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March 01, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY

Lhp Bk

VOI XXXI No. 100.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 1921.

JOE BAKER,

'21E, KILLED

.Varsity
MICHIGAN FIGHT
AND DUNNE TAKE
PURDE CONTEST'
BOILERMAKERS MAKE ONLY ONE
FIELD GOAL DURING SEC-
OND HALF 1
REA, WILLIAMS PLAY
BIG PART IN RESULT
Wolverines Rave Off Night Shooting
Baskets, Miller and White Star
for Purdue ,
FLASH BULLETINS
Eanston, Ill., Feb. 28, 11 P. M.-
University of Iowa basketball quintet
defeated Northwestern University heref
tonght, 20 to 14. No details of the
game had been received up to the time
of going to press.
Columbus, 0., Feb. 28.-IllinoIs de-
feated Ohio State here tonight, 85 to
34 ,in a clean game with a whirlwind
,'knish. The score was 31 all two mi-
utes before the close of the game, but
the Illuni registered two baskets and
won. By winning this game the Uni-
versity of Illinois remains tied with
Indiana for first place, with six games
won, and three lost. Purdue dropped
into a tie for third by losing to Mich-
igan at Ann Arbor.
Michigan fight and Dunne's bril-
liant shooting in the last half made
Michigan a 19 to 15 winner over Pur-
due University in Waterman gymnas-
ium, Monday night. The Wolverines
went into the second half one point,
behind, on a 10 to 9 score, but Dunne's
four feld baskets and one by Rea
coupled with guarding by eRa and
Williams that held the opposing team
to one field basket, thrown by Lev-
erenz with 50 seconds to play, gave
Michigan a final margin of four
points.
Many Shots Missed .
Boths teams missed many basket
shots, and in this respect the Maize
and Blud was not the team that play-
ed Illinois to a standstill Saturday.
Captain Karpus was brilliant on the
floor but had an off night on fouls,
throwing only one in eight attempts.
Michigan scored first, when Karpus
dropped a foul shot. White, Boiler-
maker leader, followed with a like
feat, and then gave Purdue a lead on
his second counter. Prom this point
until the end of the half Purdue was
in the lead. Baskets by Karpus and
G. W. Miller pulled the Varsity to
within one point of Purdue at the close
of the initial period. After three
minutes of fast play in the second halfE
Dunne caged the best shot of the eve-
ning, and from then on Michigan was
out of danger, having an eight point
lead at one time.
Second Half Better
Michigan was better in the second!
half, showing a more finished offense
and Rea and Williams guarding the
Purdue forwards olesely.l
R. F. Miller and White were Pur-
due's best players. Miller covered the
Michigan basket shooters time aftert

time as they came down the floor, and
White, in addition to showing himself
tit be fast running guard, was the{
high point maker of th@ evening, with
seven foul goals, and one field ring-
er, for nine points.
1Ucbjgain Purdue
Karpus ,.....,.L+. .......Chaffee,
Nversman, Leverenze
0, W, Miller . ... R.F.... ., Masters, a
Holwordai
Dunne.........C............Cofiing1
Williams .......L.G....... White (c)
Rea .........R.G.....R. F. Miller
Field baskets-Dunne 4, Karpus 2,1
G. W. Miller 2, Rea; White, Evers-
man, Masters, Leverenz. Foul goals-1
Karpus 1-8; White 7-14. Score-first
half, Purdue 10, Michigan 9.]

Wins,

19-15

fanking A nd Foreign Trade" Topich
Of L. D. Fisher 's Address Tonight

Edmund D. Fisher, vice-president
of the Bank of Detroit, who speaks at
8 o'colck this evening in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium on the subject,
"Banking and Foreign Trade," is said
to be a figure of international prom-
inence. He is a member of the Per-
manent Group on Paraguay and also
of the Inter-American High Commis-
sion. His talk, the first of the Com-
merce club series, will be open to
all members interested.
A dinner in honor of Mr. Fisher
will be given at 6:15 o'clock this
evening at the Union, to which a lim-
ited number of tickets can still be ob-
tained by application at the Com-
merce club's offices in room 141 Nat-
ural Science building. Membership
cards can also be obtained at the
same place from 12:50 o'clock until 2
this afternoon.
FIVE FAVORED FOR
ATHLETIC DIETOR

Yost, Fitzpatrick, Craig, Sharpe,
Rickey May Hold New
lEsition

or

r

/

DECISION EXPECTED WHEN
REGENTS MEET ON MARCH 25
Fielding H. Yost, Keene Fitzpatrick,
James Craig, Branch Rickey, and Al
Sharpe have been prominently men-
tioned as possible choices for the post
of director of athletics which was re-
cently instituted by the Board of Re-
gents in line with its policy of one-
man athletic control.
Coach Yost's association with Uni-
versity football for the past 20 years
has won him many backers for the
new job. Fitzpatrick, considered by
many as the greatest track coach in
the country, is at present coaching at
Princeton. He was on the University
coaching staff some years ago and his
return to Michigan would be wel-
comed by many alumni who remember
his work.
James Craig was a track and foot-
bell star here about seven years ago,
and is on Yost's All-time Michigan'
eleven. He kept up his athletic inter-
ests after graduation in 1913, having
done considerable coaching since'
then.
Branch Rickey, now vice-president
of the St. Louis Cardinals, graduat-
ed from the Law school in 1912, after
receiving his A.B. from Ohio Wes-
leyan, where he took part. in all
sports. While attending the Law
school here he coached the baseball
team. He managed the St. Louis
Browns before becoming vice-presi-
dent of the Cardinals.
Al Sharpe, at prefent director of
athletics at Yale, is known to Michi-
gan men by the football teams he sent
out from Cornell a few years back.
At that university he coached foot-
ball, baseball, and basketball.
1 No definite decision is expected
from the Regents on their choice for
the position until the next Board
meeting, which occurs March 25.
Chnamber Concert
Delights Hearers
When the New York Chamber Mus-
ic society, directed by Carolyn Beebe,
finished its program last night in Hill
auditorium, it left an audience delight-
ed by the unique effects of its ensem-
ble and by the high quality of the
work given.
The last number, "Suite, 'Through
the Looking Glass,' Opus 12," of tht
American composer Deems Taylor, was
played in such a way as to give the at-
mosphere of the literary work by
Lewis Carroll on which it is based.

CHINES NOTICE
Ten sophomores are needed
for the editorial staff of Chimes.
Those desiring to try out should
apply to the editor from 4 to 6
o'clock on Tuesday and Wednes-
day in Chimes' office on the third
floor of the Union.
FEW ATHLETES ON
INE1.lGIBLE ,LIST
One Basketball Player on Probation;
Two Track Men Unable
to Compete
BASEBALL SQUAD SUFFERS
MOST, 4 STARS UNDER BAN
Early reports from the Athletic of-
fice indicate that ineligibility will in-
terfere to no great extent in the suc-
cess of Michigan's athletic events this
year. While few final lists of those
unable to participate in the various
sports have been compiled, conditions
appear favorable.
In basketball Pease is the only one
slated among the ineligibles. In this
sport all reports have been complet-
ed, as it was necessary to- determine
the status of all participators in last
Saturday's game.
With the definite report that prac-
tically all track men, with the ex-
ception of Hofstetter and Everett, are'
not on probation, track followers can
be assured of no difficulty in the
team's personnel on account of ineli-
gibility.+
Four men who played excellent ball
last year, Mraz, Turnbull, Leon
Parks, and Wimbles, were placed on
probation. As three of these men are
veterans and the fourth, Leon Parks,
showed great promise on the fresh-
mai team, things appear a little du-
bious in that sport. However, with
the large turnout to Coach Derrill
Pratt's call, Michigan should have
good chances for once again coming
ou$ first in the list of Conference
teams.
At the present time, nothing at all
definite has been determined concern-
ing the eligibility of football men,
but the Athletic office will soon give
the results of last semester's finals
concerning the probation of any grid-
iron men.
30 ITS RECEIJE LL A'S
Eighteen Men in List, Highest Num-
ber in History of College
Thirty students of the literary col-
lege received all A grades for the last
semester, according to a statement
made yesterday by Registrar Arthut
G. Hall. Of this number 18 were men
and 12 women. The men received the
highest number-of all A's of any se-
mester in the history of the literary
college. The following is the all A
list:
Ray L. Alexander, '24, Barbara Bak-
er, '23, Franklin W. Baske, '23, Wil-
liam L. Bonham, '23, Francis W.
Brown, '21, John C. Bugher, '21, Vel-
ma L. Carter, '24, Charlotte F. Cla-
gett, '24, Frieda S. Dickhoff, '24, Fred
G. Donner, '23, Violet H. Foster, '22,
Laurence M. Gould, '21, Herman J.,
Griffith, '24, Albert C. Jacobs, '21, Em-
ma G. Jacobs, '21, John B. Leighley,
'22, Robert S. Loeb, '24, Leonard B.

Parks, '24, Edward T. Ramsdell, '23,
Samuel R. Rosenthal, '21, Sydney
Sarasohn, '22, Donald Scott, '22, Mil-
dred F. Sherman, '21, Winifred Smea-
ton, '24, Marion R. Stahl, '23, Fran-
ces Swain, '23, Lucilla Walker, '24,
Lewis Wehmeyer, '21, Hilda E. Wes-
ter, '22, Katherine M Yerex, '24.

LONDON CONFERENCE
DECISION IS AWAITED
Paris Officials Show Desire to Hold
Action Until Harding States
American Policy
(By Associated Press) °
Paris, Feb. 28.-Great military ac-
tivity was noted today along that por-
tion of the Rhine occupied by France,
near the Mayence bridgehead. The
artillery which has been parked sever-
al miles behind the lines was brought
up as also were long lines of ammuni-
tion trucks, while the aeroplane camps
at Bourget on Villacoublay began to
show activity, commencing at noon to-
day. It is reported that the movement
of colonial troops arriving at Marseil-
les recently has increased.
Should the Germans formally de-
cline to accept the Allied reparation
demands at the London conference of
Allied powers with Germany, every-
thing is said to be in readiness to exe-
cute the penalties which were decided
on by Premiers Lloyd George and Bri-
and Sunday. at Chequers. The great-
est secrecy is being maintained as to
these penalties.
Marshall Foch is expected to return
tp Paris from London tomorrow with
General Weyeast and proceed immed-
iately to Mayence, there to await the
decision of the London conference.
The consensus of opinion in parlia-
mentary circles is that no decision
will be taken until the London con-
ference is aware of the content of the
inauguration speech of President
Harding, French officials are desirious
of showing the United States that
everything possible has been done to
avoid stern measures.

BRING UP
NEAR

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