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February 06, 1921 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-06

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SECTION

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND I1 IHT 11I.RE
SERVICE

ONE

I

VOL. XXXI. No. 94. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1921. PRICE FIVE CEN

REOLUTIONARY
FORCES DOT ALL
IRELANDCLAlM
OFFICER TELLS OF OPERATION
OF ORGANIZED
TROOPS
SAYS ARMY IS GETTING
STRONGER DAY BY DAY
Companies Contain 100 Men; Each
Provides O1ii Equipment; None
Receive Pay
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Feb. 5.-A high officer of
the Irish Republican army has given
to the Associated Press a lengthy
statement on the army and its opera-
tions. This is the first authorized
statement made public, but the iden-
tity of the officer and the circum-
stances of the interview cannot be
disclosed.
The officer, designated in the inter-
view as "Col. X," denied the recent
declaration of Major General Strick-
land, in command of the British
troops, that the Irish Republican army
organization was dismembered, and
repudiated the suggestion that the
remarkable activity in the- last fort-
night was a demonstration to dis-
prove the assertion that the morale
of the volunteers was impaired.
"The recent increase in the num-
her of attacks on the crown forces,"
said Col. X, "was only a natural de-
velopment due to the perfecting of
our organization. From now on there
will be further extension and intensi-
fication of our operations in all parts
of the country.
"The Irish Republican army does
the entire country," Col X said; "our
plan is to account for every district
either by battalions or companies;
every foot of ground is being surveyed
and stujdied with reference to the
most promising spot for ambushes
and with regard to the disposition
of the Crown forces.
"We are slowly but steadily carrying
out our plans. It should be under-
stood, however, that we must organ-
ize and train men for the work while
we are engaged in fighting." The unit
of organization, according to the of-
ficer, is the company whose full
strength normally is 100 men, each
man being practically self contaned
and each company furnishing its own
signalers, engineers , and machine
guns..
Col. X asserted that the organization
was growing rapidly and that it was
easy to obtain recruits. No pay is
given to any of the members of the
organization except instructors. Mar-
tial law has thus far not affected the
operations of the Republican army,
said Colonel X.
S.C.A. CONSTITUTION
W I L L BE AMENDED
Members of the Students' Christian
association will meet at 5 o'clock Feb.
24, in Lane hall, for the purpose of
making amendments to the constitu-
tion of the association, according to an
official announcement by C. Stewart
Baxter, '21, president for men stu-
dents, and Lois B. DeVries, '21, presi-
dent for women students.
The membership of the association
includes all students who are members
of Christian organizations and the wo-

men students who have signed the Y.
W. C. A. membership basis. The
amendments to be considered at the
meeting are as follows:
Article 3, Trustees.-Add to the first
paragraph "the women members rep-
resenting as many different denomin-
ations as possible." Strike out "to-
gether with their fellow members of
the existing advisory committee."
Also to consider the following
amendments of the by-laws which are
intended to clarify their meaning:
Also in the sentence concerning the
Student volunteers, strike out the
words "chairman of the;" "ex-officio a
(Continued on Page Fight)

PRESS CONGRESS TO MEET
Itawailans Arrange Entertainment for
Journalists in Honolulu, Oct. 4
Columbia, Mo., Feb. 5.-Extensive
preparations are being made by Haw-
aiian journalists for the entertain-
ment of delegates to the 1921 meeting
of the Press Congress of the World,
which will be held in Honolulu, Oct. 4,
to 14, according to cable advices re-
ceived by Dean Walter Williams, of
the School of Journalism of the Uni-
versity of Missouri, president of the
congress.
Fifty editors of the Hawaiian Islands
will meet today to appoint a sub-com-
mittee to arrange accommodations for,
the delegates, the latest cablegram
said. Island editors are taking a live-
ly interest in the arrangements, it
was reported.
A program of vital importance and
interest to all newspapermen and wo-
men is being drafted, the congress+
program committee announced. Many
journalists of North America have no-
tified the executive committee, through
President Williams, of their intention
to attend the session next fall.
FORSYTHE PLANS N EW
HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM'
WILL LIMIT TIME OF PHYSICAL
EXAMS AND BEGIN HEALTH
COURSES
Several radical changes in the pol-
icy of the University Health service
were brought out in an announce-
ment of future plans made by Dr. W.'
E. Forsythe, director of the depart-
ment.
Reducing the period of freshman'
examinations to registration week in-
stead of prolonging them for the first
few months of the fall term is one of
the proposed schemes, which it is ex-'
pected will greatly increase the effi-
ciency of the work. This will prevent
the interruption of classes which has
been prevalent in past years.
Seventy-five freshmen have not as
yet taken their examination for this
year, which indicates the necessity of
a departure from the present system.
With examinations coming at the be-
ginning of the semester many incip-
ient diseases would be noticed and
reported to the student, giving him a
chance to prevent them. It is said
that a' half dozen students have had
nervous breakdowns during the pres-
ent semester.
Physical examinations for upper
classmen, another feature of the fu-
ture plans, will begin next semester
for Sophomores if the proposed plans
are accepted.
According to Dr. Forsythe, an im-
portant addition to the service is a
compulsory two-hour course in health
instruction for all freshmen. He states
that the University is lagging behind
in this work, as most of the leading
universities have some such course.
RICH CHILDREN UNDERFED
Detroit Doctor States Wealthy More
Undernourished Than Poor
Detroit, Feb. 5. - "Children from
wealthy families in Detroit are more
seriously undernourished than those
in the slums because the rich child
rises at the last moment, bolts his
breakfast five minutes before schools
opens and is driven to the school door

in a limousine without obtaining any
exercise," said Dr. Henry F. Vaughan,
Detroit's health commissioner. Dr.
Vaughan made the statement follow-
ing a survey of the city's schools by
department of health operatives, who
revealed that thousands of school
children here were undernourished,
due largely to neglect and ignorance
on the part of parents,
"The boy from a poor family has the
advantage over the one from the boule-
vard because he usually goes to bed
early at night, rtses early, eats a good
breakfast and by way of exercise
scuffles with some other boy in the
block on his way to school. An appet-
ite for breakfast must be cultivated by
some exertion," Dr. Vaughan said.
As a result of the survey and the
conditions it revealed the health de-
. partment has begun an educational
campaign among parents of school
children through women's clubs, par-
ent-teachers associations, and other
organizations.

PENROSE FVOBS
Senator Tells American Legion Men
He Would Approve Necessary
Legislation
EXPRESSES DOUBT THAT BILL
WILL BE PASSED THIS SESSION
(By Associate Press)
Washington, Feb. 5.-An American
legion delegation was told today by
Senator Penrose, of Pennsylvania, sen-
ate finance committee chairman, that
he would favor increases in federal
taxation if necessary to provide for
the proposed cash bonus for war vet-
erans. He expressed doubt, however,
whether the legislation could be put
through during the present session of
congress.
Senator Penrose and Senator Mc-
Cumber of North Dakota, were inter-
viewed by American legion rep-
resentatives. The executive commit-
tee of the legion will meet here Mon-,
day to discuss the situation.
The opinon that the people "favor
adequate provision for soldiers, their
widows and relatives," was expressed
by Senator Penrose to the legion rep-1
resentatives.
"I further told the committee," said
Senator Penrose, "that the country
was in a very bad financial situation
and hardly able to meet its require-
ments in that revenue undoubtedly
would fall off to a very marked de-
gree in the next fiscal year. At the
same time I conceded it was the duty
of the government to provide the rev-
enue for this patriotic purpose, were
it necessary that an added tax be lev-
ied. I would favor these taxes but it
is obvious this is impossible."
Senator Penrose said he found the
legion postmen "in a reasonable and
patriotic frame of mind."
GIRLS' GLEE CLUB DANCE TO
BE GIVEN FEB. 22 AT ARMORY
The University Girls' Glee club will
festivate from 2 to 5 o'clock on the
afternoon of Washington's birthday,
at the Armory. There will be music
by George Rogers' orchestra and can-
dy for sale by Ada Nutten, '22, and
her staff. Dances will be sold by the
strip, five tickets to a strip, each
strip costing 50 cents. Chaperones
will be Dean Myra B. Jordan, Mrs.
Marion L. Burton, Mrs. A. G. Hall,
Mrs. S. B. Nickels, Miss Helen Bishop,
and Miss Nora Hunt.
SPANISH PLAY CHARACTERS
CHOSEN: DEL TORO TO TALK
"Women Writers of Spanish Ameri-
ca" is the subject of a lecture to be
given by Mr. Julio del Toro of the
Spanish department at 7 o'clock Feb.
24, not Feb. 23, as was previously an-
nounced.
Try-outs for "Zaragueta," the Span-
ish play to be presented by the so-
ciety some time next semester, re-
sulted in the choice of characters for
several parts. Those wishing to com-
pete for any part not yet definitely
held may communicate with Katherine
D. Wilcox. 954-J.
PRESIDENT EXPECTS TO RE-
TURN TO OFFICE NEXT WEEK

President Marion L. Burton expects
to be able to return to his office Mon-
day or Tuesday after being confined
to his home for two weeks with an at-
tack of pharyngitis.
Scarlet Fever Most Prevalent
Scarlet fever is the most prevalent'
disease in Michigan, according to fig-
ures made public for the first four
weeks of the year by the state board
of health,
Physicians reported 1,572 cases of
this disease last month as compared
to 974 cases during the same period
last year. Indications the first week
in February point to a continued high
sickness rate from this disease.
Monday Closes Play Tryouts
Monday from 4 to 6 o'clock will be
the last day for tryouts for "Le Bour-
geois Gentilhomme," the play that
will be presented under the auspices
of the Cercle Francais. Special try-
outs may be made by consultation
with the director, Mr. Jean Cloppet.

French Gift Will Be Presented To
University Washington 's Birthday

WOVERINES TRIM
FARMERS' FIVE BY
SCORE OF 37-24

When the members of the student
body and the University convene in
Hill auditorium on Feb. 22 to celebrate
Washington's birthday, three events
of importance will take place, presen-
tation by an official representative of
the French government of a collection
of trophies of the recent World War,
their acceptance by President Marion
L. Burton, and an address by the
Hon. William G. Sharp, 83L, who was
formerly American ambassador to
France.
The collection which the University
will receive is of peculiar signifi-
cance in that Michigan is fortunate in
being one of the few large institul
tions of learning in this country to
obtain such an offering. Among the
instruments of war which are includ-
ed in this wonderful aggregation of
war gifts are several different types
of machine guns and the famous
French "75's."Helmets, such as were
worn by the soldiers of the Allied and
ARMYIREDCTION
PASEDOVER VETO
House Favors Enlistment Curtailment
as Method of Diminishing
Regular Forces
SENATE EXPECTED TO TAKE
SIMILAR ACTION NEXT WEEK
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 5.-The joint reso-
lution directing the stopping of enlist-
ments until the regular army is reduc-
ed to 175,000 men was passed tonight
by the house over President Wilson's
veto.
The veto was overridden by a vote
of 271 to 16, one member voting pres-
ent. The President's veto message was
not read to the house until six hours
after its formal delivery, but once
read, action was swift.
Representative Mondell, of Wyom-
ing, the Republican leader said the
message presented no argument that
had not already been before the body
and that further discussion was un-
necessary. He asked for an immed-
iate vote.
All of the 16 members voting to sus-
tain the President were Democrats.
Those voting to override the veto in-
cluded 92 Democrats.
Action is expected to be taken on the
veto early next week in the senate
where it was said prospects were fav-
orable for overriding the President.
President Wilson informed the house
that he was unable to see in the con-
dition of the world or the need of the
United States any such change as
would justify reduction of the force
from the 280,000 men agreed upon by
congress last year as a peace time
force.
NOTED VIOLINIST
WILL PLA Y HERE
Sascha Jacobinoff, violinist, will ap-
pear here at 8 o'clock, Tuesday, Feb.
8, in Pattengill auditorium.
This young artist has not been
known long in the field of violin music,
but he has already come to be class-
ed among the great artists. He is
said to play with excellent technique
and with a warmth of tone and pur-
ity of intonation.
The program which he will give is
as follows:
Variations on Theme (La Folia)
.........................Corelli

Concerto in B minor.......Saint Saens
Allegro non troppo, andantino quasi
allegretto, molto moderato e maes-
toso, allegro non troppo
Nocturne ...........Chopin-Wilhelmy
Indian Snake Dance.....Cecil Burleigh
Bird as Prophet .....Schumann-Auer
Hungarian Dance, No. 1.......
......Brahms-Joachim
Andante Cantabile.Tschaikowsky-Auer
From a Canebrake... Samuel Gardiner
Chanson Indoire ... Rimsky-Korsakoff
Gypsy Airs ........Sarasate-Kreisler
At the piano, Franchon Armitage
Program under the direction 01
Catherine A. Bamman, New York.
THE WEATHER
Unsettled and Colder Today, Probably
Light Snow; Moderate to Fresh
Northwest and West Winds.

ALUMNI CABLE GREETINGS
President Marion L. Burton
last evening received the fol-
lowing cable from Manila:
"Michigan alumni in annual
meeting in the Phillipines join
hands across the Pacific with
their President."

Entente armies, will also be includ-
ed in the gift as well as such articles
as breast plates, guns, and numerous
forms of ammunition.
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, who has been appointed chair-
man of the committee in charge of the
acceptance of the gift, announced that
he has been making efforts to bring
as a speaker for the occasion some
prominent French citizen who is wide-
ly known in this country. As yet no
definite announcement of the man se-
lected can be made, but it is proba-
ble that some speaker will be secur-
ed in time for the exercises.
Mr. Sharp, who will deliver the
leading address, is a prominent figure
in diplomatic circles and has done
much to establish the spirit of friend-
ly relationship which exists between
this country and France. After his
graduation from the University Law
school in 1883, Mr. Sharp was active
in politics, acting as a delegate to the
Democratic national convention in
1904, a member of congress for six
years, when he resigned to take up
his position in the diplomatic serv-
ice.
PROFU FRIDAY ASKED T
HELP STATE -FINNCING
BOARD EXPECTS TO WORK OUT
PLAN FOR INCREASING
REVENUE
Prof. David Friday, of the political
economy department, will go to Lan-
sing next Tuesday at the invitation of
Governor Groesbeck to give the state
the benefit of his experience relative
to a method financing itself and han-
dling its funds. The request was made
by the governor at the instance of the
elective state officers who will con-
stitute the state administrative board
following the conference Friday night
in which there was an extended dis-
cussion of a deficit of about $8,000,000
confronting the state.
With the aid of Professor Friday
the board expects to work out a plan
for increasing the revenue received
from the large number of corporations
now doing business in the state. Sec-
retary Deland, State Treasurer Gor-
man and Attorney General Wiley
agree that the present system of tax-
ation puts more of a burden on the
home-owner than it should and that
the owners of so-called intangible
property are escaping their share of
the tax-load.
It is believed that with the aid of
Professor Friday a simple scheme of
operation can be worked out which
will attain this end with no increase
of expense over the present cost of
collection, and which will not work
any injustice upon the business in-
terests of the state.
Clerks are at work getting statis-
tics arranged which will be used by
Professor Friday in his consideration
of the matter.
Women Come Not
Far From Quota
University women came within. a
hundred dollars of making their quota
in the recent Foreign Relief Drive.
r With one solicitor yet to report, the
donations from women students had
reached $2,397.03 Saturday night. O
this amount $1,793.18 was given to

the Chinese fund, $535.60 to the Euro-
pean Children's fund, and $68.25 to
the European Students' fund. There is
not included in these amounts any
portion of the donations from the An
Arbor Red Cross or other public or
ganizations in which women are ac
tive.

VICTORY RESULT OF IMPROVED
TEAM WORK AND GOOD
SHOOTING
REA CAGES 3 BASKETS;
GUARDS GILKEY CLOSE
Karpus Counts 11 Out of 13 Fouls;
Miller Drops in Five Beautiful
Shots from Floor
Michigan's basketball team contin-
ued in its winning streak and by vir-
tue of improved team work and good
basket shooting downed. M. A. C. last
night by the score of 37 to.24. At no
time during the contest did the Var-
sity lose the lead which it gained in
the first few minutes of play by rea-
son of a long shot by Rea and an-
other basket by Miller.
Coach Mather's men showed better
team play and passing than they have
at any time in Waterman gymnasium
this year. It was a smoother run-
ning five than usual and the ability to
hit the basket told in the final re-
sult. Every man on the Michigan
squad played good basketball. It is
hard to pick any outstanding star,
Probably the shooting of Rea for
counters from the middl ot the
floor and his close guarding of Gilkey,
the speedy little Aggie forward, jus-
tify his being considered the star of
the game. Karpus also deserves much
credit for his excellent shooting from
the foul line. The Wolverine captain
shot 11 out of 13 fouls and in addi-
tion scored two baskets from the field.
His 15 points made him the high point
maker of the evening.
Miller's Shots Accurate
Up to the middle of the second half
when he was taken out, Miller, th
other Varsity forward, had rung 5
baskets from the floor. His shots
were gotten off quickly and were ac-
curate. Two of the 5 were beautiful
one hand shots from difficult' angles
at the side. Williams continued to
break up plays that threatened Mich-
igan's basket and Dunne at center
proved a tower of strength under the
cage. Duke came in for two baskets
in the second half.
Heasley High Aggie Scorer
For the Farmers, Heasley at right
forward was the high scorer., This
lanky gentleman ,was responsible for
five field goals with a total of 10
points. Gilkey, the speedy little team
mate to Heasley, was not able to get
going by reason of Rea's close guard-
ing and. he was held to one basket
from the floor. He threw 7 out of 9
chances from the foul line. Foster
at center played a strong game and
came into the scoring column with 3
goals.
Coach Mather used but 6 men for
the entire game. Toward the middle
of the second half, Whitlock was sent
in for Miller and Bob anchored a
nice shot from the side. The combina-
tion which started seemed to work
together better than any which the
coach has put on the floor this year.
The Varsity band played between
halves and Dodds and Mills of the
Boxing club put on three two-minute
rounds of spirited fistic exhibition
during the intermission.
Mich, Position 3. A. C.
Karpus, -c. ..L.F............Gilkey
Miller ........ R.F.......... .Heasley
Dunne ......... C........ ..Foster
Williams .......L.G..........Mattson
Rea ...........R.G........Fessendon
Final score-Michigan 37, M. A. C.
24. Score end of first half-Michigan
19, M. A. C. 13. Field goals-Michi-
gan, Karpus 2, Miller 5, Dunne 2,
Rea 3, Whitlock 1; M. A. C., Gilkey
1, Heasley 5, Foster 3. Free throws-
Karpus 11 in 13. Gilkey 7 in 9. Sub-

stitutions - Michigan, Whitlock for
Miller. M. A. C., Higbie for Mattson,
Gustavson for Higbie, Matson for Fes-
sendon.
f,
R. 0. T. C. NOTICE
25 Students
s are required to complete the en-
rollment in the infantry unit of
n the R.O. T.C. Enroll now in
- room 241, Engineering building.
-

PUBLICATION SUSPENDED
With this issue The Daily sus-
pends publication until Wednev-
day morning, Feb. 23.

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