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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 30, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-30

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THE.

C r"I'Ai

I -L.4I,.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN '
Published ever" morning except Monday during the Univer-
ty year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF.THE ASSOcIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
edited in this paper and the local news published therein.
FEntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ess matter.'
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann ArborPress building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ature not necssarily to appear in print, but .as an evidence of
ith, and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
iscretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
Jnigned communications will receive%no consideration. No man-
script will be returned unless the writerincluses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
essed in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
n the evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
ANAGING EDITOR ........-...GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR.
ews Xditor...........................Chesser M. Campbell
ight Editors-H.WHihcc
T. H.Adams .E. canis ck
B. P. Campbell J. . MSagntsr
J. I. DakinrT. W. Sargent; Jr.
Renaud Sherwood
ndayEditor................ .. A. Bernstein
ditorsls......... ..L 7ee Woodruff,L. A. Kern, T. 3. WhinerY
sistant News ............. .......... .... "".E. P. Lovejoy Jr.
orts..e................ ....-.-- ....Robert Angell
oen' s' Editor....,. ..................-.Mary D. ane
elegraph............................... " ..West rGallogly
lescopeh..................................Jack W. Kelly
Assistants
,sephine Waldo Thomas E. Dewey Mv. A. Klaver
al G. Weber Wallace F. Elliott E. R. Meiss
Uzabeth Vickery Leo J. Hershdorfer Walter Donnelly
It. EClark Hughston M eBain Beata Hasley
orge Reindel Frank H. McPike Kathrine Montgomery
orothy Monfort, 7.-A. Bacon trald P. Overton
arry B.{Grundy W. W. Ottaway Edward Lambrecht
,ances Oberhloltzer Paul Watzel William H. Riley Jr.
>bert F,. Adams J.BW. Hume,Jr. Sara Wailer
orge L. Stone Byron Darnton H. E. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
[NESS MANAGER .........LEGRAND A. GAINES JR.
rtising..................................D. P. Joyce
fieds..................................Robt. O. Kerr
cation..........---.... ...............F. M. Heath
ints ........1...................--.-.. R. Priebs
ation .......................-- - ....V. F. Hilery
Assistants
. Lambreclt . P. H Hutchinson N. W. Robertson
*Gower' F. A. Cross R. C. Stearnes
ud Kunstadter Robt.- L. Davis Thos. L. Rice
r W. Millard M. M. Moule D. G. Slawson
Hamel Jr. D. S. Watterworth R. G. Burchel

The present system for the control of student
life has the inherent weakness of being compul-
sory instead of voluntary in its action. It has been
found to encourage antagonism to rules rather than
respect. It makes violation of rules a game, with
a tendency to shield offenders. "Schoolmaster"
methods of enforcement on the one hand and scof-
fing at by-laws on the other a're equally out of place
in a big university, but they are the logical results
of a system of government in which stdents have
almost no voice.
With student regulation, the faculty will be re-
liesved of a part of their police duties and students
%will themselves apprehend and punish campus of-
fenders. Such a plan embodies what seems on its
face, at least, to be a very satisfactory solution of
Michigan's difficulties.
Where faculty authority will leave off and stu-
dent authority will begin is of course one of the
most difficult problems in the scheme. But it
should be remembered that the succe'ss of the
project can come only through confidence in the
student body and the complete fulfilment of this
trust in everyone on the campus.
KEEP IT UNANIMOUS
The senior class has voted unanimously to adopt
the honor system plan in the coming examinations.
Once the consent of the faculty is obtained, suc-
cess or failure of the proposition will lie wholly
in the hands' of the students.
If the system is workable in the upperclass ex-
ams, it may in future be extended to apply to all
classes. There have been repeated attempts at
Michigan to get away from the prodtored finals.
The present project, calling for the gradual intro-
duction of the honor plan to be tried out first in
the smaller groups of the senior class, presents an
opportunity for a fair trial of the system without
in any way disrupting the work of the University
should the attempt be less satisfactory than its
backers hope for.
Granting the consent of the faculty, the whole
matter rests in the hands of the senior lits. Inas-
much as the plan was passed without dissenting
vote at the last class meeting, every member owes
his class the highest degree of co-operation. Hearty
support will mean success, indifference will result
in failure. It is up to us to succeed.
THE WELCOME TO TRAINED MEN
The Engineering college recently issued a state-
ment in which it proclaimed that practically every
student leaving its portals this year with a diploma.
would be provided with a position. The newly or-
ganized Commerce club has an employment bureau
which is receiving communications from business
firms throughout the country requesting college
gradiates to occupy positions which require uni-
versity training and command a good chance to ad-
vance.
The world is always out with a spyglass for
trained workers, and while ordinary "jobs" which
the average laborer or clerk can fill are all too scarce
in the present depression period, employment col-
umns are constantly offering advertisements for
the unusual man, the man who has special knowl-
edge and is not predisposed against work. As the
old adage ought to read, "Everything comes to him
who goes out after it."
A Grand Rapids minister claims that the wicked
saxophone and the shimmy are making the Indians
wild by reminding them of the tomtom Where, oh
where, is that saxophone boom and shimmy beat?
2The...TIelescpe

Both

Ends of the Diagonal Walk

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e ery two
hours to 9:48 p. mn.
Locals to Detroit-S :55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. n.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

--- - - - - - a,.

Any way you look at it - whether from the
standpoint of purity, therefore safety; or from
the standpoint of food value, of genuine good-

ness; you are justified in ordering

JANUARY
S M T W T

F S
I

In o rps.
11 r
I C : ga E .r[

2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30 31
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear just as
long and saves you live to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.

3

A COMPLETE LINE OF DIARIES
AND DESK CALENDARS
AT
G RAHAM'S

I

.7
U

ALL
SUITS, and OVERCOATS

11

V
11
Sr

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
"te of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
fall news to be printed that night.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1921.
Night Editor-J. E. McMANIS.
WHO'-A HE-FLAPPER? ,
Only a few years ago the best defining Mr.
[ebster could do of the word "flapper" ran about
Ce this: "A thing to flap or clap with; a part that
angs or droops; a flipper; a young game bird, es-
cially a duck, not able to fly well; in a slang
:nse, the hand."
Very good, Noah, but "that ain't the half of it."
here's a new variety of the species, and he needs
fining quick - before that unpleasant - we re-
at it, very unpleasant - name can hit vi again.
r. Perry did it - our good friend, Stewart H.
erry, '94 - with his editorial hatchet, in his well
id widely known Adrian Telegram. Painting
:ichigan's sudden realization of its "state of{
)ma," this editorial goes on to say: "The ordinary
Lriety of flapper is a she - a girl in the stage be-
Veen hay and grass, whose chief thought is to at-
act attention. * * Now a he-flapper is some-
ing as near that as possible, but a he instead of a
e - equally hard to define but equally easy to
cognize. * * * It seems that this element has
en too active. They have given too much atten-
> to society, organizations, entertainments, and
bat-not - everything except books * * * The
op was the joy, pride and glory of the he-flap-
:r - the grand and final set-piece in the whole
-eworks display of student society."
Mr. Perry has been misinformed in supposing
at "this is the way student opinon sizes up th'
se." The hardest workers in organizations and
tertainments and the best mixers in student so-
ty - under Mr. Perry's definition, he-flappers
luxe - are also among the best students here.
hat we want is more, not less, interest in student
fairs and activities as well as studies, coupled
th a greater degree of reading and information
outside matters. The real "he-flapper" is a per-
n lacking in character; and it is not that sort of
rson who is doing the driving in Michigan's or-C
nizations and social life.
President Marion L. Burton - who, by the way.
I not stop the Hop, Mr. Perry - has a clear ap
eciation of the student mind. In his inaugural
dress he said: "The student lives in his own world
reality * * * He seeks an outlet for his in-
ative and his resourcefulness. So he organizes
s student activities and gives them his primary
:erest. * * * Frankly, he regards his univer-
y work as secondary if not tertiary, and finds a
:isfactory outlet for his energy and geniugin ath-
ics, dramatics, journalism, and student govern-
nt."
[t is very well to seek ways of making university
rk primary instead of tertiary, but the fact that
r perfectly sound will and ambition now seeks
Ier outlets is not a justification for lumping the
t and the worst of us under the defilition "he-
>pers". -
THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT PLAN
ks an experiment with big possibilities, the par-
substitution of student self government for
ulty regulation in affairs outside the campus
uld have the combined support of all con-

i
I

331/3% Off

HATS, CAPS, GLOVES
AND ALL FURNISHINGS

-I

.20 Per Cent Oft

U
REST
Home of Sweet and Purity
Always Fresh
302 S. Main Phone 474-W

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TWO COMPLETE STORES

STATE STREET

MAIN STREET

Mary had a little lamb,
Some wine and lobster stew,
And ere the morning sun had dawned
She had a nightmare, too.

Dear Noah:
Is it true that as a general rule large physicians
are more successful than their smaller brethren?
If so, why is this true? L. F. G.
Yes, statistics show that the most-successful doc-
tors have been large men physically. The only rea-
son we can advance for this is that maybe when
the patient is at death's door the larger physician
finds it easier to pull him through.
Since reading that the Union officials
Have decided to abolish the saxaphones
At their dances, we fail to see why
The girls complain that they haven't any
Club of their own,
Because even if they can't enter the Union
By the front door, they must have
Several of their sex on the committee that is
Trying to do things in "Down East" style.
TO LEASH DOGS OF WAR - recent news
headline.
Probably meaning they're going to tie up some
of the ocean greyhounds.
You're probably right, Clarice, when you say that
no man knows a woman like a book until he tries
to put her on the "shelf".
Famous Closing Lines
"Playing bridge," he cried as the fellow threw
himself across the brook in order to let the girl
walk over on him.
NOAH COUNT.

WHITNEY

Feb.

2& 3

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