrying'
the name of the University of Mich-
igan into the great heart of the Chinese
people."
Dean Jordan Endorses Work
Dean Myra B. Jordan, too, has made
a statement endorsing her work as
follows: "I consider that the work
done by Dr. Clara Sargent in China is
very constructive and of great value.
I am proud that Michigan women are
supporting a Michigan woman in this
field."
ADVANCED MUSIC STUDENTS
GIVE RECITAL AT 4:15 TODAY
Advanced students of the voice,

piano, and violin departments of the
University School of Music will give
the next student recital at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in the School
of Music hall. The public is invitedl
to attend.
Those included in the recital are:
Clarence Post, Doris Schmidt, Doris
Howe, Ruth Chadwick, Vera McCal-
lum, Minnie Huber, Josephine Con-
nable, Wilma Seedorf, Esther Hol-
lands, and Normand Lockwood.

CHAMP CAKDE
WDNSA AFTER
DEATH OF DEMOCRAT LEADER
CLOSES LONG LIFE OF
SERVICE
BOTH HOUSESUNITE IN
HONOR OF EX-SPEAKER
President-Elect Harding' Telegraphs
"Deep Regret" at Death of
Old Friend
Washington, March 2. -- Champ
Clark, former speaker of the house
and Democratic political leader, died
here today at the age of 71, after a
brief illness of 10 days. Pleurisy and
a complication of diseases were giv-
en as the causes of Mr. Clark's death.
Coming just two days before his
retirement from the house of repre-
sentatives after a service of 26 years,
during the latter part of which lie
was one of the prominept figures in
national politics and a leader of the
Democratic party, the death of flepre-
sentative Clark closes a life of public
service excelled by few.
His speakership in the house during
the term of the sixty-second congress
and his close approach to the nomi-
nation for president on the Demo-
cratic ticket in 1912, only being beat-
en by Presient Wilson after prglong-
ed balloting, were the high lights in
Mr. Clark's career.
Washington, March 2. - Both hous-
es of congress on Saturday will pay
respect to Champ Clark, the dead
Democratic leader, in a manner which
has been duplicated but a few times
in- the history of the nation's law
making body. Tentative arrange-
ments for the funeral as announced
tonight provide for funeral services
at 10:30 o'clock in the house cham-
ber. Before the services the body
will lie in state in thle hall in whic,
Mr. Clark fought for 20 years for thE
right as he saw it.
Immediately after the funeral serv-
ices a special funeral train bearing
the body, the members of the Clars
family, the- sergeant-of-arms of the
senate, and the house, and the specia
house and senate committee named tc
attend the final services, will start or
its way to Missouri, the home state
of the former speaker.
Marion, Ohio, March 2. - Deep re-
gret at the death of Champ Clark was
expressed by President-elect Harding
on the eve of his departure for Wash-
ington. The two men have beer
friends for many years, having beer
associated together both in affairs al
Washington and in their rounds o:
Chautauqua circuits.
Their last meeting was in New Or.
leans Nov. 18, when both were guest
at a Chamber of Commerce luncheom
just preceding Mr. Harding's depart
ure for Panama. They talked 'o
election results, the President-elec
speaking regretfully of. Mr. Clark'
defeat for re-election and assuring
him if he desired to remain in publc
service a place would be found fo:
him under the new Republican admin
istration.
SENIOR, JUNIOR MEN TO
MEET SUNDAY AT UNION

All senior and junior men are
requested to meet at 3:30 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the As-
sembly hall of the Union to hear
and discuss the reports of the
various committees -on student
government.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr.,
President.

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