100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 03, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-02-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TH-

WEATHER

I.

I

CLOUDY; PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY

rh £fr

I~at

ASSCIATED
PRES
PATS AND NIGHIT WIRE
;SE RVICE

f

VOL. XXXI. No. 91AANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1921. PRICE FIVE CENTS

"EUROP E WAR DT
CAN1BE SETTLEDONL
ONLY WITH C GODS"
-PROF. FRIDAY
UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR STATES
TRADE ALONE CAN BALANCE
RELATIONS
BUSINESS OUTLOOK IN
THIS COUNTRY BETTER
Heavy Indemnity Upon Germany
Would Be Economically an
Impossibility
(G E. S.)
It is the belief of Prof. David Fri-
day of the political economy depart-
ment that Europe's war debt must be
paid in goods, and that the sooner
plans are formulated which will ac-
complih this absorption of the war-
loans of the foreign nations the soon-
er will normal conditions return,
thus making foreign trade upon a
large scale again possible.
Debt Must Be Paid in Goods
"All discussions %f Europe's debt
to America," says Professor Friday,
"must bear in mind the fundamental
principle that it must be paid in
goods. There is no other way.The
general public seems to labor under
the mistaken idea that we should en-
deavor to export all we can to the
European countries and receive
money in payment. It is obvious that
to secure the funds with which to
pay these debts the countries con-
cerned mrust earn it in trade. Great
Britain will compete with the United
States in the carrying of the ocean
traffic of the world. Germany will
send over dyestuffs to outsell those
made in this country. France will
send us manufactured goods which
she willtryto sell in competition
with those made in the United States.
In brief, in discussing the debts owed
this country by Europe it should be
borne in mind that the only possible
payment of this debt is in goods. How,
then, can we expect to keep on ex-
porting merchandise to them?
West Indies Grant Impracticable
"The recent proposal of Lord
Rothermere to cede the West Indies
to the United States in payment of
part, at- least, of the -empire's debt to
the Washington government, is hard-
ly feasible. The West Indies are not
of sufficient strategic importance to
make them necessary and not rich
enough in resources to offset the can-
cellation of such a huge obligation.
England can pay the debt in time,
'.(Continued on Page Eight)
Rumor Of Irish
Debate Is Denied
A statement in the Cleveland Plain
Dealer that Prof. Edward R. Turner,
of the history department, condition-
ally accepted a challenge to debate
the Irish question with Miss Mary
MacSwiney, sister of the late Terence
MacSwiney, lord mayor of Cork, has
been emphatically denied by Prof. C.
H. Van Tyne, of the same depart-
ment.
Professor Turner is out of town at
the present time so that no statement
could be obtained from him, but Pro-
fessor Van Tyne declared that he had
a long talk with Professor Turner

last Friday and that there is abso-
lutely no truth in the story. "Pro-
lessor Turner would not be so fool-
ish as to debate with Miss MacSwin-
ey," said Professor Van Tyne.
The challenge was issued by the
Ohio branch of the American Associa-
tion -for Recognition of the Republic
of Ireland. It followed a speech by
Professor Turner at Western Reserve
university in which he took issue with
some statements made by Miss Mac-
Swiney in an address at Keith's thea-
ter in Cleveland.
EXAMINATION NOTICES
The Daily will print What's
Going On notices for the period
of examinations and up to Feb.
24 in the- Saturday and Sunday
issues of the paper. All notices
must be turned in BEFORE 5
o'clock on Friday, Feb. 4.

Responsibility Dual Under Honor
System Of Taking Examinations

That every person who takes a lit-
erary examination under the honor
system automatically subjects himself
to a dual responsibility was decided
at a conference of members of the
senior honor committee with Dean
Effinger's advisory committee yester-
day afternoon.
May Warn Offender
In the first place, each student will
be required, to sign a pledge stating
that he has neither given nor receiv-
ed aid during the course of the ex-
amination. Secondly, it is understood
that anyone who sees cheating going
on in any form shall report the oc-
currence to some member of the se-
nior honor committee, with the sin-
gle provision that he may warn the
offender orally before the whole class
once. It is expected that in giving
such warning a student will not men-
tion any names but simply say that
MICHIGAN ELEVEN
M B
, f

Football Game with California
Possible If Schedules
Permit

Is

BOTH SCHOOLS HAVE VACANT
DATES; WILL TRY TO AGREE
Michigan may mix with the Uni-
versity of California in football next
fall, as well as track this spring, if
present plans proposed by the Michi-
gan athletic authorities are acceptable
to the Bruin management.
At the time the arrangements re-
garding the track meet were made
with the Western school by P. G.
Bartelme, director of athletics at
Michigan, the possibility of a football
game to fill the vacant date on the
Wolverine schedule, Nov. 5, were dis-
cussed. The.University of California
has already filled this date, playing
the University of Southern California
at Berkeley, and has only Oct. 22 to
offer. As Michigan could not getc
out of a Conference game on. that
date without forcing all of the Big
Ten teams to shift, the California au-
thorities were asked if the Bruinx
game could be postponed or playedE
earlier. If this arrangement can 'be
effected Michigan will be host to thet
California team next fall.c
NORWORTH SOLE STA
IN "MY. LADYFRIENDS"1
........ t
FARCE, AMUSING IN PARTS, NOTE
EXCEPTIONAL IN STAGE
VALUE.
(By "Ha!")a
There are two startling thingsc
about "My Lady Friends" which open-c
ed a two-night engagement at theq
Whitney theater last night. The firsts
of these is Jack Norworth, and ther
second that it is Jack Norworth with-c
out the girls and songs which havec
been so much a part of him for the i
many years during which he has en-
joyed fame as a musical comedy star.
As for the show itself, "My Ladye
Friends" is not an especially amus-
ing farce. The plot revolves aboutt
the troubles of a perfectly "good"s
married man who has the misfortuneE
to enjoy spending his money, whilet
possessed of a wife to whom spending
is abhorrent. So, to gratify his de-c
sire, the gentleman attempts to spread
a little sunshine through the worldx
and keeps three dear little things inl
clothes, cars, and apartments. Ast
you may imagine, complications arise,,
but perhaps you won't imagine all of t
them, and it is for a few of the un-
usual turns which are given to thet
plot that one may enjoy it.t
Jack Norworth, as might have been
expected, was the whole show. Play-
ing the role of James Smith, a
wealthy publisher of bibles, blessed

he is aware that cheating is going on
and that if it floes not cease he will
be forced to turn in the name of the
offender.
The members of junior and sopho-
more classes who agree to take an
examination under the honor system
in the coming finals thereby place
themselves under the jurisdiction of
the senior honor committee inasmuch
as the trial is being made by the
seniors in small classies ain w hich
there are a majority of seniors.
Committee to Consider Cases
The senior honor committee will
consider all cases of cheating that are
reported to it and will make recom-
mendation to Dean Effinger's advisory
committee concerning the punishment
of the offenders.
Any person who is cognizant of
cheating in an examination under the
honor system must give the names
of the guilty ones to one of the com-
mittee whose membership iscas fol-
lows: Lois DeVries, 21, Alice Hink-
son, '21, Bernice Nickels, '21, R. C.
Angell, '21, Lawrence Butler, '21,
Stewart Baxter, '21, George Duffield,
'21, H. W. Johnstone, '21, R. W.
Kneebone, '21, and Donald Porter,
'21. There will be a meeting of this
committee at 5 o'clock Friday in room
306 of the Union.
Members of the faculty giving ex-
aminations under -the honor system
reserve the right to seat the classes
before the examination.
"PENAL METHODS'
NOUT EFFECTIVE
- KIRCHWEY
Criminologist Claims Crime Wave Not
Reduced by Excessive
Punishment
ASSERTS BIG FACTORS ARE
PREVENTION AND REDEMPTION
"Crime is one of the worst diseases
of the present day and yet the meth-
ods employed to combat crime may be
likened to the methods used by the
medical profession in combating dis-
ease more than a hundred years ago."
Such was the assertion made by Dr.
G. W. Kirchwey, ex-warden of Sing
Sing prison of New York and for-
criminals instead of turning them out
school, in addresses made yesterday
to undergraduates of the sociology and
law departments.
Ie called attention to the fact that
the present penal methods depend on
elements of rage, indignation, and re-
venge and that these methods are
supposedly meant to bring out the
better characteristics in the criminal
and make him a better citizen.
"Law, in dealing with the massrof
diseases which we call crime, pro-
ceeds on certain assumptions which
are indeed obsolete," he said, "and in
so doing tends to destroy any self
respect which ever existed in the
criminalsinstead of turning them out
of our prisons better men and
women."
Wants Scientific Study of Crim'e
Dr. Kirchwey discussed the juvenile
courts as they function in the vari-
ous cities of the country and cited
them as examples of the progressive
steps now being made towards a sci-
entific study of crime and its preven-
tion.
"Most of us are apt to think of a
crime wave as an unprecedented oc-
currence. Contrary to this idea, it is

but a steady stream which has mere-
ly forced itself into our view for a
time. Capital punishment does not
diminish crime and many of the dras-
tic punishments now inflicted tend
only to send the wrongdoer back in-
to the world worse than when the law
took him in charge. Our work is
with prevention and redemption and
it is only through these means that
we can reduce crime."

COMMITTEE IN
FAVR HOLDING
3 CONVOCTIONS
STUDENT ASSEMBLIES DURING
BOTH SEMESTERS REC.
OMMENDED
UPPERCLASS COUNCILS
TO CONSIDER PROBLEMS
Project Thought to be Most Effective
Instrument for Furthering
Co-operation
Recommendations for at least three
general convocations of all students,
and for as many meetings of up per-
classmen as are expedient during the
college year, were made yesterday by
the upperciass committee on convo
cations, appointed by LeGrand A.
Gaines, '21E, president of the Student
council, at the meeting of juniors and
seniors Sunday, Jan. 23.
Student opinion on the recommenda-
tions will be solicited by the commit-
tee at the next meeting of upperclass-
men, and if approved, the recommend-
ations will be carried to the President
of the University. 'Members of the
committee are: E. E. Wieman, '21,
chairman; R. E. McKean, '21, Paul
Eaton, '21, D. A. Forbes, '21, F. J.
Petty, '21, F. L. Brewer, '21, and R.
F. Grindley, '21E.
Would Hold Three Meetings
The committee recommends, first,
that there be at least three general
convocations of all students, presided
over by the President of the Univer-
sity, each school year; that one of
these convocations be held during the
first week of the fall semester, one
between Dec. 1 and the Christmas
holidays, and one during the first
month of the second semester.
The committee further 'recommends
that additional general convocations
be encouraged and that they be called
at such times as shall be deemed ad-
visable by the President of the Univer-
sity and the president of the Student
council.
It is also recommended that the pres-
ident of the Student council be author-
ized, and is in this recommendation
asked, to call meetings of the juniors
and seniors on the campus for the
consideration and discussion of stu-
dent problems; that one of these meet-
ings be called during the second week
of each fall semester, and that others
be called throughout the year as con-
ditions, in the judgment of the council,
shall make expedient. Furthermore,
it is recommended that the council be
required to call such a meeting if1
petitioned to do so by 100 upperclass-
men.
The committee believes that these
recommendations, if carried out, will
bring the students closer together, will
help to solve many campus problems,
and will bring about a higher degree
of co-operation between the faulty
and the students of the University.
HENRY, WIFE SLAYER,
GETS LIFE SENTENCE
E. Henry, colored, husband of the
late Mrs. Lulu Henry, who died Satur-
day from blows upon the head

wick a hammer, was sentenced by
Judge Sample in the circuit court
yesterday afternoon to life imprison-
ment.
Henry was found by Deputy Sheriff
Harry Smith, who searched for two
days for him in Detroit. His vigi-
lance was rewarded Tuesday after-
noon when he saw Henry on the cor-
ner of Hastings and Clinton streets.
Henry recognized Smith and ran, fin-
ally disappearing into a store. With
the aid of Warren C. Richardson, a
colored detective, Smith captured
Henry in the store.
Henry admitted to Smith and to
Judge Thomas this morning that he
had struck his wife in the head with
a hammer and pleaded guilty to the
charge of first degree murder.
The inquest into the death of Mrs.
Henry was held at 7:30 o'clock last
night in the circuit court room. Dr.
Edwin C. Ganzhorn, coroner, was in
charge of the case, assisted by Cor-
oner Samuel Burchfield.

BOARD OF REGENTS
POSTPONE MEETING
The February meeting of the Board
of Regents, originally scheduled for,
Friday of this week, has been post-
poned until Friday, Feb. 11, on ac-
count of the illness of President Mar-
ion L. Burton.
He is recovering slowly from the
attack of pharyngitis with which lie
has been confined to his home for
more . than a week. His condition
has remained about the same for sev-
eral days, but there have been no
complications of any kind. President
Burton will not be able to return to
his office before Monday.

FIGUIRES USED REPRESENT MEN
ON CAMPUS AT ONE
TIME
CALIFORNIA LARGEST;
COLUMBIA RANKS NEXT

Two speaking engagements which Walters' Counted Total of Summer
he had made for next week have been Session and Part Time
cancelled, one before the Pennsylva-
nia Retail Lumber Dealers' associa- Students
tion in Pittsburgh on Thursday, and
the other before the Teachers' asso- Commeiting upon the enrollment
ciation of Rochester, N. Y., on Friday. figures given out by Raymond Walt-
ers, of Lehigh university, and publish-

r

RUM WAREHOUSES
ORDERED C LOSED~
Officials Act to Stop All Illegal Liquor
Sales in United States and t
Territories
WHISKEY PERMITS NOT TO BE 1
HONORED BY DISTILLERIES'
(By Associated Press) t
Washington, Feb. 2.-Scores of dis-
tilleries and bonded warehouses int
every state in the union, Hawaii andt
Porto Rico were ordered indefinitely
closed against liquor withdrawals by
Prohibition Agent Kramer. At the
same time wholesale liquor dealers
were ruled out of further participation
in the sale of the confiscated beverages4
by Attorney General Palmer.
Commissioner Kramer's drastic or-
der stopping the flow bf liquor from,
storage and the attorney general's in-t
terpretation of the Volstead act, pro-t
bgbition officials said meant the elim-
ination of the wholesale liquor sale'
made possible the preventing of boot-
legging through forged permits and il-
legl disposal of intoxicants.1
Stoppage of liquor withdrawals all'
over the country and in two of the
territories was an extension of the
order issued last week putting a banf
on removal in New York, Pennsylva-'
nia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Connec-
ticut, Rhode Island, and New Jersey.t
The order does not apply to withdraw-
als of industrial alcohol or reasonable
quantities of sacramental wines and
makes an exception in the case of re-j
tail druggists who are permitted to{
make withdrawals up to five cases off
liquor at a time.f
Warning against attempts to obtain
whiskey despite the nation wide ban
was sent out by Commissioner Kramer
who directed all owners of distilleries
and warehouses not to honor permits;
for whiskey withdrawals "purporting1
to be issued by any state director, ir-
respective of the state unless such,
permit-is issued or approved by the1
director."
COMEDY CLUB GIVES ONE ACT
PLAY, "WHERE, BUT IN AMERICA"
"Where, But in America," a one act
playlet, was presented by several
members of the Comedy club at the
regular monthly meeting of the or-'
ganization Tuesday night in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. Caroline Na-
pier, '22, Elizabeth Vickery, '22, and
Frank Andrews, '21A, assumed the
principal roles of the play.
Election of Andrews to the office
of business manager to replace Jo-
seph Avery, who is leaving the Uni-
versity at the end of this semester,
and Donald Thorp, '21, as treasurer,
took place at the business meeting of
the club. Plans for the production
of the annual play, which this year
is "Bunty Pulls the String" and
which will be held at the Whitney
theater March 9, were discussed.
Wisconsin Senate Wants Disarmament
Madison, Wis., Feb. 2.-The state
senate voted to urge congress to take
the initiative 'for world disarmament
and withdraw immediately all Amer-
ican troops from European and Asiatic
countries, including possessions.

ed in yesterday's Daily, Dean E. H.
Kraus said: "The figures given were
for the entire year, including both
summer session and part time - stu-
dents. If the various institutions of
the country were compared on' the
basis of registration as for Nov. 1,
consisting of all students enrolled at
that time, the University of Michigan
would be third in order, California
and Columbia taking first and second
places, respectively.
"California, as shown by Mr. Walt-
ers' figures," said Dean Kraus, "has
11,071 regular student enrollment.
Columbia university is next with an
enrollment of 8,488, having had at that
time only 30 more regular students
than this University. Therefore the
Universities of Michigan and Colum-
bia are practically tied. Illinois un-
iversity is fourth with a regular stu-
dent enrollment of 8,250. Undoubtedly
California's lead should be reduced
considerably because students count-
ed twice have not been deducted."
Other Large Summer Schools
Acording to Registrar Arthur' G.
Hall the comparison made by Mr.
Walters is a difficult one since it .con-
tains both summer session and part
time students and the Universities of
California, Columbia, New York, Chi-
cago, and Pennsylvania have large en-
rollments of this character,
"The University of California," said
Registrar Hall, "has as large a sum-
mer session enrollment, as Columbia
university. The latter has a large ea-s
rollment in the teachers' college, also.
A large proportion of students enroll-
ed in New York university attend the
college of commerce which is situated
in the downtown section of New York
City. This condition is prevalent also
in the University of Pennsylvania.
Largest Number on Campus
"Oux enrollment will be materially
increased," said Registrar Hall, "when
our second semester students are add-
ed. Some institutions have larger sec-
ond semester enrollments than others.
The enrollment figures as give by
Mr. Walters were based on .the pre-
liminary enrollment of Nov. 1. In any
event, we have a larger number of
students on the campus at any one-
time than any other institution in the
United States. It is a unique fact, too,
that 95 per cent of the students of
the University of Michigan live within
a one mile radius of the campus."
Cloppet"Talks On
Anabole France ,
Jean B. Cloppet, director of the Cer-
cle Francais, in a lecture on Anatole
France delivered before that body at
4:15 o'clock yesterday afternoon in
Tappan hall, explained the character-
istics and philosophy of the famous
novelist and critic by reference to his
works.
Mr. Cloppet stated that "Le Livre de
mon Ami," is Anatole France's best
book because it brings out to the
fullest the irony, imagination, an
cynicism which distinguishes all of his
works. "He writes in a clear style,
and is a great literary artist," said
Mr. Cloppet.
R. '0.T. C. NOTICE
39 Students .
are required to complete the en-
rollment in the infantry unit of
the R.O. T. C. Enroll now in
room 241, Engineering building.

AUTHORITIES SAY
MICHIGAN THIRD

I

N ENROLLMEN

with a wife, economical almost to the
point of 'niggardliness, Norworth ac- Willard-Dempsey Bout Called Off
quitted himself in his usual pleasing New York, Feb. 2.-Tex Rickard
(Continued on page Eight) boxing promoter, tonight announced
that the Dempsey-Willard fight which
Senior Lits Can Pay Dues Now Dempsey announced in Los Angeles,
' Senior lit dues are payable by check Calif., today, was off, had been post-
to John E. McManis,- 1351 Washtenaw ' poned with the consent of both par-
avenue. ticipants, until Labor day.
r

i .

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan