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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 02, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

E
.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
sity year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
republication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
cless matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business. 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
nature not necessarily to appear in printbut as an evidence of
faith, and notices of events will be _published in The Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Unsigned, communications will receive no consideration. No man-
uscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
pressed in the communications.
"What's Going On" ntices will not be received after 8 o'clock
on the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
MANAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
News Editor.........................Chesser M. Campbell
Night ]editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
3. I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sheroed T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Sunday Editor..... ..........................3J. A. Bernstein
City Editor....... ..... . ....-. - . -B. P. Campbell
F ditor:als........Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J Whinery
Sorts........ .............................. Robert Angell
omen'sEditor ..............................Mary D. Lane
Tlegraph......................... Thomas Dewey
Telescope .................... ..............Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
Josephine Wald Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss _
Paul G. Weber Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
Elizabeth Vickery Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
G. E. Clark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
George Reindel 3 A. Bacon, Gerald P. Overton
Dorothy Monfort W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
Harry B. Grundy Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
FrancesOberholtzer J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waler
Robert . Adams Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
George L. Stone M. A. Klavex.

but on his work" - that sort of professor is the
best guarantee we have for a higher student atti-
tude on scholarship andr an end to the complaints
on that eternal topic, marks.
MAKING EXERCISE POPULAR
Now that the new Michigan department of physi-
cal education is an assured addition to the Univer-
sity, not only the question of who the new director
will be buf also certain problems relative to the
workings of the new system and its ultimate value
present themselves, and not the least among these
is the possibility that the new arrangement may be
the means of popularizing exercise.
Most of us incollege are not ardent physical cul-
turists, and the comparatively small number who
are naturally equipped become the nucleus of the
various athletic teams about the campus. Most of
the rest of us apparently take little or no interest
in keeping ourselves fit and in fighting trim. An
all-around physical development is a great life as-
set to any man. Those who were in the army or
navy during the war learned its value if the stay-
at-homes did not; they learned what physical fit-
ness means to a man and how it increases his abil-
ity. Some, of course, have not kept up their exer-
cise since their discharge, but their service training
at least taught them its value.
Admitting, then, that physical perfection is an as-
set and worth all it costs, let us ask ourselves how
many college students really take advantage of the
opportunities offered them for physical develop-
ment. The percentage is relatively small. Go over
to the gym any afternoon; there may be a con-
siderable crowd on the floor, but keeping in mind
the seven thousand men on the campus, to say that
a building from three to five times the size of the
present gymnasium would hardly house all who
should be out would not be far from the truth.
Of course gym work is not all that is meant by
exercise; walking, riding, tennis playing, and the
like offer large possibilities for physical develop-
ment, and it is to be hoped that, among other things,
the encouragement toward exercise and health will
be one accomplishment of the newly forme'd physi-
cal education department. Elective gym classes
and the like may help do it, and certainly one point
which the new director should emphasize should be
the installation of more tennis courts. The right
sort of man could make exercise seem a pleasure
and not a task. If the new department goes at the
thing in the right way, linking the general exercise
with the Varsity team system,, workouts can be
made popular. An awakened interest in physical
culture of this sort will certainly be an asset to the
University through providing a larger and better
field of tryouts, and an aid to the health of all who
go in for it.
Th ~e Telescope

-m

MATINEE MUSICALE CONCERT COURSE
Fourth Concert
Mine. Clara Clemens (Mrs. Ossip Gabrilow itch)
Mezzo Contralto
(BRAHMS SONG RECITAL)
Pattengill Auditorium, Wednesday Mar c h '2, 8 P. M.
Single Admission $1- Tickets on sale at Graham's, Wahr's
The Concert Committee.is indebted to Mr. Graham for the use of this space.

ii

I - ..

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05' a. M.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.'
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex-1
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals toDetroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson--7: 60 a. in., and
12:10 p.m.

.rrir

99

TAXI

999

4

A Dodge Car
and D o d g e
( enough said
TAXI. 999

9

d

I'd

S

6
13
20
27

MARCH
M T W T
1' 2 3
7 8 9 10
14 15 '16 17
21 22 23 24
28 29 30 31

F
4
11
18
25

I

S
5
12
19
26

For

STUD 17 LAMPS

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
JSINESS MANAGER.........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
Ivertising ....................................D. P. Joyce
ssrfieds.................................R.obt. O. Kerr
blication.................................. F.M.Heath
counts..................................... R. Priehs
culation..................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
W. Lambrecbt P. R Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. Cro'ss R. C. Stearnes
inund*Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
ster W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617 j
Packard St. Phone 1792.

and all kinds of

EIWE CTRIC SUPPLIES

i

go to

'... saw..,.... ..

Persons wishing to secure information ooncerning news for any
issue of Th Daily should see the night editor, who has, full charge
of all news to be printed that night. __
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1921.
Night Editor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.
MARKS
Every mark has its corresponding remark, to
paraphrase psych. The holocaust which hit the
Lits this Monday past, and the Engineers a couple
of weeks ago, has set going a multitude of tongues
not by any means limited to the nine-hundred-fifty-
two probationers. "Tightening up" on the grades
could hardly be expected to slip easily over the
campus palate; to a good proportionof Michigan's
students it was about the bitterest pill of the year.
f After all, what do marks represent? To the re-
doubtable thirty who garnered "all A's" they stand
for some pretty pleasing public.ity - nobody has
any objection to knowing that people are saying,
wherever they read the list, "He certainly is
bright." If the members of the thirty have gained
out of their courses something which they recognize
as really valuable, their A's will mean much more
than that. If - as has sometimes been the case -
natural good fortune in above-the-ears qualifica-
tions has enabled them to slide into A's more easily
than the average man garners a C, the record can
mean little to them. Effort is a precedent condi-
tion to any real gratification from success, and few
men can feel much pride in honors unearned.
At the other extreme, there are the sad recip-
ients of uncompromising E's and unpromising X's.
A good many students in any university come un'
equipped in mind or in previous training for col
lege work, and the cold, hard blow sealed in the
little white envelopes is penhaps the most merciful
way to save money for them and time for the Uni-
versity. On the other hand, many a student has
dated his scholastic success from some forgotten E
or other. Notice that a whole semester of attend-
ing classes has been in vain is a prime, little awak-
ener. It gets the study habit going.
The "in-betweens", the great groaning mass who
got C's when Lord knows they coached Pete up
on the whole course the night before and he pulled
an A, we have always with us. There is no doubt
that a little higher regard for real scholarship is a
great need of this as of any other university, and
the general army of mediocrity in which most of
us find ourselves is doubtless just the place for us,
considering the state of our attitude. But there is
a large class of hard and honest workers, who get
a good deal out of their studies which never ap-
pears in their bluebooks, but which will put in a
most noticeable appearance in their later life work.
The list of our best alumni is by no means coinci-
dent with that of our best scholars; and anyone who
so far overstresses the scholastic side of college life
as to forget the differences in human capacities is
taking a pedantic viewpoint indeed.
Perhaps the most frequent cry of the great aver-
age multitude is "favoritism", and nobody who has
gone through two to four years of college life will
deny its justification in all too large a class of in-
stances. The professor who comes out, as one did
recently, and says in absolute sincerity "I don't
care how good looking you are; it makes no differ-
ence tc me if you can play athletics or play tiddle-
dewinks; your 'line' is nothing in my life; but I am
honestly going to try to give every student in this
class a fair and equal chance to make good, and
mark him not on his personality or opinion of me

AT THE THEATERS
TODAY
Screen
Majestic - "The Inside of the
Cup," from the story by Win-
'ston Churchill. Pathe News
and Universal Comedy, "Hap-
py Daze."
Arcade- Billie Burke ,in "The
Education of Elizabeth." Com-
edy and a Bray Picto.
Wuerth - William Collier in
"The Servant Question." Hall
Room Boys Comedy and Uni-
versal News.

WASHTENAW ELECTRIC SHOP

PHONE 273

200 WASHINGTON ST.

New Victor Records,I

Now on Sale

I

When Chloris Sleeps

G alli-Curci

The undertaker's no fighter,
Yet deny the fact, if you can,
That he's the kind of a boxer
Who always lays out his man.

Orpheum-Tom Moore in
ficer 666."
THIS WEEK

"Of-

Symphony in E Flat Major
Hoieydew-Med. Waltz
Honeydew-Med. One-Step
Broadway Rose-Med. Fox Trot
Sweet Mamma " '
Biddy-Fox Trot
Somebody-Med. One-Step

Jos. C. Smith's Orchestra
Original Dixieland Jazz
Band
Benson Orchestra of
Chicago

LaScala Orchestra

Enough to
Stude-I was reading that in Africa among some
of the wild tribes they segregate the men and
women.
Co-ed-Segregate them? Gee, how do the girls
have dates?
Stude-They don't have 'em - that's what makes
them wild.
Dear Noah:
I believe that I have water on the knee. What
shall I do? Worried.
The time-worn advice of wearing pumps in a
case of this kind is all we can think of.
PEOPLE TAKE LIFE TOO SERIOUSLY -
from a noted humorist's recent speech.
This gentleman probably never had the pleasure
of meeting some of these Detroit gunmen.

Stage
Garrick (Detroit) - The latest
musical comedy hit, "Irene."
Shubert (Detroit) - "Kissing
Time," a musical play with
William Morris and Edith
Taliaferro.

1

Come in and ask for a complete list
of the March Records

Enrollments are still being taken
for the second semester classes in
Shorthand, Typewriting, bookkeeping,
or Penmanship which are just being
organized at the School of Shorthand
711 N. Univ.-Adv.

Schaeberle & Son,Music House
.110 S. Main St.

I;1111

It's getting nowadays
That every prof who knows
Anything about a subject
Writes a textbook on it.
But even this fact
Fails to explain where all
These extra textbooks we
Use are coming from.
We thank you.

A Short Story
In the calm of the summer evening they lingered
on the garbage heap. "William," said the first, "I
wish I could help you to some of this full dress
suit." The-other's eyes shone with appreciation of
his friend's thoughtfulness. JIhen he regretfully
shook his head and continued contentedly to eat a
battered tin can. "No, thanks," he returned, "you
know I'm off those starched foods for life."
And as the summer haze deepened around them
the two Billy goats munched on.
How many, fooled by slight success,
To false conclusions jump,
For oft a budding genius
Grows up a blooming chump.
Anon.
Famous Closing Lines
"I never do things by halves," said the diner as
he slipped the waiter a quarter.
NOAH COUNT.

Spring Top - Coats
We have just received a limited number
of very fine top-coats designed for
Young Men.
Tweeds and Herringbones of light greys
and browns on exhibit this week.

WAGNER & COMPANY

State Street at Liberty
Established 1848

r

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