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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 23, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILYtWEDNE

a--

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
rear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
>ication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ted in this paper and the local news published therein.
entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
)ffices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
'hones: Business. 960; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
-e not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
etion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily :office
fed commhunications will receive no consideration. No man-
pt will )e returned unless the writer incloses postage.
Tlic Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ed in the commnunications,
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor ....................... ....Chesser M. Campbell
t Editors-
T. H. Adam H. W. Hitchcock
J. L. Dakin 'J. E. McMarnjs
Renaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr.
.y Editor................................3J. A. Bernstein
Editor ................................B, P. Campbell
als............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. J. Whinery
a................................Robert Angell
en's Editor........................... Mary D. Lane
-aph ......................Thomas Dewey
ope .......................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
hine Waldo Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
G. Weber Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
eth Vickery Hughston Mc Bain Beata. Hlasley'
,Clark Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
,e Reindel J. A. Bacon Gerald P. Overton
hy Monfort W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
B. Grundy Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
es Oberholtzer J. W. Hume, Jr. Sara Waller
t E. Adams Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett
L. Stone M. A, Klaver

.

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
JSINESS MANAGER ...... ,LEGRAN)k % GAINES JR.
vertising........... ............. ..........C .1 oyce
ssifeds............... ...................Rout. 0. Kerr
blication ...................... ............... M. Heath
counts ..................................-. R. Priehs
culation......................................V. F. Hille
Assistants
W. Lambrecht P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
G. Gower F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
gmund Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
ster W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
J. Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchell

That Monday's misstatements should have gone
forth is a hard commentary on journalistic ethics.
That there was an underlying groundwork of fact
on which those misstatements, were based should
bring Michigan to a realization of the immediate
need of a cleanup. The new dean will find that the
great body of Michigan students understand the
situation; and he will also find that the fair policy
he has promised will open the way to a real stu-
dent and administration co-operatidn if continued
in the future.
RETURN THE BLUEBOOKS
Corrections, telegraphed back to gun-crews, give
the finishing touch to the deadly accuracy of artil-
lery fire. The target niay even be entirely hidden
from those manning the gun, yet if immediately
after each shot competent observers report where
it landed, it does not take the artillerymen long to
begin hitting the bull's eye with uncanny certainty.
In teaching, this method of profiting by mistakes
has an inportant application. When asked a ques-
tion, the student cannot know for a certainty
whether or not his views on the subject in question
are correct. He must have some means of check-
ing himself up, some way of comparing his answer
with the true one.
One of the most important ways of doing this is
through the prompt return of bluebooks. At present
this method is not being put to its full use in the
University. Some bluebooks are never returned
and the students who write them can have only a
hazy idea whether or not they hit the mark. Other
written examinations are given back after the fine
points of a subject have begun to blur in the minds
of those taking the course and so all possible bene-
fit is not derived. Still others, we are glad to say,
are handed back within only a short time after the
exam. The value of this promptness is attested to
by all who have been fortunate enough to take
courses where it is in vogue. Any inconvenience it
necessitates to instructors is fully compensated by
its benefits to the student body.
THE CALL FOR BASEBALL TRYOUTS
Once again the balmy days approach when we
will enter competition in a realm of athletics where
Michigan has of late been pre-eminently at the
fore - baseball; and Coah Pratt has already be-
gun strenuous work with his material.
It is not all clear sailing for the coach. Although
the tryouts this year number sixty or more, only
five of this number are old time Varsity men and
the rest are largely unknown quantities so far.
Coach Pratt must find a man for first base and an-
other for third. He must also discover a short-
stop, two outfielders, and a couple of catchers, as
well as a number of reserves.
These men must all be of a class worthy and ca-
pable of upholding old Michigan standards if this
year we are to prove up to our old reputation. But
this is not all; for after this season Captain Parks
and the five old-timers who are now supporting him
are not going to be here and Michigan is going to
have to rely on the material developed this year for
her standing in the near future. It's up to Michigan
to get every man of possible value out for practice
immediately.
"The plot," reads a subtitle of a recently-pro-
duced screen comedy, "is that the boy loves the girl,
and the rest just happens." Which, we might add,
must be the formula in nine out of ten movies now-
adays. Most of the plots "just happen." ,
the 2Telescope

TEXTBOOKS and SUPPLIES for All
Colleges at Both Stores
G R AIIA M
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

a JW"

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
e of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
i news to be printed that night.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1921.
Night Editor-T. W. SARGENT, JR.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
in Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. tn., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. 1n.
Locals toDeroit-5: 55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
FEBRUARY
S Xt T W T F S
1 2 8 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 2 26
27 28
lMen: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
1I11I llltiiilltli llllH lllH illl_
~The Blue Front ~
Cigar Store=
STUDENT OWNED
Corner of State and Packard
"'. 1iIul~lllllt111111111H1IIIImIiltlill
tiNTO
Ink Pencil
VERY woman admires the
dainty, always useu Onoto
Ink Pencil. It never leaks; can be
carried in any position. just the
tiing for handbag, dek or pocket
The Onoto Ink PencI lasts for-
# ever. No smu('ing-no fussy
leads to replace. It grites at the
first stroke.
Ma: by Thomais D La Rue &
Co., Ltd. of England.
Two kinds-plain and 18 Kt. gold
mounted.
Two prices $3.0O and $7.50.
HALLER & FULLER

Mimeographing and
Typewriting
No job too large nor too
small to receive caXeful
attention.
O. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade

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_uxD el RiDn rees GlfSitn
Sw
Al
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r S
_ A
- 111
_ OIS

SUGARBOWL
HOME MADE CANDY
ABSOLUTELY CLEAN
BEST LINE IN THE CITY
EVERYTHING
MADEIN ANN ARBOR
LIGHT LUNCHES
ANN ARBOR
SUGAR BOWL

_ ._ ..-r.-

MICHIGAN VS. THE YELLOW SHEET
"Take a Crack at the University" seems to be the
vew creed of yellow journalism in Michigan. The
-aking up and. sensationalizing of incidents which
a fact concern only a very negligible percentage
>f the student body - President Marion L. Bur-
:n placed it below five per cent - and the playing
p of such matter in scare headlines, some of them
ed, on the front page of the Detroit Times is an
ct which can in itself serve no purpose but to
arm the good name of the University throughout
he entire nation.
But when, in addition to this, the story beneath
le penny dreadful headlines is not true in many of
s main points; when its lies and half-lies and mis-
akes regarding Dean Joseph A. Bursley deliber-
tely place the University administration in a bad,
ght not only before the public but before the stu-
ent body; when the misapprehension thereby cre-
ted bids well to hinder the new dean of students
i his absolutely square attempt to co-operate with
he students, then it is certainly time for the entire
university community to take action to prevent
urther propaganda of this sort.
The first fact we must realize is that journalists
'ho will do such a thing once will probably be just
s willing to do it again. Michigan's first line of
ofense lies in a complete cleaning-up, so far as
>mbined student and faculty action can avail, of
Ze sort of incidents which make food for yellow
lumns, and which through exaggeration cast an
nplication on the character of Michigan students
; a whole. Probably no individuals have come to
sadder and wiser realization of this fact than the
en whose recent thoughtless conduct has brought
great a stigma not merely on them personally,
it on the University. These men were loyal stu-
mts, most of them, but they did not think. Our
sk in the future is to consider consequences - to
ce definitely not only the moral significance of
ir acts within the University community, but also
eir publicity significance outside.
Dean Bursley's program is open for every student
read. He is going to serve as the important per-
nal intermediary between the administration and
e students. His office is one long needed at Mich-
an. He is going to give advice where students
ant it, and he will stand beside every student who
right. He is to be no curfew-ringer, and above
l he hopes that the recommendation of disciplin-
y measures will be the smallest part of his office.
he placing of a man of his type in the position of
an of students is a warranty of fair dealing and a
lwark against the kind of misunderstanding which
s existed in the past. The students are going to
ve a better chance to ?be heard and, to have their
ins and purposes considered than ever before.
an Bursley stands for a better Michigan along
ery phase of student activities; and not repres-.
n, but assistance, is the groundwork of his

.

TRAIOt mARK REQ.US.PAT e'rC

*
Spring Shoes for
Young People

Born with February
Brand New Arrivals

For
Men

4..

For

Women

" Brogue" and Semi-Brogue effects

Brimful of the air of
"Dear Old Lunnontown"

Walk-Over Boot Shop

1

When a blooming dito dies,
Instead of saying things uncouth,
Be nice and merely say he died
In the very flower of his youth.

115~

"South Man Street

State St. Jewelers

Today's nominee for the Royal Order of Oil Cans
is the prof who conscientiously turns in every ab-
sentee on a "three-bolts" day.
The more we stick around Ann Arbor* when
school's not in session the more like home it seems-
there's no place like it, if you get what we mean.
Dear Noah-
Why do these fellows wear those silly little mus-
taches? Is it because they think the girls like them?
Vera Symple.
I suppose so, Vera. Some girls we know are al-
most tickled to death with them.

Girls are funny.
They'll ask you if you ever
Loved anybody else and then
When you turn around and ask them
The same question they get insulted
And want to know if they really
Look like an amateur.

IIU 1 11ri11U11 1tt1 1 1 1111U11 irIH111lm i1111111 HII1ill itil i1 Hi muut #1111111 11 Humlfll1NII 11rlilrU '.
- -
of leading makes
Corona ,
For Sale and Rent
on small monthly payments
L. C. Smith Cleaning and Repairing
= Specialty
O D. MORRILL
w
17 Nickels Arcade
_ -
i
iS
Underwood Royal
ir 1 , rrrrrr u~r11nanuirl m mrrrrrmur rmmmrrunrrrr rimmirtrnnnruumrmnnnmmmm mmmmm ummnu mmuni

The only criticism we have to make of most of
the girlish faces one sees on the campus is that
they're nat poetical - they won't stand scanning.
Famous Closing Lines
"A wrapped expression," he shouted as he saw
the pugilist's face all bandaged up.
NOAH COUNT.

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