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February 23, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-23

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLEI); PROBABLY
SNOW TOD)AY

rfSitr ita

~Iai1le

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND) NICUT 11
SERIC E

VOL. XXXI. No, 95. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1921. PRICE FIVE

TRANSPORTATION,
REOFIELD S TOPIC'
FOR THIS EVENING
MEETING IS PART OF HIGHWAY
ENGINEER AND TRANSPORT
CONFERENCE
DINNER AT 6 TONIGHT
AT UNION ON PROGRAM
President Burton to Give Introductory
Address; Dean Cooley Will
Preside at Banquet
William C. Redfield, former secre-
tary of commerce, and President Mar-
ion L. Burton will be the speakers
at the Transportation meeting at 8:30
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium. The
meeting is part of the program of
the Mid-western conference on high-
way engineering and highway trans-
port education which -is being held
here from Feb. 21 to 25.
Burton Opens Meeting
President Burton will deliver the
introductory address and Mr. Redfield
will speak on "The Trinity of Trans-
portation." There will also be a coi-
ctrt ,by the University band and the
highway transport motion picture,
"What's Your Hurry?" with Wallace
Reid ;s the star, will be shown. No
tickets will be required for admission
at the main entrances on North Uni-
versity avenue.,
Included on the program for today
is a highway transport dinner at 6
o'clock in the Union at which Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley of the engineer-
ing college will pteside. Tom Sny-
der, secretary of the Indiana Highway
Transport and Terminal association,
and A. R. Kroh, of the development
department of the Goodyear Tire and
Rubber company, will speak. The
dinner is open to students and mem-
bers of the faculty.
Large Attendance Expected
Acceptances of invitations to the
conference today indicate that many
universities throughout the Middle
Western states will be represented
and that there will be a large attend-
ance of educators, newspaper editors,
state, county, and municipal highway
officials, and representatives of motor
truck manufacturers and highway
transport companies.

Nt. Union Chosen
To Fa"e Varsity
In Opening Game
Mt. Union college has been chosen
by the Board in Control of Athletics
as Michigan's opponent in the opening
game Oct. 1. The listing of this game
completes the 1921 schedule as the
Conference ruling allow only seven
games. The date of Nov. 5 which
comes between the Illinois and Wis-
consin games will be left open, giving
the team a two weeks rest before the
two final games.
The athletic department exerted
every' effort to fill this date with Cal-
ifornia, but it was impossible to come
to an agreemeilt as the Bruins could
not cancel the game with the Univer-
sity of Southern California which they
had already billed. This is the first
time in 20 years that Case has not
appeared on Ferry field in the season
opener. Mt. Union has been on the
(Continued on Page Eight)
BARNES AUTHOR OF
'1921] OPERA BOOK
Music Written by George Roderick;
Additional Lyrics Accepted
From Robbins
"TOP 0' TH' MORNIN',"TITLE
OF THIS YEAR'S PRODUCTION
"Top o' th' Mornin'" was announc-1
ed yesterday as the title of the 1921
Union opera by E. A. Krueger, '21E,
general chairman. Russell Barnes,
'20, who wrote last year's "George Did
It," is the author of the book and
lyrics for this year's production, hav-
ing finished most of the work last
spring. The music was written by
George H. Roderick, '21E. Additional
lyrics were accepted from Buckley
Robbins, '23, and additional music
from Edward Meiss, '23, and Myron
Chon, '23.
"The 1921 opera should be the best
of any ever given at Michigan. The
book and plot are certainly the best.
Barnes profited a great deal by his
experience in writing last year's suc-
cessful opera, and has given us even
a better one this year," said Homer
(Continued on Page Eight)

PROTECT AMERICA SophomoreFrom
Tickets Placed On
Y C- ON Sale Tomorrow
Sophomore Prom tickets will go on
sale at 4:30 o'clock Thursday after-

STRINGENT BLUE LAWS AND PETTY
RE HGULATIONS TO HAVE N,9 PLACE
MICHIGAN CAMPUS, SAYS PRESID

FORMER AMBASSA DOI{ SAYS TIhAT
WASHINGTON WOULD HATE
FAVORED ASSOCIATION

noon at the ticket office in the main
lobby of the Union. There wil be
only 215 tickets printed for the affair,
and these are to be restricted to the
sophomore class. Every precaution

is to be taken to insure an equitable
FRENCH GOV'T PRESENTS distribution of the tickets, and it will
,TROPHIES AT EXERCISES be first come first served applicable,
hrwever, only to sophomores.
Lieut. do Wierzbecki Presents War Applicants for tickets must have
Memorials; Lands Bond Beteen paid their dues and will be listed and
French and Americans later checked up at the door by means
of class records and the numbers on
"I believe that Washington would thetickets. Class dues will beac-
have come to the conclusion, even cepted in the Union lobby at the time

though he said we should pursue the
even tenor of our way, that the best
way to protect America would be to
enter into some sort of co-operation
with other nations," said William
Graves Sharpe, '80L, former ambas-
sador to France, who spoke at the
Washington birthday exercises yes-
terday forenoon at Hill auditorium.
War trophies were formally pre-
sented to the University by Lieutenant
Vincent de Wierzbecki on behalf of
the French government, and were ac-
cepted by President Marion L. Bur-
ton on behalf of the University.
Declaring that America's duty to
the world demands her entrance into
some sort of an association of na-
tions, that disarmament was within an
easy range of possibility, and warn-
(Continued on Page Eight)
LECTURES ANNOUNCED
FOR SUMMER SESSION
Sixty-nine numbers constitute the
completed program of special lectures
and entertainments for the Summer
session of 1921, which was made up
by Dean E. H. Kraus, of the Summer
session. The program is subject to+
revision, and all lectures unless oth-
erwise specified will be delivered in
the Natural Science auditorium.
The program is as follows:
July 5
5 p. m.-Great Britian and America.
Prof. C. H. Van Tyne.
8 p. m.-Medical lecture.
July 6
5 p. m.-Public Utilities. Dean M. E.
Cooley.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty o the Un-
iversity School of Music. (Hill
auditorium).
July 7
5 p. m.-Selection and Administration
of Classes of Gifted Children. W.
G. Coburn, superintendent of
schools, Battle Creek.
8 p. m.-A Possible Future for Am-
erican Education. President M.
L. Burton. (Hill auditorium).
July 8
4 p. m.-Reception by President M. L.
Burton and Mrs. Burton for the
students and faculties of the Sum-
mer session. (Alumni Memorial
hall).
8 p. m.-The Art of Portraiture. (Il-
luetrated). Prof. H. R. Cross.
July 11
5 p. m.-Panama (in Spanish, illus-
trated). Gustave Michaud.-
8:30 p. m.-Visitors' night at the Ob-
5ervatory. Admission by ticket
only.
July 12
5 p. m.-The Public Schools of Mich-
igan. President D. B. Waldo, o
the Western State Normal school,
Kalamazoo.
8 p. m.-Medical lecture.
July 13
5 p. m.-The Flower Garden in Rela-
tjon to Small Homes. (Illustrat-
ed). Prof. A. Tealdi.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Un-
iversity School of Music. (Hill
auditorium).
(Continued on Page Four)

of the ticket sale in order to give the
dilinquent students a chance to buy
prom tickets.
The price of the tickets for the prom
this year has been fixed at $5, no war
tax being charged.
WIN19 WOM EN, ANDSONG
AUS END AT U OF M
-DETROIT DAILY TIMES.

BURSLEY BRANDS ARTICLE
AUTO CITY PAPER AS
FALSE

IN

Many Resignations Follow Row
A mong Women Religious Workers

Wholesale resignations due to fric-
tion and divergent ideas in the con-
duct of the women's branch of the S.
C. A. have accompanied the incorpora-
tion of the University Y. W. C. A. or-
ganization with the Students' Chris-
tian association. Despite the with-
drawal of many executive meribers of
the association a bitter fight is still
being waged between the two factions
for control of the religious activities
of the women students.
Women Withdraw
The first news of friction, which it
is claimed existed for a number of'
years, came with the withdrawal of a
number pf the women members from
the board of trustees which formerly
governed the Y. W. C. A. and the Y.
M. C. A. and which was to guide the
destinies of the S. C. A under the new
plan No reasons were given at the
time, but it is understood that those
resigning were not in sympathy with
the new organization as it affected
the women's department and desired
to continue under the nationial Y. W.
C. A. form. They also claimed that the
new organization contemplated taking
control of the Y. W. C. A. from women
and giving it to the men who compose
the majority of the S. C. A. board of
trustees.
The next step was the resignation of
the following students from the wo-

men's department cabinet: Mary D.
Lane, '21, vice-president; Helen Koch,
'21, treasurer; Elsa Oiese, '23; Martha
Seeley, '21; and Thekle Roese, '22. It
is said that the above students object-
ed to the complete control of the Y.
W. C. A. by the secretary, claiming
that =the members of the cabinet and
the officers were mere puppets who
could use no initiative or executive
ability in the performance of their
duties.
Secretaries Withdraw
The resignation of Miss Eva Lem-
ert, secretary of the Y. W. C. A., which
had been in the hands of the board of
trustees for two months, was accept-
ed soon after the above resignations
were turned in. It is understood that
Miss Lemert favored the S. C. A. plan
but felt that the friction and antagon-
ism in the cabinet and on the women's
advisory board made her withdrawal
desirable.
Miss Hulda Bancroft who had been
associate secretary of the Y. W. C. A.
social service department for five years
then tendered her resignation when
she was asked to take a position at
Lane hall under the S. C. A. organ-
ization. She is now acting as secre-
tary of the University hospital nurses'
unit which has withdrawn from the
S. C. A.
(Continued on Page Eight)

"I could have sent them to jail, I
could have had them pulled out before
the student- body and punished. But
that isn't my job, I sent them home."
Thus THE DETROIT DAILY TIMES
of Monday quotes J. A. Bursley, dean
of students, in a story headed "Wine,
Women and Song Days End at U. of
M."
Interview Implied
The story, which is a garbled state-
ment of facts concerning existing con-
ditions on the campus and an implied
interview with Dean Bursley, goes on
to say that a number of students are
expected "to slide out of town" with-
in the next few days in order to es-
cape punishment, and that the dean
said he was going "sled-length" to
clean up the University.
Themethods used by the adminis-
tration to get information are also "di-
vulged." "Most of the information in
the hands of the dean has come from
round-about sources," says THE
TINGES. "Much of it is gossip. Some
of it comes from men who are hired
to report student doings to the facul-
ty. A great deal of it has been gathered
from young women."
Statements Arle False
Yesterday afternoon a representa-
tive of The Daily showed Mr. Bursley
a copy of THE TIMES. "The state-
ments imputed to me in that story are
false," he said. "I have no more au-
thority to send a man home than you1
have, nor have I the power to send
a student to jail. The basis of this
article is a consultation I had with
four members of a fraternity Sunday
morning. The men came to me of
their -own accord and asked advice
about a certain matter concerning
their chapter. I knew one of the men
was a newspaperman, but I had no
idea that the confidential conversation
would be carried outside of those con-
cerned."
Insult to Students
"In regard to the University employ-
ing men to spy on the students, I
think it is an insult to both the stu-
dents and the administration to charge
them with such underhanded meth-
ods. We are not after the scalp of
everyone around here, we merely want
the men to conduct themselves as self
respecting citizens of a law abiding
community. Those who violate the
laws of the state and the University
are comparatively few, but such write
ups as THE TIMES has given us would
lead an outsider to believe that this
is the most immoral place in the coun-

NEW ERA IN RELATION BETWEEN
STUDENTS AND OFFICIALS
PROMISED
BURSLEY APPOINTED
DEAN OF STUDENTS
Will Also Be Chairman of Senatej
.Committee on Student
Affairs
A new era in the relation between
students and the University' adminis-
tration is promised in the creation of
the position of dean of students by the
Board of Regents at its last meeting,
and the appointment of Joseph A.
Bursley, professor of mechanical en-
gineering, to assume that position at
once.
Connects Officials and Students
Dean Bursley will be the represen-
tative and spokesman of President
Marion L. Burton in all problems con-
nected with students and their activi-
ties. His position is intended to furn-
ish a connection between University
officials and students which it is im-
possible for the President or the deans
of the various departments to main-
tain with the constantly increasing
enrollment of the University.
Disciplinary measures will remain
in the hands of the various faculties,
according to Dean Bursley. It will be
his duty to investigate breaches of
discipline and to confer with the
deans of all the departments with a
view to securing uniformity of pun-,
ishment throughout the University for
the same offenses.
Will Be Advisor
"I hope that matters of discipline
will not be the principal part of my
duties," said Dean Bursley yesterday
in discussing his work. "I want to
keep the students from getting into
trouble, rather than to spend my time
getting them out of trouble. I want the
students to understand that they are
perfectly free to come to me at any
time for advice or assistance in any
difficulties with which they may be
confronted. In general, problems re-
lating to scholarship will still be in
the hands of the other deans."
He will also be chairman of the
University Senate committee on stu-
dent affairs and chairman of the board
in control of student publications.
Dean Bursley plans to give some work
in the department of mechanical en-
gineering, and he will retain his pro-
fessorial rank in that department.
Dean Bursley will move from his

NORMAL, SANE STANDARD 01
DUCT MUST BE MAIN-
TAINED
TWO EXTREMES SHO
BE AVOIDED--BUR'

Creation
lant;

,
1

of Dean of Students
Step in Bringing Bet
Understanding

Stringent blue laws and petty
lations for student conduct ar
to have a place on the Michigan
pus. There will be no curfew to
students home early every nigh
any other drastic measures. I
justice to the large proportion c
students there must be maintal
normal, sane standard of condui
Such is the policy of the Unih
administration with regard to
plinary measures for students a
lined yesterday by President M\
L. Burton. He has unlimited
dence in the good sense of the
majority of students and in the
tention to insist on normal stan
of conduct. He believes it is
for this large majority to have
judged by the indiscretions of th
In the opinon of President B
there are two extremes in the
lation of conduct, either of which
be avoided. One is the extreme p:
ed by the fanatic who advocat
lentless blue laws and wants "to
the sun out of Sunday." The oth
treme is that of license. It is th
pose. of the University authorit
maintain a course of moderati(
tween these two extremities.
During the time President I
was head of the University of M
sota, he found the dean of sti
was of the greatest important
bringing about mutual understa
between the student body and th
authority.
CHIMES WILL BE
SOLD ON CAM
What the campus thinks
Michigan's methods of teaching
present policy of administration
outstanding topic of the Februl
sue of Chimes, which goes on
this morning. For the first tim
year Chimes will be sold on the
pus. Stands are located at both
of the diagonal and in front c
Library.

"A Brief Slant at the Lit Sc

present office in the Engineering a novel cover in the form of a n
building to the quarters in University photograph of University hall, a
hall formerly occupied by Dean full page cartoon taking a hum(
John R. Effinger, of the literary de- whack at the student affairs com
partment, as soon as repairs now be- tee are a few of the features o
ing made are completed. issue.
fr. V. C. Vaughan, Jiedical Schoo
Dean For P.ast 34Year., Resig
Announcement of the resignation of school from 1856 to 1865. Two
Dean Victor C. Vaughan, for 45 years later, he entered Central co
connected with the Medical school of where he remained for two v
the University of Michigan and for the Leaving there he entered Mt. P
past 36 its dean, was made recently. ant college, where he studied
The resignation, which it is under 1868 to 1872, and from 1874 to
stood has been in the hands of Pres- he attended the University of M
ident Marion L. Burton for some time, gan.
is to take effect June 30. He received an M.S. here in
During the years that Dean Vaughan a Ph.D. in 1876, and an M.D. in
has been connected wit! the Medical In 1877, August, 20, he married
school great strides have been made Dora C. Taylor. Receiving an ins
by that department until today it torship in 1876, he became an assi
ranks well up with the other medical' professor in 1883, and a profess
institutions of the country. Deep re- 1885. He was chosen dean of the
gret is expressed by members of the ical school in 1885.
faculty at the loss of so able an ad- He served in the Spanish-Ame
ministrator. ; war as major, and in the World

Dr. Vaughan attended a private1

(Continued on Page I

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