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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 03, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1a1al&-a 1VLL%.a aaL.aAr N LOaJIAa&.d

/ fiMMl l\,Y

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPERO H THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
>ublished every morning'except Monday during the Univer.
rear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.'
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
the Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
:ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
-ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
fflces: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
'hones: Business,. 960; Editorial, 2414.
omminications not to exceed 3o words, if signed, the Sig-
e not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
tion of the E~ditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily, office.
fned communicatiofxs will receive no consideration. No man-
t will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
%he Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentimepts ex-
d in the communications.
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING.EDITOR...........GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
Editor............................Chesser M. Campbell
Editors-H .Hiccc
T. H. Adam, H. . nhcock
B. P. CampbellJ.W
J. 1. Dakin J EW.Sargent, Jr.
Renaud Sherwood .JA. Bernstein
T Editor..... ...............-------. Bernsein
,als............Lee Woodruff, L. A. Kern, T. Whinery
ant News ..... ....... .. ..E. P. JLovejoy Jr.
.......................Robert Angell
n's Editor..... .................Mary D. Lane
aph ............... .. ....West Gallogly
;ope................................ .... .Jack W. Kelly

ne Wald*
Weber
h Vickery
lark
Reindel
y Monfort
B. Grandy
Oberholtzer
E. Adams
L. Stone

.Assistants
Thomas E. Dewey
Wallace F. Elliott
Leo J. 'lfershdorfer
Hughsto , McBain
Frank H. McPike
J.A. Bacon
W. W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
J. W. Hume, Jr.
Byron Darnton

M. A. Klaver
11. R. Mis
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
William H. Riley Jr.
Sara Waller
H. t. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 9860
lSS MANAGER...........LEGRANM) a. GAINES JR.
..................... P
s...............................Robt. 0. Kerr
on..................................F. M. Heath
. .. ...... !i . Priehs
-.............V. F. Hillery
""Assistants
ambrecbt P. H utchinson N. W. Robertson
owe=r F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
Kunstadter Robt. L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
V. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
mel jr. D. S. Watterwortb It. G. Burchell

..
md
rrW

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
e of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
11 news to be printed that night.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1921.
Night Editor-W. H. RILEY, JR.
NEETING THE STUDENTS HALF WAY
While Michigan is casting about for the best plan
bring more student self-government and rule en-
cement, there comes to our notice the procedure
University of Kansas students by which they
re taken a step in the same direction with the
I co-operation of their chancellor.
the Kansas movement, like that at Michigan, had
initiative in the student body. The problems
which it was based were indecent dancing and
tain less important matters such as jazz music
I smoking in the entrances of college buildings.
e questions which any Michigan student self-
rernment system will have to settle will certainly
much broader and more pressing than these. It
doubtful whether we shall ever reach the degree
perfection necessary to cause an uprising against
toddle, shuffling, "jazz",. and smoking - in fact,
s greatly to be hoped that we never shall. But
important fact is that a student movement of
sort, similar to that now afoot at Michigan,
z been provedentirely practicable.
[he chancellor, representative of the Kansas uni-
sity administration, at once replied to the peti-
n by stating that he would make the student rec-
mendations effective at once, adding that "these
ommendations prepare the way for the program
student self-government whereby the student
ly will be called upon to assume a larger share
:he control of student life."
With the same degree of hearty support from the
ministration at Michigan, there can be little
abt that such a scheme will work. It has been
'ved that full faculty supervision without student
operation is a dismal failure, and enforcement
>ossible. Mi-higan students have come to real-
this, and- have taken upon themselves the re-
'nsibility of making and holding to their rules. If
determination is allowed to die, all the oppor-
ities of the present will be lost. We have shown
-selves ready to stand on our own feet and en-
ce the rules. No other method of enforcement
1 ever be as sure as that which the Michigan
dents now offer, ;based on their own convic-
is.
kn excellent system of general and class convo-
ions has been drawn up - an insurance against
sorts of inter-student and faculty-student mis-
erstandings.hWe have, on our own initiative,
,ed for. the honor system; and now we come
h the request that we be permitted a much larger
d -of student self-government and enforce-
Ot; We believe that the administration will see
all this a real advance for the good of Michigan;
I that, when complete plans are presented, they
I meet us half way.
MORE FUNDS FOR ART
be thousand dollar appropriation requested by
Ann Arbor Art association to finance free Uni-
city art exhibits and lectures should receive care-
attention.
kt present, it must be conceded, interest in the
of paintings and sculpture, matters about

which college men and women should have some
understanding at least, is at a low ebb. A few en-
thusiasts have attempted to give these forms of
human achievement the place they should have in a
large cultural center such as Michigan, but the rank
and file of the student body have remained indif-
ferent.
This is partially explained by the fact that a
large share of the University attendance does not
have time to take the courses offered in fine arts
and so never gets on very intimate terms with even
the most superficial phases of art.
Free art lectures assisted by exhibits should do a
great deal to remedy this situation. The attendance
of the Graduate club's talks on subjects of intel-
lectual interest has shown that' Michigan students-
appreciate things really worth while. In comply-
ing with the Art association's request the Regents
will be putting a thousand dollars to good use.-
STILL A MAN'S SCHOOL
Michrgan has now enrolled the largest number
of men -in any College of Literature, Science, and
Ahe Arts in the country. Michigan also leads nu-
merically, the Walters statistics show, in the de-
partments of science and engineering. The fact
that this University has for many years had so
great a percentage of men in the literary school and
so many students engaged in the professional stud-
ies of the sciences and engineering has imparted a
character to our student life and a turn to the stu-
dents' ideas which has been one of the University's
greatest assets.
We still retain among the male student body the
old cult of manliness, the old hatred of the shirker
and the. couch cootie, which for many years was
the trait of American universities everywhere, but
which seems, all too unfortunately, to be losing
ground here and there throughout the country. The
man who comes to Michigan will find it a man's
school, where seriousness, ability, energy, and
courage are the qualities we admire; where the
afternoon tea is not yet, thank God, a masculine
diversion. He will find a thousand opportunities
to employ his talents in campus activities and ath-
letics, with a red-blooded spirit of competition
around him. He will find the literary college no
more an asylum for the leisure class than the pro-
fessional schools; on the contrary, he will discover
a serious attitude toward study as a means of prep
aration for life work - an attitude engendered,
perhaps, by the presence of so many students wh
are directly engaged in learning the sciences and
professions they intend to practice. As a rule, he
will find the Michigan man a gentleman, but a
gentleman who puts first things first and considers
"fussing" only as an avocation.
These characteristics of Michigan manhood are
worth keeping. We find ourselves, from our size,
in a special place 'of leadership. Evry four-year
cycle of Michigan men should resolve not only to
preserve, but to build up the standards of manli-
ness which the University has always upheld.
Tlhe Telescopie
Dear Noah:
Is there any truth to the rumor floating around
Ann Arbor that the icemen are not making a decent
living - in fact are actually losing money?
Curious.
The rumor is abolutely false. We were read-
ing in the Scientific American only the other day
that ice one and one-half inches thick would eas-
ily support a man.
.I
A crowd gathered while they tenderly carried the
injured man into the nearby drug store. None
doubted but that the accident had severely injured
his leg, but all were at a loss to know what to do
to alleviate the man's sufferings until the ambu-
lance arrived.
II

Suddenly a young interne from the University
hospital elbowed his way through the crowd. The
onlookers fell back-and watched in silent admira-
tion while he deftly and skillfully administered first
aid to the injured man. Scoffers who had long
scouted the idea that a college cannot really pre-
pare a man for the medical profession were si-
lenced at this exhibition of medical dexterity.
TI'
The injured man, who had been unconscious all
the time, revived just as the young interne was gaz-
ing with justifiable pride at his handiwork. The
victim's eyes shone with admirationandgratitude
as he gazed at the things that had been done for.
him. And then in a faltering voice he whispered
to his savior, "It's all right, doc; the whole thing'is
mighty good except for one little detail." Toler-
antly the interne bent 'down and asked, "Well,
what's wrong with the job ?" "Nothing, nothing at
all, doe, except that youve fixed the wrong leg."
Song of the Gargoyle Staff
We've read 5,000 jokes or more,
And yet we might as well confess
That though these other birds get sore
WE LIKE OUR OWN THE BEST.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm all wrapped up in this," said the girl as she
donned a kimona.
NOAH COUNT.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6105 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Lititeds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a.tm. and eery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours-to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12: 10 p.m.

4
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1999

4

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
GRAH A'S

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13
20
27

FEBRUARY
h T W T
1 2 3
7 S 9 10
14 15 16 17
21 22 23 24
28

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Mimeographing

.11

Examination Questions, Outlines

Men: -Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all now trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you fve to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

Both

Ends of the Diagonal. Walk

TUT TLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
A Nice Cozy Place Where
You Enjoy Your Mfeal
One half block South
0 ,."MAJ"

Circulars, etc.

EDWARDS BROS.
State St. Over College Inn.

I

r "

E

* Ready to Serve
AT ANY TIME
Open from 11 am. to 12 p.m.
Pot of hot tea and bowl of rice
PLAIN CHOP SUEY
35 CENTS
CHINESE and AMERICAN Style
Short Orders
Quand Tung Lo'
613 Laberty St E.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources ........$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
.707 North University Ave.

999

TAXI

999

A Dodge Car
and Dodge
Service--
enoughsaid -
TAXI 999

The Blue Front
Cigar Store
4 6
STUDENT OWNED
Corner of State and Packard
r _

i

,

Phone OrdersI
Promptly Filled

Mail Orders
Promptly Filled

df a

EST. 1857
New Silk Dresses

$25

It really seems as if we had more good news
this spring than we could tell. Prices are so much
lower than they have been for a long time, mer-
chandise is so lovely and everything combines to
make this season a particularly happy one for
us as well as for you.
n This is only another bit of good news and we
are very glad to be able to tell you about it.
Think of new silk dresses for $25. Doesn't it
make you think of before the war times, when
$25 was a common price for a dress? And these
are such lovely frocks. Taffetas predominate,
although if you prefer crepe or satin you will
find them here. Navy blue, always popular, Co-
penhagen, brown and the' new shades of gray,
that are proving so good this season are here in
all the newest modes, with their flaring lines,
their full skirts and cunning tight fitting basque
waists. Trimmings are embroidery, more often
than not in the modish eyelet work, beads, ruf-
fles, ribbons and pipings of bright colored silk.
And bright colors are so good, especially when
the dress is otherwise somber. Let us help you
make a selection from these frocks. We are sure
we can please you.

(Second Floor)

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