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January 30, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-01-30

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SECTION
ONE

~r3tr 4 an

4I mill

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I

DAY AND) NIGHT
SER37ICE

lITE I

I

I

I

- --Rmm

VOL. XXXI. No. 88.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1921.

___._
E

WILL FIGHT ANY
SAYBROHEROODS
HEADS OF GREAT UNIONS STATEE
STAND ON PROPOSEDt
PAY CUTS
RAILROADS PREPARE
PLEA FOR LOWER PAY
Executives Confer on Readjustmentt
Program to Be Acted On I
Monday1
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 29. - Heads
of three big railroad brotherhoods in
formal statements here tonight said
the railroad men of the country "will
the railroad men of the country "will
reduction which Chicago dispatches
say the railroads will seek from the
United States railway labor board in
a petition to be presented Monday.
W T.Lee, of the Brotherhood of
Railroad Trainmen, W. F. Caster,
president of the Brotherhood of Loco-
motive Firemen and Enginemen, and7
L. E. Shepphard, president of the Or-
der of Railroad Conductors, made
this declaration in formal statement.
A similar declaration was made
Thursday by Warren S. Stone, grand
chief of the Brotherhood of Locomo-i
tive Enginees.
All the Brotherhood officers de-
plae that report of decreases in the
post of living are not bone out by'
aptual cpnditions but are the result.
of prop g?4d; that the wages of;
railway employes did not increase as
rapidly as did the cost of living or as
muoh; l that railway men ae not
44w r@e eying as high a sta~dard of
Wqges § are paid in mnny other in-
4uskia,
M. Lee assertd that in his opinion
§omge, if not the greater part of the
15sin1ess depression has been brought
about solely for the purpose of preju-
dioing the publip in the interests of
rptuption in wages generally,
Exeputyes Work en Plans
hiago, Jn. 2. - Railroad exe-
'tiyes, after a two day conference be-
hin logsed doors, tonight outlined a
tentative plan of action designed to
make such readjustments as the
rilo ads consider necessary for effi-
Went and economical operations. The
labor committee pf the American As-
sociation of Railway Executives were
still working tonight on a program
involving the association's 172 mem-
ber roads but with prospects of ac-
tion on Monday.
Executives in close touch with the
conference, declared that failure of
the roads to get expected earnings
and the present decline in business
had forced them to take immediate
action.
Saxophones Not
Ilarred tF~rever
An erroneous yiew that the use of
the saxophon has been discontinued
forev at Union 4aces caused Pul
Eston, '11, prsident of the Union, to
poitnent yesterday as follgws:
"go porrct , misuderstanging
ilph gits Tth some people rela-
ig tQ to nn-us o sa pphoes I
the Zphign Uion dnce orchesra,
Wih t state they ae hot barred.

t ither the IJniou nor the Uiyersity
h passed any rule toward that end.
3q wind jnstruments are .t present
Agin ns@4 in the ordhestr? 4inly b@-
pause its personnel ng make.p r
satsfacgry as they new stand. The
joil de ire of the Union Is to give
gQII s, We, ih seems to meet the
AppoYval Rf the majority of dancers."
IONA POLAND IS IMPROVING;
WILL BE QUESTIONED SOON
The condition of Iona Poland, the 15
year old girl found lying in a como-
tose condition on the corner of State
and Williams streets early Sunday,
is gradually improving. She was
resting easily Saturday and there has
been a great improvement in her men-
ta4 'contion.
esslshehas a relapse itis op-
eq that in a day or two it wdL be
Pi as qt t thoeougquns-
t~qgging as to the events responsible ;

FORDNEY TARIFF
BILL AT CRISIS
(By Associated Press)
'Washington, Jan. 29.-The Fordney
emergency tariff bill had reached the
boundary point when the senate ad-
journed tonight until next Monday.
Republican leaders called a confer-
ence late today and agreed next week
to again endeavor to secure an agree-
ment for a ote and, if unsuccessful,
to attempt cloture.
That both plans were virtually cer-
tain of defeat was stated privately by
Republican managers, who said that
In the event of a failure they would
be compelled to lay aside the tariff
measure in favor of other pressing
business.
SELECT MEMBERS
OF DEBATE TEAMS
Affirnative Team to Meet Wisconsin
Here; Negative Goes to
Illinois
MEMBERS CHOSEN AFTER THE
FINAL TRYOUT BEFORE JUDGES
The members of the Mid-Western
Debating team were chosen yesterday
morning after the final tryout in Ma-
son hall, by Prof. T. C. Trueblood,
Prof, 1ay K. Immel, Prof. R. D. Holl-
ister, and Mr. John H. Hathaway, all
of the public speaking department,
acting as Judges,
The 1hembers chosen for the affirm-
ative team are: Earl F. BoxelI, '23L,
R. B. Ritter, '22, Devera Steinberg,
'22, and Henry Hertz, '22, alternative;
for the negative team: John E. Bacon,
'23, R. R. Johnson, '23, E. T. Ramsdell,
'23, and W. A. Hocking, '23, alterna-
tive.
The members of the affirmative team
debate with the Wisconsin trio here
March 18, and the negative team goes
to Urbana to debate with the Illinois
team on the same date. The question
to be debated is "Resolved, That the
government of the United States should
at once officially recognize the Soviet
government of Russia."
Gargoyle Adapts
Mother Goose To
New Conditions
Gargoyles will once more show their
bright and vari-colored covers to the
campus when they go on sale tomorrow
as the January issue.
"A College Child's Garden of Verse,"
is a take off of the Mother Goose
rhymes, having adapted itself to mod-
ern college conditions. Other features
are the customary variegated cartoons
by W. W. Gower, '23, who attempts
to belittle the other Univgrsity publi-
cations. New Year's resolutions are
given for the benefit of those who
have not already got some.
The cover-that's a surprise. Wait
and see what it is.
TAU SIGMA DELTA
INITIATES EIGH'
Tau Sigma Delta, honorary society

of arehiteeture and allied arts, held
its fifth annual initiation banquet
Saturday night in the Union The in-
iaties were: J H. Page, '21A, R. V.
Gay, 121A, H A. beam, '22A, R. H.
Ain worth, 2A, and Juliet A. Ped-
dle, '2A,
eight chapters have been founded
since 1912, when the Alpha chapter
was founded here at the University.
The last two charters granted were to
the University of California and to the
University of Liverpool, England.
Several speakers oif professional
prominence addressed the members
and neophytes. G. D. Mason, of C.,-
Mason and company, architects, who
are constructing the miigio4 dollar
Masonic building in Detroit, wa4 one
of the men on he pgogram. Among
the alu}i i prespt were H. H. Try-
sell, 9f, the firm of Attwood and Try-
sell, Detroit, and D. I. Williams Jy
vice-president of G. D. Mason ald
compeat.

G6ERMAN INDEMNITY
FINALLY AGRIEDONi

Supreme Allied Council Agrees
Sum to be Paid as War

on

Reparation
42 ANNUITIES WILL TOTAL
226 BILLION GOLD MARKS
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 29.-Full agreement on
reparation, German disarmament and
all other important questions before it
was reached by the Supreme council
of the Allies when it adjourned at
5:40 o'clock this evening to meet again
in London, Feb. 21.
The great result obtained, as M.
3riand, the French premier expressed
it after the closing session was, "main-
tenance by the Allies of a front as
united in making peace as it was in
waging war.' Count Sforva, the Ital-
ian foreign minister, and M. Briand
said the conference had resulted to the
satisfaction of everybody concerned.
A protocol was signed approving the
,reparation scheme as agreed by the
special committee appointed by the
council to consider the subject and'
also the report of the disarmament of'
Germany as presented by the military
committee. Under this agrement Ger-
many must disarm by July 1, disband-'
ing all her civic guards not provided
for in the Versailles treaty.
Germany will be 'called upon to pay
42 annuities on a sliding scale of 226,-
000,000,000 gold marks. Her exports
will in addition bear an export duty
of 12 per cent that will go to the Al-
lies on the basis of last year's exports,1
this would give the Allies 1,250,000,000
gold marks or 12 per cent of whatever
moneyinswhich the exports are paid
for. Thus it is estimated 'the first
payment made by Germany will be
3,250,000,000 gold marks, the export'
tax being paid entirely in cash.
TO CONSIDER MICKELSON
STAR MEASURING PLAN
PROF. HUSSEY AND DR. SAWYER
TO GIVE TALKS BEFORE
DISCUSSION
The physics department will hold
a special open discussion at 4:20 Mon-
day afternoon in the east lecture room
of the Physics building, to give both
the physical and astronomical view-
point of the recently developed Mick-
elson method of measuring stellar
diameters.
This process, which gives the actual
diameter of any star within range of
astronomical instruments has caused
considerable interest in scientific cir-
cles and the public at large, accord-
ing to Prof. H. N.. -andall, head of the
physics department'
Dr. A. A. Nickelson, who developed
the methbd, is head of the physics de-
partment at the University of Chicago,
and is the recipient of the Nobel prize,
which is given every few years to the
man making the most important ad-
vancement in the realm of science.
The idea depends on the interference
of two beams of light. Dr. Micelson
has been using the same principle in
determining the legth of the standard
meter, kept in Paris, in terms of wave
lengths of light. It is believed that
the length of metal changes in the
course of time and that the length of
light beams does not. Dr. Mickelson
has also been making investigation
into the distortion of the earth by the
tides, by this same process.
Prof. W. J. Hussey, of the astronomy
department, will open the discussion
by presenting the astronomical side
of the possibilities foreseen in this
method. Dr. R. A. Sawyer, formerly

with the physics department at the
* University of Chicago, will describe
the principle itself in non-technical
terms.
Princeton ges lulteo $Q
Princeton, . 4., Jan. 29.-Princeton
university will be forced to raise its
tuition from $250 to $300 a year in
September, President John E. Hibben
announced today. This will not affect
needy studentk.
A membex of. the board of trustees
said tonight that a survey had shown
that it nw cost Princeton $500 an-
aually to educate each student.

VETERANS SHOWN
PICTURES OF A. E. F.
Membersb of theRichard N. Hall
post, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and
their friends were entertained at Lane
hall yesterday afternon with official
United States war pictures of the
signal coarps of the A. E. F. The
pictures, selected as the best secured,
were taken at practically all points
where the Americans operated.
During the afternoon Almond Fair-
field, '21, gave several vocal numbers
and G. E. Coates, '23, entertained with
his whistling. Hamilton Cochran, '22,
presided.
HIGWYLEADERS
PLAN CONFERENCE
Will Meet in Ann Arbor on Feb. 23;
Prominent Speakers Scheduled
on Program
W. C. REDFIELD TO DISCUSS
TRINITY OF TRANSPORTATION
Speakers of national importance, in-
cluding President Marion L. Burton,
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, of the en-
ginering college, the United States
commissioner of education, and the
chief of the United States Bureau of
Public Roads, will address a Mid-
western conference on highway and
highway transport education, to be
held in Ann Arbor on Wednesday,
Feb. 23. The conference will be un-'
der the auspices of the permanent
committee on highway and highway
transport education of the University
of Michigan, and the Michigan state
highwaysdepartment. The program
will be as follows:
Dr. Claxton Will Preside
Morning session, 10 o'clock, audi-
torium university hall, Dr. P. P. Clax-
ton, United States commissioner of
education, presiding; "The Highway
and Social and Economic Welfare," by
Dr. Claxton, chairman of the per-
manent committee; "The Educational
Activities of the Permanent Commit-
tee," by Prof. C. J. Tilden, director
of the permanent committee; "The
Economics of Highway Transport,"
by Roy D. Chapin, vice-president na-
tional automobile chamber of com-
merce; "Highway and Highway
Transport Education in Secondary
Schools," by Harriet E. Beard, super-
visor of safety education, Detroit pub-
lic schools.
Engineers to Speak
Afternoon session, 2 o'clock, audi-
torium University hall, Dr. Claxton
presiding: "The Measure of Highway
Accomplishment," by Thomas H. Mac-
Donald, chief United States bureau of
public roads; "The Army's Highway
Transport Problem," by Col. Mason
M. Patrick, corps of engineers, United
States Army; "The Inter-relationship
of Waterway, Railway, and Highway
Transport," by Prof. Henry E. Riggs,
professor of civil engineering, Uni-
versity of Michigan; "Snow Removal
from Transport Routes," by Charles
J. Bennett, state highway commis-
sioner of Connecticut; "The Economic
Value of Highway Transport Sur-
veys," by Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard,
department of highway engineering
and highway transport, University of
Michigan.
Banquet in Union
Banquet in the assembly hall of
the Michigan Union, 6 o'clock. 'Dr.
Mortimer E. Cooley, president, socie-
ty for the promotion of engineering

education, presiding. After dinner ad-
dresses: "Highway Transport and the
Industry," by Tom Snyder, secretary,
Indiana Highway Transport and Ter-
minal association; "Inter-relationship
of Highway Transport and the Back-
(Continued on Page Six)
PRESIDENT BURTON REPORTED
TO BE IMPROVING RALIDLY
President Marion L, Murton was re-
ported yesterday aternoon to be re-
covering foj the attack of pharyn-
gitis with which he has been confin-
ed to his home for several days. He
hopes to be in his office again Mon-
day or Tuesday, but has found it nee-
essary to cancel three speaking en-.
gageemnts for the first of, the week.
He was to hags spoken to a meet-
ing of the Detroit "M" club in the
Union Waday, and to the Adrian col-
lege and high school on Tuesday aft-
ernoon. He had also planned to at-
tend the Arfdian chamber of commerce
banquet on Tuesday evening.

BULLETIN
Up to the time that The Daily
went to press Saturday night
nothing had been heard from
either the baskhetball or the swim-
Ming team.
MONDAY LAST DAY FOR
UNION OPERA TRYOUTS

TOTAL RECEIPTS FRE
DRIVE FALL BELO NIH'TIA

MORE THAN FIVE HUNDRED
DENTS OUT FOR CAST
OR CHORUS

STU-

Tryouts for
Wnday with

the Union opera close
more than 500 stu-

dents evincing a desire to make thet
cast or chorus. The turnout was thel
largest in the history of Union
operas. There are 40 chorus posi-
tions and 12 in the cast to be filled
this week by E. Mortimer Shuter,
opera director, and Earl V. 'Moore,
director of music. The former will
pass on the acting and dancing abil-
ity of the tryouts, while the latter is
the music critic.
First, second and third choices will,
be made for each of the 52 parts,1
about the same number as last year.
Notice will be sent before the end of£
the week to each man successful inI
obtainng a first choice. The second1
and third choices will be held in re-
serve, should the others fail to at-
tain the eligibility standard or show
indifference to the work.
All around ability will be made the
general requirement but in special in-
stances, extraordinary acting, singing
or dancing ability will be needed.
In the poster -contest, the 21 candi-
dates have until Feb. 15 to submit,
their designs for the program cover.
Last year there were but four who
tried out for this work.
Musical compositions have been.
coming in early, and according to a
statement by Mr. Shuter yesterday,
"half of the numbers are now back
from the Cincinnati orchestrators,
which is remarkable for so long a time.
before the opera."
CarlBrummel, Union scenic artist,
is making the models for the scenery
in Detroit, and in about 10 days will
come here to commence the building
of the scenery in the workshop.
ALPHA DELTS TO BE
CONVENTION HOSTS
Expecting a crowd of 400 delegates,
the Michigan chapter of Alpha Delta
Phi will be host at the annual con-
vention of the fraternity Feb. 17, 18,
and 19, in Ann Arbor. # To accommo-
date the guests from the 25 chapters
of the fraternity, all the sleeping
rooms at the Union have been reserved
for those dates and the assembly hall
has been chosen for the business meet-
ings. Other State street fraternities
have offered their houses as sleep-
ing accommodations for a limited
number of delegates, and various
hotels in the city will take care of
the rest of the members.
Col. E. M. House, president of the
fraternity, will not attend the conven-
tion. Feb. 19, the last night of the
convention, a banquet will be held at
the Statler Hotel, Detroit.. Secretary
of State Colby and Bishop John H.
White, of Indiana, are to be the prin-
cipal speakers at the banquet.
DEAN LLOYD WILL ATTEND
INAUGURATION OF ATWOOD
Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, of th-Grad-
uate school, will go tomorrow to Clark
university at Worcester, Mass., to be
present at the inauguration of the new
president, W. W. Atwpod. Dean Lloyd
will represent the University of Mich-
igan at the inauguration. The pro-
gram for the latter includes the inau-
gural exercises, a reception for visit-
ing delegates, alumni, and guests, and
a dinner for the representatives of
other institutions.
THE 'WEATHER
Probably Snow and Much Colder, with
a Cold Wave, Increasing East Winds
Shifting to North and Northwest
Sunday.

PRICE FIVE CENTS
IM REL11IEFUND
I QOTA SET FOR,
OU0NT I S $6,903.6
STUDENTS AND FACULTY, UNION
DANCE, AND MAJ
CONTRIBUTE
MICHIGAN MISSES GOAL,
BUT SHOWING IS GOOD
Chinese Club Most Active in Securing
Contributions from Campus and
Outside Sources
Last night saw the close of the Uni-
versity Foreign Relief fund drive,
with the total receipts far below the
quota which, had been set. The
amount taken in from the general
student drive was $6,660.04; the dance
returns show $169.85; and the Majes-
tic is turning over at least $73.80 to
the fund. This makes $6,903.69 which
Michigan will send to the national
committee.
"While Michigan did not succeed
in reaching her full quota," said Fred
J. Petty, '21, chairman of the fund
committee, last night, "she certainly
made a most creditable showing. We
will no doubt rank high among all
contributors who have helped to al-
leviate the suffering from hunger and
cold among the Chinese and Euro-
peans. This need is unquestionably
an imperative one; and the spirit
shown by Michigan is to be com-
mended, for this request, although a
humanitarian one, depended upon the
attitude of the student body for its
support.
Clubs and Societies Aid
"In the putting across the campaign
all sectional clubs and honorary so-
cieties were asked to assist in sol-
liciting students and faculty. Some
organizations failed to co-operate.
However, the most of them did their
share and more. The Chimes club in
particular did exceptionally fine
work. They not only contributed
$125 from their own treasury, but
went to friends in Detroit from whom
they secured $150 and to others in To-
ledo from whom they secured $125.
In addition to this they have many
smaller contributions which brings
their total above that of any other
club. Another of the organizations
which deserves special mention is the
Men's Educational club.
"The Commercial club, Quarter-
deck, the South African club, the
Newark club, Triangle, Vulcans, the
Cosmopolitan club, Les Voyagers, the
Saginaw club, and the Westerners'
club all came across in fine shape.
Rogers' Orchestra Plays
"The committee wants to take this
opportunity of acknowledging the
kindness of George E. Rogers' Spot-
Johnston, '21E, looked after solicita-
(Continued on Page Six)
DUEMLING GIVEN
FULL EXONERATION
A. H. Duemling, '23, of Fort Wayne,
Ind., received a full exoneration from
the charge of drunkenness, for which
he was arrested last Sunday morning
with three others in connection with
a disturbance on Ingalls street, and
all records of the arrest have been

erased from the police and court
books.
Duemling, who left college in No-
vember on account of illness, had re-
mained here to tutor and was plan-
ning on coming back to college in
February. At the time of the arrest
Duemling was trying to get the other
men back to their rooms. He ran
with the others when the officers ap-
peared. When brought up before the
court he pleaded not guilty and the
officer making the arrest substan-
tiated the charge.
August C. Muehlhauser, '23, of San-
dusky, Ohio, who was shot and seri-
ously injured by Patrolman Clark ear-
ly Sunday morning, is resting com-
fortably, according to the hospital
authlorities. While not yet out of
danger, the young man is much bet-
ter and if nothing occurs to cause a
relapse, will soon be well on the
road to recovery.
Clark has Peen suspended by Mayor
Ernst Wurster pending investigation
of, the affair. The faculty will take
no action upon the case of Muehlhau-
ser until he is able to appear before
them.

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