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March 02, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-02

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EATHER

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CLOUDY; PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
PAY AND NIGHT IV IRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 101.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1921.

PRICE FIVE

PRICE FIVE

GERMAN -ALLIED

BREACH

WIDENS

OFF ICIALS STARTF
INIESTI6ATION OFL00 RC
M. C. FREES ITS ENGINEER AND
FIREMAN OF BLAME
AFTER PROBE
DEATH-TOLL OF CRASH
IS FINALLY SET AT 37
Preliminary' Inquiry by Interstate
Commerce Commission
Started
(By Associated Press)
Porter, Ind., March 1. - Responsi-
bility for the wreck of the Michigan
Central Canadian flyer and the New
York Central interstate limited at an
intersection here Sunday night, when
87 persons were killed, had not been
determined tonight. Each road blames
the other for the accident.
The Michigan Central made known
its stand today for the first time. It
announced that an investigation con-
ducted at Niles, Mich., had cleared of
blame William Long and George
Block, engineer and fireman, respec-
tively, of its train.
All the dead had been identified to-
day, and Dr. H. O. Seipel of Valparai-
so, the corner, said he did not think
there were any persons missing be-
cause he had had no inquiries from
relatives.
Dr. Seipel tonight said he would
start an investigation this week prob-
ably in Valparaiso and that it would
be secret. He declared the crews of
both trains were under surveillance
and that he could reach any member
of either crew within an hour.
Four officials of the Interstate Com-
merce commission arrived today from
Washington and immediately began
preliminary investigation.
LESION POST STARTS
DRI E FOR MEMBERS
EVERY EX-SERVICE MAN WILL
BE ASKED TO JOIN
POST
A campaign for at least 500 new
members is being opened today by the-,
University post of the American Legion
in the hopes of being able to carry
on a greater amount of activity and
to be of greater service, not only to
the main organization, but also to the
local membership and to the Univer-
sity as well.
Two committees, with Donald B.
Russell, '21, and James Hess, '21, as
chairmen, have been formed, and they
are making preparations for a cam-
pus wide visiting campaign tomorrow
to invite every service man of the
University into the local post. Men-
who signify their intention now of
joining the University post will re-
ceive their membership for a fee of
$2.00. This amount not only includes
the regular membership dues but it
also makes each man a regular re-
cipient of the American Legion week-
ly, the subscription price of which
equals the dues of this post.
Only in the case of men who join
during the drive, however, will this
amount cover the entire yearly mem-

bership, as it is the intention of the
post to charge an initiation fee for
every man who applies for member-
ship after next Wednesday.
-r

BAKER FUNERAL
THIS AFTERNOON
The burial of Joseph L. Baker, '21E,
who was killed in the Michigan Cen-
tral-New York Central train wreck
near Porter, Ind., Sunday night, will
take place at 2:30 o'clock this after-
noon at his home in El Paso, Ill.
During his years at Michigan Baker
was an excellent shot-putter, win-
,ning this event in the Western Con-
ference track meet in 1919 and 1920.
Last spring he qualified for the Am-
erican Olympic team, but for some
unknown reason he did not go to
Belgium. He was a member of Tri-'
angles, Vulcans, and Griflins, the
Craftsman club, and the Delta Chi
fraternity. He was also a member of
the Episcopa church.
Four men, John S. Kyser, '21, Wil-
fred R. Laurie, '22L, Douglas F. Park,
'22E, and Ben W. Winter, '21, have
left for El Paso to attend the funeral.
TUR NER RECEIVES
DEBATE CHLLENGE
Acknowledges Invitation to Discuss
Irish Question with Miss Mary
M'Swinney
PROFESSOR INTENDS TO SEND
ANSWER IN A SHORT TIE
Prof. E. R. Turner, of the history
department, has acknowledged the re-
ceipt of a challenge from the Ameri-
can Association for Recognition of
the Irish Republic to debate Miss Mary
M'Swinney, sister of the late Terence
M'Swinney, lord mayor of Cork,
March 29, in the largest obtainable
auditorium in Cleveland, O. Accord-
ing to Professor Turner, he has the
intention of answering the challenge
in a short time.
The action of the association is said
to have come as a result of the pro-
fessor's criticism of the validity of
various statements of Miss M'Swin-
ney.
Last Jan. 24 Professor Turner gave
a public lecture on the Irish question,
which was largely attended, in the
Western Reserve university auditor-
ium in Cleveland. The same day and
the preceding evening, Miss M'Swin-
ney had spoken in an attempt to get
the United States government to rec-
ognize the independence of the Irish
republic.
It was this that the professor par-
ticularly opposed, saying that it
would be mostunwise for the United
States to do this as such an action
would make the relations between
Great Britain and the United States
much worse. Professor Turner also
pointed out how this recognition
might probably lead to what some
Irish-American phoenetics are urg-
ing - war.
COMEDY CLUB PLAY
GOING TO PT. HURON
The Comedy club has been invited
to present its play, "Bunty Pulls the
Strings," in Port Huron by the U. of
M. club of that city. Permission has
been granted by the committee on
student affairs to make the trip, and
according to present plans the play
will be given in that city March 16.
This is the first time in seven years
that the club has presented its play
out of town. The members of the cast

will be the guests of the Michigan
alumni of Port Huron at a dinner
and dance following the play.
Tickets for the Ann Arbor produc-
tion of the play which will be given
March 9 at the Whitney will go on
sale Thursday at Graham's book-
store on State street.
With a program in charge of the
new members which will. consist of
two one act plays, the Comedy club
will hold its regular meeting at 7:30
o'clock tomorrow night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. One of the
plays is to be given under the direc-
tion of Arthur McCaffery, '23, while
the other will be supervised by Joyce
McCurdy, '22. Plans for the annual
dance will be discussed,

OPERAREHEARSAS
ADVANE STEADIL
Schedule of Practices Announced;
Much Work Needed to Attain
Greatest Success
INELIGIBILITY HITS NUMBER
' OF MEN PICKED FOR PLACES
Rehearsals for the Union opera,
"Top o' th' Mornin'," are on in earnest
at the workshop at the beginning of
the third week of practice. Tomorrow
E. Mortimer Shuter, director, will ask
for even more concentration by the
40 member of the chorus and 12 mem-
bers of the cast.
Rehearsal Schedule Announced
The schedule for rehearsals was an-
nounced yesterday as follows: All
week days except Saturday, chorus
from 4 to 5:45 o'clock and from 7 to
8 o'clock; cast, from 8 to 10 o'clock
each evening. The Saturday program
is almost continuous from 11 o'clock
in the forenoon until 10:30 o'clock in
the evening. Rehearsals of the 10
solo dancing numbers of the chorus
required from 11 o'clock last Satur-
day morning until 8 o'clock that night,
the cast practicing from 8 to 10:30
o'clock.
"While the spirit shown by the cast
at practices in other years was al-
ways good, I must say that more inter-
est and enthusiasm is being shown at
rehearsals this year. Practices are go-
ing smoothly, because they have been
systematized," said Mr. Shuter yes-
terday.
Ineligibility Hits Opera
Fligibility reports have been re-
ceived on a number of men who were
picked for places in the opera but
whose marks are now declared to be
low. It is expected that by tomorrow
Mr. Shuter will know just who will
remain. Second choice men will be
called to take the places of the in-
elibles.
Judge Grant, '59,
Dies In Florida
After Operation
Judge Claudius B. Grant, '59, of De-
troit, former Regent and member of
the state supreme court for 20 years,
died in a hospital at St. Petersburg,
Fla., Monday morning following an
operation for gall-stones. He was 85
years of age.
Judge Grant was the author, in 1871,
of a bill which became a law, to ap-
propriate $75,000 to erect University
hall. In his second term he was re-
sponsible, more than any other one
man, for the passage of a bill laying
a tax of one-twenthieth of a mill on
the assessed valuation of the state for
the support of the University, a meas-
ure of prime importance in the history
of Michigan.
Shortly after this Judge Grant mov-
ed to Houghton, where he soon became
a leader of his profession in that sec-
tion. He served as judge of the 25th
Michigan court for eight years, and
in 1889 he was elected to the Michigan
supreme bench, serving two ten year'
terms. He was elected Regent of the
University in 1871, serving in that
capacity for eight years.
In 1891 the Board of Regents of the
University conferred upon Judge
Grant the honorary degree of LL.D.
In 1863 Judge Grant married Miss Car-
oline Felch, eldest daughter of the
late Gov. Alpheus Felch, of Ann Ar-

bor, who survives him, together with
two children, Mrs. E. G. Runnels, of
Marion, Ohio, and Mrs. Chester Barn-
es, of Kenosha, Wis.
The body will be brought to Ann
Arbor for burial.
TRUEBLOOD ON PLAYERS CLUB
PROGRAM FOR THIS EVENING
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood will beI
the principal speaker at the regular
meeting of the Players club to be held
at 7:15 o'clock tonight in Alumni Me-
morial hall. Besides the principal
talk, several other speakers have been
secured. The program for the rest of
the year will be given out. All mem-
bers are entitled to bring one guest.

BOCHE PROPOSALS
NOT SAISFACTORY
Hun Government Seems to Have Com.
plete Misunderstanding of Real-
Ities, Says Lloyd George
NEGOTIATIONS ENDED, ALLIES
ON EVE OF ACTION-BELIEF
London, Mar. 1-When German dele-
gates faced the Allies with the object
of coming to a final settlement of the
German indemnities, a gulf was re
vealed even wider than any predic-
tions had forecast. Germany's coun-
ter proposal fell so short of the Al-
lied program drawn up at Paris that
the British prime minister declared,
"The German government appears to
have a complete misunderstanding of
the realities of their position." Turse-
ly adjourned the conference.
The belief prevails in Allied circles
tonight that the negotiations have
ended and that the Allies are on the
eve of action. A reply is expected to
be an ultimatum, clear an imperative.
The following bulletin was issued
after a brief meeting of the heads of
the Allied delegation this afternoon:
"It was decided to conlu&d the
judicial and military advisers to-
morrow with a view to informing
the German delegation on Thurs-
day as to the emasures the Allies
propsed to take."
The word, "measures," and mention
of the only judicial and military ad-
visers are considered significant,
LEND TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES,
DECLARES DETROIT BANKER
"There is an excellent chance to-
day for the United States to build for
herself a potential and enduring for-
eign trade if Americans will only put
their trust in long time securities and
advance sufficient funds to foreign
countries to tide them over their hour
of crisis." Such was the theme of
the address delivered before mem-
bers of the Commerce club last night
by Edmund D. Fisher, vice-president
of the Bank of Detroit, and an em-
inent figure in the banking circles of
the country.
"Though the United States has un-
limited natural resources she has only
in the last five years reached the posi-
tion of financial independence and un-
til the outbreak of the World War was
paying tribute to England in that our
periods of depression were utilized
by England to speculate in our secur-
ities and reap large rewards," he de-
clared.
DR. HALL AIDS FRATERNITIES
IN CHARTING SCHOLARSHIP
For the benefit of fraternities and
sororities Registrar Arthur G. Hall
has sent to the president of each or-
ganization information relative to the
computing of a scholarship chart for
last semester. The chart will enable
the fraternity or sorority to make a
comparison of its standing for last
semester with preceding semesters.
In the calculation, the total number
of hours of A. B. C. D. and E grades
should be multiplied by 1.00, .85, .70,
.40, and .0 respectively. Adding these,
the resulting figure should be divided
by the total number of completed
hours of the fraternity, ommitting I
and X grades. The percentage ob-
tained will be the standing of the
fraternity in scholarship.
Two Seniors to Speak at Wayne

"Why Go to the University?" is the
question to be answered by Aletha
Yerkes, '21, and Marguerite Clark, '21,
Wednesday night at Wayne, where
they have been invited by the superin-
tendent of schools to speak to the
high school girls of that village.
BULLETIN
Helsingfors, Mar. 1.-- Varsai
Ostorf, suburb of Petrograd, is in
the hands of insurgents, and fight-
ing is continuing between sailors
and workmen, according to re-
ports received here. Rumors are
current that Lenine and Trotsky,
the Bolsheviki premier and war
minister, respectively, have fled
to the Crimea.

UNION MOVIE SEEN
BY 2,500 STUDENTS
An excellent movie, a backface
comey, nd II SEATEROW
chestra filled out an evening's enter-
tainment for the 2,500 students who BIER NAVAL BL
viewed the Metropolitan Movie pro-
gram at 7:30 o'clock last night in FRANKLY DISCUSSED BEHIND
Hill auditorium under the auspices CLOSED DOORS DURING TWO
of HOUR SESSION
The feature, a Lois Weber produc-
tion entitled "What's Worth While,"
was well received by the crowd and ACTION EXPECTED ON
encores were called for from the NAVY APPROPRIATION
Union orchestra, which provided mu-
sic during the feature. J. H. Tuttle, Mandate Over Island of Yap Called
'23, who entertained with a negro ser- Serious and Delicate Problem
mon and songs, was equipped from of Future
razor to red bandana and made a hit
with the audience. (By Associated Press)
Washington, March 1.- The sen-
ate frankly discussed relations be-
tween the United States and Japan
S for two hours late today behind clos-
ed doors, but the situation as pre-
sented by Republican leaders failed to
shake opposition to the naval appro-
WORK WILL BE COMIFENCED I. priation bill.
MEDIATELY, SAYS After. the doors were open Senator
Borah, Republican of Idaho, and other
CISSEL leaders in the fight against the bill
decalred emphatically that the meas-
Contracts for the construction of ure in its present form could not be
movable wooden stands on Ferry field passed before congress adjourns Fri-
have been awarded since the last day.. The senate then went into a
meeting of the Board in Control of long night session with a promise by
Athletics and material is probably on Senator Poindetxer, Republican of
its way, according to Prof. J. H. Cis- Washington, in charge of the bill, that
sel, consulting engineer to the board. it would be held in continuous ses-
Work will be commenced immedi- sion until' action had been taken one
ately on the movable stands for the way or another.
baseball diamond, and it is planned to Moves Secret Session
have them completed in time for this The motion for the secret session
season's big games. The seating ca- was made by Senator Lodge, of Mass-
pacity of the movable stands will be achusetts, the Republican leader and
approximately 2,000. They will be so chairman of the senate foreign rela-
constructed that they may be easily tions committee. He interrupted a
transported to the gridiron for fall long open debate on the bill express-
use. Several other units will he con- ing the hope that the measure would
structed to increase the capacity of be passed by this congress and added
the stadium. that there were "some angles" of the
"Competition among bidders was question which should not be discuss-
quite active," said Professor Cissel in ed in public.
commenting on the contract. The When the galleries had been clear-
work was awarded to the Cooper, Wid- ed Senator Lodge was understood to
enmann Construction company of De- have presented no information re-
troit. T. W. Weidenmann, '09, is a gading controversies between the
graduate of the mechanical engineer- United States and Japan other than
ing department. G. D. Douglas,'15CE, that over the California alien land
does the estimating work for this com- law.
pany. Discuss Japan's Mandate
One of the matters said to have
been discussed was the Pacific island
P of Yap over which Japan holds a man-
" " " date. The United States had vigor-
Camp us tic vmles ously protested against this mandate
Sto the council of the League of Na-
Student activities were treated in -tions and also has taken the subject
an exhaustive paper, presented before up direct with the Japanese govern-
Acolytes, campus philosophical so- ment. Several senators were report-
ciety last night, by A. E. Johnson and ed to have expressed the view that
C. R. Adams, '22. Practically all ex- the controversy with regards to the
tra-scholastic work among students in isand was certain to become a Be-
any form of recognized organization rious and delicate problem in the near
came in for attention, most of it con- future.
demnatory. Publications, athletic or-
ganizations, Union activities, and fra- JUNIOR LIT CLASS MAY PAY
ternities were all discussed, and at DUES TOMORROW OIFRIDAY
the close of the paper eight sugges-
tions for reform were given. Junior lit class dues will be paya-
More effective faculty control and a ble for two days, tomorrow and Fri-
strict enforcement of a maximum time day, of this week. The booth in the
limit for student activities were sug- main corridor of University hall will
gested in the paper, which was an at- be opened for this purpose from 8 to
tack on the present over-organization 4 o'clock each day.
and which also suggested plans for Less than one-tenth of the class
diminishing the present evil. Meas- paid their dues on the combined class-
ures will be taken by Acolytes to have dues day held before the Christmas
the article printed in full for All- holidays, according to F. M. Smith,
campus consumption, if such a step is class treasurer. Hugh W. Hitchcock,
possible. chairman of the social committee,
stated that after consulting with the

NO MORE 'ENSIANS treasurer it was found that it would
be impossible to give social functions
SOLD AFTER TODAY of any sort unless all members of the
class pay their dues during the pres-
" This afternoon at 5 o'clock will see ent campaign.
the close of the Michiganensian drive
for subscriptions. According to the DEAN BURSLEY WILL MOVE
business manager, no copies will be TO NEW OFFICE NEXT WEEK
obtainable after that time. In previ-
ous years enough copies have been or- Beginning the first of next week the
dered to supply orders coming in as offices of Joseph A. Bursley, Dean of
late as May or June, but this year on Students, will be established in the
account of higher costs of production suite of rooms in University hall,
a continuance of the old custom is im- formerly occupied by Dean John R.
possible. Effinger, of the literary college. The
Managers of the subscription drive rooms are now being remodeled and
expect big results in this last day of will be a great improvement over the
campaign, as they believe the campus former office. Ante room space will
is fully aware of the fact that today be twice as large as formerly and light
really closes the 1921 year book will be from two large windows in the
drive. western part of the room.

'i

SENIOR, JUNIOR MEN TO
MEET SUNDAY AT UNION
All senior and junior men are
requested to meet at 3:30 o'clock
Sunday afternoon in the As-
sembly hall of the Union to hear
and discuss the reports of the
various committees on student
government.
THE STUDENT COUNCIL,
LeGrand A. Gaines, Jr.,
President.

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