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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 01, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER O THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Lblished ever morning except Monday during the Univer-
ear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
ication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
d in this paper and the local news published therein.
ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
bscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
ffices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
.ones: Business, '.6o; Editorial.2414.
ommunications not toexceed 3o0words, if signed, the sig-
not necessarily to appear in print, but- as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
ion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daiely ffice.
*ed communications will receive no consideration. No an-
twill be returned unless the writer incluses postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
d in the communications.
What'sGoing On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
evening preceding insertion.n

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor ...........................Chesser M. Campbell
Editors,"-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
e . Dakini J.E. McManis
Editor... '... .................A.ernste
ditor -... . ... . .. ,B. P. Campbell
ala............. Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
.. .................., ...Robert Angell
n's Editor............. ..............Mary D. Lane
ph ............................ ....Thomas Dewey
pe ..................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
ine Wald* Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
~Weber Leo J. Hershdorfer 'Walter Donnelly
th Vickery Hughston McBain Beata Hasley
Clark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
.Reinder JA. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
y Monfort WV. W. Ottaway Edward 'Lambrecht
B. Grundy Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
s Oberholtzer J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waler
E. Adams Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
L. Stone M. A. KlaverV

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
NESS MANAGER...........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
tising .... ..............................D. P. Joyce
ds..........".................. .........Ro*t.O0 Kerr
anton ..... ........ -.....-...........-.-M.--ea
ltion . ..............-.....................V. V. Hillery
Assistants N.W Roetn
Lambrecbt P. R Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
Gower F. A. Crass R. C. Stearnes
and Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
r W. Millard M. M. Moule- D. G. Slawson
Hamel It. D . S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

LAMAuca ja.

-1 -7 , , --- -- - -

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
sue of lihefrnst Dailyrshold see the nYight editor, who has full charge
f all' news to be printed that night.
TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1921.,__
Night Editor-HUGH W. HITCHCOCK
The eddorial staff and tryouts will meet at 5
'clock this afternoon. The upper staff will meet
t 4:30 o'clock.
ONE MAN'S INFLUENCE
Once more death has cast its shadow upon the
Jniversity by the news that a railroad wreck near
hicago Sunday evening claimed the life of Joseph
. Baker.
"Joe" Baker was a man counted on by his team-
iates not only for points but for a genial, good-
earted friendliness which was as unfailing a trait
f his character as the steadiness which overcame
is handicap in weight and made him a field ath-
ete of the first rank. His willingness to go out of
is way to aid others who had no call upon him ex-
ept as acquaintances or co-workers was often com-
iented upon by men whose conceptions of fellow-
hip were not of so broad a humanity. The influ-
:nce of such a trait is always far-reaching; every
ontact with such a man creates a better fraternity
I feeling and action, disposes others to forget
heir own grievances sand pt a happier face on
iatters, and makes for the highest spirit of team-
rork whether in athletics or in the routine relation-
hips of life.
Baker's character was a living and active force
or goodwill among men. His memory will con-
nue to influence the host of those who were in-
ebted 'to his kindness as well as the close friends
rho were privileged to know him well.
WHY NOT POST THE MARKS?
Enginesring grades are sent out within a day or
vo after the finals are marked. Beforle classifica-
on each wielder of the mystic slip stick knows
there he stands scholasticly. From the very be-
inning of the semester he can put his best efforts
ito his work, free from any fear that he may have
> rearrange his schedule two weeks or so after
etting started.
Contrasted with the engineering system is that
; vogue in the more populous literary department.
'here marks are not given out until at least a fort-
ight after the election of courses. % With nothing
> show them what courses they have passed not a
ew students in this college begin the semester hand-
:apped by uncertainty, putting forth only half-
earted effort, and making a slow start. And if they
re actually forced to make new elections because
f failures brought out by their marks, they go in-
> new courses minus a half month of essential
roundwork.
In view of the manifest inconvenience and hard-
hip of its present plan, why can't the literary col-
ge introduce a system through which standings
ill be given out with the same dispatch as is pres-
it in the engineering method? Because of the
fference in attendance in the two schools, the same
rocedure used in'the quadrangle probably could
>t be employed in University hall. But if the same
sult could be brought about, in a more informal
anner if necessary, it would be a great assistance
Y students in the selection of courses and getting
>wfl to work from the start.
In the solution of the problem the suggestion that
eofessors be allowed to post final marks on the

doors of their classrooms seems to be a highly feas-
ible one. As class records are supposed to be com-
pleted in time to be given to the Registrar three days
after the final examinations, this could be done
without much trouble so that students could come
around and get their grades. Perhaps some better
plan that this could be devised, but the need for an
improvement of some kind is obvious.
THE NEWSPAPERS AND CRIME
Recently a young clerk in one of Chicago's banks
stuck a bundle of bonds nonchalantly under his arm
and walked out of the establishment. He had prev-
iously been honest, was unskilled and without ma-
lice of forethought, merely a youngster tempted by
the stupendous sum of, money that he had in his
power. He had no definite plans concerning es-
cape, in fact he rather expected to be caught, but
nevertheless he sought to emulate the romantic ex-
ploits of others about whom he had read.
He was caught in an unspectacular manner, of-
fered no resistance, and immediately confessed his
guilt. Yet the leading journal of the Western me-
tropolis, under a two inch ribbon headlines on the
first page, opened its account of the young man's
apprehension as follows: "William Dalton, i year
old premier bank robber of his generation, was ar-
rested yesterday." Jesse James in his balmiest day
could have hoped for nothing more flattering.
Surely the newspapers of the country should call a
spade a spade, and not furnish food for the hun-
gry imagination of adventurous American youths
by making a heroic figure out of an ignorant office
boy because of his yielding to a childish temptation.
UNITING THE EDITORS
'The almost unanmous hail of co-operation which
greeted The Daily's call for a Conference Editorial
association is not only gratifying, but indicative of
the genuine desire to get together on policies of
student journalism, student government, student
problems of all kinds which has grown in direct ra-
tio with the misunderstandings and lost opportuni-
ties of the past few years. Realization that every
school of the Big Ten can really help the rest by
passing on the ideas with which it has successfully
met its own campus needs is at the bottom of this
fine response.
The idea is essentially simple; its basis is a scheme
of annual conventions attended by college publica-
tion editors for the year to come. The editors have
their eyes on student sentiment as perhaps no other
class; they hold the reins of publicity and can set it
going for whatever common undertakings and pol-
icies the conventions may decide. They will learn
to appreciate' by personal contact the opinions and
the spirit of other schools. Not adverse comment,
but a sincere attempt to understand the facts, would
be the reaction of these men on receiving news
Which might lower their respect for other universi-
ties. Happly, the, plan comes right on the wave
of an era of real friendship within the Conference,
which it may help to retain and extend.
At present there is a real need of a common ath-
letic standard throughout the country on the ques-
tion of eligibility. Student morals and student ac-
tivities and student unions are coming in ofr their
share of discussion on every campus; but there is
no place where such discussion could be more
worthwhile than around such a council table as that
which the proposed association contemplates.
United within by closer bonds of common ideas and
ideals, and standing as one for the plans and reso-
lutions adopted, theConference under such a plan
will not only be better prepared for internal prog-
ress, but will stand in a greater position of respect
and influence before the country at large.
The Telescopes
His Mark
It lay on his desk before him,
It lay there - it did not lie.
It had come to say he had won the day,
Or to ask the reason why.

Then he breathed a prayer to heaven
For the courage he did not feel,
And with a mighty effort
Broke open the fateful seal.
He thought of all the lectures
Through which he had peacefully slept,
And the hosts of "Not prepared, sir's"
Because of the dates he had kept.
But it had come -- here before him,
On this his day of days,
What ! Lord, is it true - sixteen hours
And every orne of them A's?
His blood began tingling wildly,
He could hardly endure the shock
And then with a yawn that was half a groan
He awoke - and turned off the clock.
Jay Gould.
Dear Noah :
Is it true that the name "The Intellectual City of
the West" has often been applied to, Ann Arbor?
K. L. S.
We regret to say that we are unable to answer
your question, but we do know that about this time
of year Ann Arbor's name is "MUD".
Famous Closing Lines
"I'll join you in a minute," said the minister to
the couple who were waiting to be married.
NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITEDI NES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. M.,,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
pressestat 9:48 a. m. and exer' two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit--5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. .m., and
12:10 p.m.

J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street
ANN ARBOR, - - MICHIGAN

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LARGEAUDENCE HEARS
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY
MME. CLARA CLEMENS ARTIST ON
MU'SICAELE PROGRAM TO-
MORROW NIGHT
(By S. B. C.)
Perhaps the largest audience of the
season at any faculty concert was in
attendance at that of the University
Symphony orchestra with Albert
Lockwood as piano soloist, Sunday
afternoon. Mr. Lockwood's work
proved to be very popular with those
present and after cpntinued applause
he played one of his numbers, "Rhap-
sody .d'Auvergne," by Saint-Saens, for
a second time.
The work of the orchestra itself
was of the highest calibre for an
amateur organization. Samuel Pier-
son Lockwood, its conductor, has
brought about an improvement which:
can well be said to be amazing.
The interpretation of Schubert's
"Unfinished Symphony," and that of
Mueller-Berghaiis' transcription of
Liszt's "Second Hungarian Rhapsody,"
showed the fine spirit of co-operation
characteristic of the orchestra.
Mine. Clara Clemens, mezzo contral-
to, the artist on the next program *of
the Matinee Musicale society to be
given at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in
Pattengill auditorium. This concert
takes the place of that of the Ypsilanti
Normal choir which was scheduled for
March 15.
The program which Madame Clem-
ens wjil give is to be made up .en-
tirely from the work of Brahms. It
includes: "Beneath Her Window,"
"'Neath the Willow Trees," "The Swal-
low's Homeward Fly," "Sunday," 'The
Blacksmith," "Serenade," "Sunbrown
Lad," "Do Thy Thoughts Sometimes,"
"Roses Three, All on a Tres," "Sap-
phic Ode," "The Little Sandman,"
"Oh! Come Bewitching Summer
Night," "Ever Lighter Grows My
Slumber," "A Little Bird," "On Sun
day Morn," "The Hasty Oath," "The
Maiden's Song," "My Love is Green as
the Lilac Bush.'
Margaret Mannebach will be at the
piano.

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